Epigenetic control of sexual differentiation of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in mice

Elaine Murray, A Hien, GJ De Vries, NG Forger

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    The principal nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria teminalis (BNSTp) is larger and contains more cells in male mice than in females. These sex differences arise from a higher rate of cell death during early postnatal life in females. Perinatal differences in testosterone appear to create this difference because neonatal testosterone treatment reduces cell death in females to the level seen in males. There is a delay of about six days between testosterone exposure and the peak of cell death, indicating that cells somehow ‘remember’ whether or not they have been exposed to high levels of testosterone. This suggests that epigenetic mechanisms control cell fate. We examined whether histone acetylation, which is typically associated with activation of gene expression, plays a role in the sexual differentiation of the BNSTp. We manipulated the balance between histone acetylation and deacetylation by treating animals with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) at the critical time for sexual differentiation. Males, females, and females treated neonatally with testosterone were treated with 50mg/kg VPA or saline on postnatal days 1 and 2. Animals were sacrificed on postnatal day 21 and volume and cell number of the BNSTp was determined. VPA treatment did not influence volume or cell number in control females but significantly reduced both of these parameters in males and testosterone-treated females, thereby eliminating the sex difference. No volume changes were noted in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, suggesting that the VPA effect was specific to the BNSTp. These findings suggest that a disruption in histone deacetylation blocks the masculinizing actions of testosterone in the BNSTp.
    LanguageEnglish
    Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
    Number of pages1
    Publication statusPublished - 2008
    EventSociety for Neuroscience, 2008 - Washington, DC
    Duration: 1 Jan 2008 → …

    Conference

    ConferenceSociety for Neuroscience, 2008
    Period1/01/08 → …

    Fingerprint

    Septal Nuclei
    Sex Differentiation
    Epigenomics
    Testosterone
    Valproic Acid
    Histones
    Cell Death
    Acetylation
    Sex Characteristics
    Cell Count
    Suprachiasmatic Nucleus
    Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors
    Gene Expression

    Cite this

    Murray, E., Hien, A., De Vries, GJ., & Forger, NG. (2008). Epigenetic control of sexual differentiation of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in mice. In Unknown Host Publication
    Murray, Elaine ; Hien, A ; De Vries, GJ ; Forger, NG. / Epigenetic control of sexual differentiation of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in mice. Unknown Host Publication. 2008.
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    Murray, E, Hien, A, De Vries, GJ & Forger, NG 2008, Epigenetic control of sexual differentiation of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in mice. in Unknown Host Publication. Society for Neuroscience, 2008, 1/01/08.

    Epigenetic control of sexual differentiation of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in mice. / Murray, Elaine; Hien, A; De Vries, GJ; Forger, NG.

    Unknown Host Publication. 2008.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    TY - GEN

    T1 - Epigenetic control of sexual differentiation of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in mice

    AU - Murray, Elaine

    AU - Hien, A

    AU - De Vries, GJ

    AU - Forger, NG

    PY - 2008

    Y1 - 2008

    N2 - The principal nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria teminalis (BNSTp) is larger and contains more cells in male mice than in females. These sex differences arise from a higher rate of cell death during early postnatal life in females. Perinatal differences in testosterone appear to create this difference because neonatal testosterone treatment reduces cell death in females to the level seen in males. There is a delay of about six days between testosterone exposure and the peak of cell death, indicating that cells somehow ‘remember’ whether or not they have been exposed to high levels of testosterone. This suggests that epigenetic mechanisms control cell fate. We examined whether histone acetylation, which is typically associated with activation of gene expression, plays a role in the sexual differentiation of the BNSTp. We manipulated the balance between histone acetylation and deacetylation by treating animals with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) at the critical time for sexual differentiation. Males, females, and females treated neonatally with testosterone were treated with 50mg/kg VPA or saline on postnatal days 1 and 2. Animals were sacrificed on postnatal day 21 and volume and cell number of the BNSTp was determined. VPA treatment did not influence volume or cell number in control females but significantly reduced both of these parameters in males and testosterone-treated females, thereby eliminating the sex difference. No volume changes were noted in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, suggesting that the VPA effect was specific to the BNSTp. These findings suggest that a disruption in histone deacetylation blocks the masculinizing actions of testosterone in the BNSTp.

    AB - The principal nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria teminalis (BNSTp) is larger and contains more cells in male mice than in females. These sex differences arise from a higher rate of cell death during early postnatal life in females. Perinatal differences in testosterone appear to create this difference because neonatal testosterone treatment reduces cell death in females to the level seen in males. There is a delay of about six days between testosterone exposure and the peak of cell death, indicating that cells somehow ‘remember’ whether or not they have been exposed to high levels of testosterone. This suggests that epigenetic mechanisms control cell fate. We examined whether histone acetylation, which is typically associated with activation of gene expression, plays a role in the sexual differentiation of the BNSTp. We manipulated the balance between histone acetylation and deacetylation by treating animals with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) at the critical time for sexual differentiation. Males, females, and females treated neonatally with testosterone were treated with 50mg/kg VPA or saline on postnatal days 1 and 2. Animals were sacrificed on postnatal day 21 and volume and cell number of the BNSTp was determined. VPA treatment did not influence volume or cell number in control females but significantly reduced both of these parameters in males and testosterone-treated females, thereby eliminating the sex difference. No volume changes were noted in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, suggesting that the VPA effect was specific to the BNSTp. These findings suggest that a disruption in histone deacetylation blocks the masculinizing actions of testosterone in the BNSTp.

    M3 - Conference contribution

    BT - Unknown Host Publication

    ER -

    Murray E, Hien A, De Vries GJ, Forger NG. Epigenetic control of sexual differentiation of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in mice. In Unknown Host Publication. 2008