Exercise and postprandial lipaemia: effects on peripheral vascular function, oxidative stress and gastrointestinal transit

Miriam Clegg, Conor McClean, Gareth Davison, Marie Murphy, Tom Trinick, Ellie Duly, JAD McLaughlin, Mark Fogarty, Amir Shafat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Postprandial lipaemia may lead to an increase in oxidative stress, inducing endothelial dysfunction. Exercise can slow gastric emptying rates, moderating postprandial lipaemia. The purpose of this study was to determine if moderate exercise, prior to fat ingestion, influences gastrointestinal transit, lipaemia, oxidative stress and arterial wall function. Eight apparently healthy males (age 23.6 ± 2.8 yrs; height 181.4 ± 8.1 cm; weight 83.4 ± 16.2 kg; all data mean ± SD) participated in the randomised, crossover design, where (i) subjects ingested a high-fat meal alone (control), and (ii) ingested a high-fat meal, preceded by 1 h of moderate exercise. Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) was examined at baseline, post-exercise, and in the postprandial period. Gastric emptying was measured using the 13C-octanoic acid breath test. Measures of venous blood were obtained prior to and following exercise and at 2, 4 and 6 hours post-ingestion. PWV increased (6.5 ± 1.9 m/sec) at 2 (8.9 ± 1.7 m/sec) and 4 hrs (9.0 ± 1.6 m/sec) post-ingestion in the control group (time × groupinteraction, P <0.05). PWV was increased at 2 hrs post-ingestion in the control compared to the exercise trial; 8.9 ± 1.7 vs. 6.2 ± 1.5 m/sec (time × group interaction, P <0.05). Lipidhydroperoxides increased over time (pooled exercise and control data, P <0.05). Serumtriacylglycerols were elevated postprandially (pooled exercise and control data, P <0.05). There were no changes in gastric emptying, cholesterol, or C-reactive protein levels. These data suggest that acute exercise prior to the consumption of a high-fat meal has the potential to reduce vascular impairments.
LanguageEnglish
JournalLipids in Health and Disease
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Oct 2007

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Gastrointestinal Transit
Pulse Wave Analysis
Blood Vessels
Gastric Emptying
Oxidative Stress
Eating
Fats
Meals
Postprandial Period
Breath Tests
C-Reactive Protein
Cross-Over Studies
Cholesterol
Exercise
Weights and Measures
Control Groups

Cite this

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title = "Exercise and postprandial lipaemia: effects on peripheral vascular function, oxidative stress and gastrointestinal transit",
abstract = "Postprandial lipaemia may lead to an increase in oxidative stress, inducing endothelial dysfunction. Exercise can slow gastric emptying rates, moderating postprandial lipaemia. The purpose of this study was to determine if moderate exercise, prior to fat ingestion, influences gastrointestinal transit, lipaemia, oxidative stress and arterial wall function. Eight apparently healthy males (age 23.6 ± 2.8 yrs; height 181.4 ± 8.1 cm; weight 83.4 ± 16.2 kg; all data mean ± SD) participated in the randomised, crossover design, where (i) subjects ingested a high-fat meal alone (control), and (ii) ingested a high-fat meal, preceded by 1 h of moderate exercise. Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) was examined at baseline, post-exercise, and in the postprandial period. Gastric emptying was measured using the 13C-octanoic acid breath test. Measures of venous blood were obtained prior to and following exercise and at 2, 4 and 6 hours post-ingestion. PWV increased (6.5 ± 1.9 m/sec) at 2 (8.9 ± 1.7 m/sec) and 4 hrs (9.0 ± 1.6 m/sec) post-ingestion in the control group (time × groupinteraction, P <0.05). PWV was increased at 2 hrs post-ingestion in the control compared to the exercise trial; 8.9 ± 1.7 vs. 6.2 ± 1.5 m/sec (time × group interaction, P <0.05). Lipidhydroperoxides increased over time (pooled exercise and control data, P <0.05). Serumtriacylglycerols were elevated postprandially (pooled exercise and control data, P <0.05). There were no changes in gastric emptying, cholesterol, or C-reactive protein levels. These data suggest that acute exercise prior to the consumption of a high-fat meal has the potential to reduce vascular impairments.",
author = "Miriam Clegg and Conor McClean and Gareth Davison and Marie Murphy and Tom Trinick and Ellie Duly and JAD McLaughlin and Mark Fogarty and Amir Shafat",
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Exercise and postprandial lipaemia: effects on peripheral vascular function, oxidative stress and gastrointestinal transit. / Clegg, Miriam; McClean, Conor; Davison, Gareth; Murphy, Marie; Trinick, Tom; Duly, Ellie; McLaughlin, JAD; Fogarty, Mark; Shafat, Amir.

In: Lipids in Health and Disease, Vol. 6, 31.10.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Exercise and postprandial lipaemia: effects on peripheral vascular function, oxidative stress and gastrointestinal transit

AU - Clegg, Miriam

AU - McClean, Conor

AU - Davison, Gareth

AU - Murphy, Marie

AU - Trinick, Tom

AU - Duly, Ellie

AU - McLaughlin, JAD

AU - Fogarty, Mark

AU - Shafat, Amir

PY - 2007/10/31

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N2 - Postprandial lipaemia may lead to an increase in oxidative stress, inducing endothelial dysfunction. Exercise can slow gastric emptying rates, moderating postprandial lipaemia. The purpose of this study was to determine if moderate exercise, prior to fat ingestion, influences gastrointestinal transit, lipaemia, oxidative stress and arterial wall function. Eight apparently healthy males (age 23.6 ± 2.8 yrs; height 181.4 ± 8.1 cm; weight 83.4 ± 16.2 kg; all data mean ± SD) participated in the randomised, crossover design, where (i) subjects ingested a high-fat meal alone (control), and (ii) ingested a high-fat meal, preceded by 1 h of moderate exercise. Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) was examined at baseline, post-exercise, and in the postprandial period. Gastric emptying was measured using the 13C-octanoic acid breath test. Measures of venous blood were obtained prior to and following exercise and at 2, 4 and 6 hours post-ingestion. PWV increased (6.5 ± 1.9 m/sec) at 2 (8.9 ± 1.7 m/sec) and 4 hrs (9.0 ± 1.6 m/sec) post-ingestion in the control group (time × groupinteraction, P <0.05). PWV was increased at 2 hrs post-ingestion in the control compared to the exercise trial; 8.9 ± 1.7 vs. 6.2 ± 1.5 m/sec (time × group interaction, P <0.05). Lipidhydroperoxides increased over time (pooled exercise and control data, P <0.05). Serumtriacylglycerols were elevated postprandially (pooled exercise and control data, P <0.05). There were no changes in gastric emptying, cholesterol, or C-reactive protein levels. These data suggest that acute exercise prior to the consumption of a high-fat meal has the potential to reduce vascular impairments.

AB - Postprandial lipaemia may lead to an increase in oxidative stress, inducing endothelial dysfunction. Exercise can slow gastric emptying rates, moderating postprandial lipaemia. The purpose of this study was to determine if moderate exercise, prior to fat ingestion, influences gastrointestinal transit, lipaemia, oxidative stress and arterial wall function. Eight apparently healthy males (age 23.6 ± 2.8 yrs; height 181.4 ± 8.1 cm; weight 83.4 ± 16.2 kg; all data mean ± SD) participated in the randomised, crossover design, where (i) subjects ingested a high-fat meal alone (control), and (ii) ingested a high-fat meal, preceded by 1 h of moderate exercise. Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) was examined at baseline, post-exercise, and in the postprandial period. Gastric emptying was measured using the 13C-octanoic acid breath test. Measures of venous blood were obtained prior to and following exercise and at 2, 4 and 6 hours post-ingestion. PWV increased (6.5 ± 1.9 m/sec) at 2 (8.9 ± 1.7 m/sec) and 4 hrs (9.0 ± 1.6 m/sec) post-ingestion in the control group (time × groupinteraction, P <0.05). PWV was increased at 2 hrs post-ingestion in the control compared to the exercise trial; 8.9 ± 1.7 vs. 6.2 ± 1.5 m/sec (time × group interaction, P <0.05). Lipidhydroperoxides increased over time (pooled exercise and control data, P <0.05). Serumtriacylglycerols were elevated postprandially (pooled exercise and control data, P <0.05). There were no changes in gastric emptying, cholesterol, or C-reactive protein levels. These data suggest that acute exercise prior to the consumption of a high-fat meal has the potential to reduce vascular impairments.

U2 - 10.1186/1476-511X-6-30

DO - 10.1186/1476-511X-6-30

M3 - Article

VL - 6

JO - Lipids in Health and Disease

T2 - Lipids in Health and Disease

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SN - 1476-511X

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