Emergency department and hospital care prior to suicide: A population based case control study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: High proportions of those who die by suicide in Northern Ireland (NI) are not known to mental health services, making it important to understand contact with the wider health services. Previous research has not examined the patterns of emergency department (ED) attendance and hospital admissions amongst those who have died by suicide in NI. Objectives: The study objectives are to examine the relationships between ED attendances, hospital admissions, and death by suicide. Methods: A case control methodology was used, drawing on routinely collected administrative data on all deaths by suicide in Northern Ireland between 1/1/2012 and 31/12/2015. Each death was matched to 5 live controls, based on age and gender (n = 6630). Results: Death by suicide is associated with a recent ED attendance, with the highest odds for those who attended within the past three months (odds = 3.2, 95% CI = 2.5-4.2). Death by suicide is also associated with recent hospital admission, with the highest odds of death for admission within the past three months (odds = 6.6, 95% CI = 5.2-8.3). The odds of suicide are also higher for those living in a more deprived or urban area. Limitations: The study is limited to administrative data. Conclusions: Staff in EDs and hospitals may have a role in suicide prevention. These findings again support the importance of addressing economic deprivation and other area level factors, such as contagion in suicide prevention strategies.
LanguageEnglish
Pages366-370
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume249
Early online date19 Feb 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Apr 2019

Fingerprint

Suicide
Case-Control Studies
Hospital Emergency Service
Population
Northern Ireland
Mental Health Services
Health Services
Economics
Research

Keywords

  • suicide; emergency department; hospital admission; deprivation; urban
  • Urban
  • Deprivation
  • Emergency department
  • Hospital admission
  • Suicide

Cite this

@article{bdf2296bbc8043229bd37a53e110b2a9,
title = "Emergency department and hospital care prior to suicide: A population based case control study",
abstract = "Background: High proportions of those who die by suicide in Northern Ireland (NI) are not known to mental health services, making it important to understand contact with the wider health services. Previous research has not examined the patterns of emergency department (ED) attendance and hospital admissions amongst those who have died by suicide in NI. Objectives: The study objectives are to examine the relationships between ED attendances, hospital admissions, and death by suicide. Methods: A case control methodology was used, drawing on routinely collected administrative data on all deaths by suicide in Northern Ireland between 1/1/2012 and 31/12/2015. Each death was matched to 5 live controls, based on age and gender (n = 6630). Results: Death by suicide is associated with a recent ED attendance, with the highest odds for those who attended within the past three months (odds = 3.2, 95{\%} CI = 2.5-4.2). Death by suicide is also associated with recent hospital admission, with the highest odds of death for admission within the past three months (odds = 6.6, 95{\%} CI = 5.2-8.3). The odds of suicide are also higher for those living in a more deprived or urban area. Limitations: The study is limited to administrative data. Conclusions: Staff in EDs and hospitals may have a role in suicide prevention. These findings again support the importance of addressing economic deprivation and other area level factors, such as contagion in suicide prevention strategies.",
keywords = "suicide; emergency department; hospital admission; deprivation; urban, Urban, Deprivation, Emergency department, Hospital admission, Suicide",
author = "Siobhan O'Neill and Byron Graham and Edel Ennis",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.jad.2019.02.052",
language = "English",
volume = "249",
pages = "366--370",
journal = "Journal of Affective Disorders",
issn = "0165-0327",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

Emergency department and hospital care prior to suicide: A population based case control study. / O'Neill, Siobhan; Graham, Byron; Ennis, Edel.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 249, 15.04.2019, p. 366-370.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Emergency department and hospital care prior to suicide: A population based case control study

AU - O'Neill, Siobhan

AU - Graham, Byron

AU - Ennis, Edel

PY - 2019/4/15

Y1 - 2019/4/15

N2 - Background: High proportions of those who die by suicide in Northern Ireland (NI) are not known to mental health services, making it important to understand contact with the wider health services. Previous research has not examined the patterns of emergency department (ED) attendance and hospital admissions amongst those who have died by suicide in NI. Objectives: The study objectives are to examine the relationships between ED attendances, hospital admissions, and death by suicide. Methods: A case control methodology was used, drawing on routinely collected administrative data on all deaths by suicide in Northern Ireland between 1/1/2012 and 31/12/2015. Each death was matched to 5 live controls, based on age and gender (n = 6630). Results: Death by suicide is associated with a recent ED attendance, with the highest odds for those who attended within the past three months (odds = 3.2, 95% CI = 2.5-4.2). Death by suicide is also associated with recent hospital admission, with the highest odds of death for admission within the past three months (odds = 6.6, 95% CI = 5.2-8.3). The odds of suicide are also higher for those living in a more deprived or urban area. Limitations: The study is limited to administrative data. Conclusions: Staff in EDs and hospitals may have a role in suicide prevention. These findings again support the importance of addressing economic deprivation and other area level factors, such as contagion in suicide prevention strategies.

AB - Background: High proportions of those who die by suicide in Northern Ireland (NI) are not known to mental health services, making it important to understand contact with the wider health services. Previous research has not examined the patterns of emergency department (ED) attendance and hospital admissions amongst those who have died by suicide in NI. Objectives: The study objectives are to examine the relationships between ED attendances, hospital admissions, and death by suicide. Methods: A case control methodology was used, drawing on routinely collected administrative data on all deaths by suicide in Northern Ireland between 1/1/2012 and 31/12/2015. Each death was matched to 5 live controls, based on age and gender (n = 6630). Results: Death by suicide is associated with a recent ED attendance, with the highest odds for those who attended within the past three months (odds = 3.2, 95% CI = 2.5-4.2). Death by suicide is also associated with recent hospital admission, with the highest odds of death for admission within the past three months (odds = 6.6, 95% CI = 5.2-8.3). The odds of suicide are also higher for those living in a more deprived or urban area. Limitations: The study is limited to administrative data. Conclusions: Staff in EDs and hospitals may have a role in suicide prevention. These findings again support the importance of addressing economic deprivation and other area level factors, such as contagion in suicide prevention strategies.

KW - suicide; emergency department; hospital admission; deprivation; urban

KW - Urban

KW - Deprivation

KW - Emergency department

KW - Hospital admission

KW - Suicide

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061893312&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jad.2019.02.052

DO - 10.1016/j.jad.2019.02.052

M3 - Article

VL - 249

SP - 366

EP - 370

JO - Journal of Affective Disorders

T2 - Journal of Affective Disorders

JF - Journal of Affective Disorders

SN - 0165-0327

ER -