Effects of a Low-Volume, Vigorous Intensity Step Exercise Program on Functional Mobility in Middle-Aged Adults

Emer, P Doheny, Denise McGrath, Massimiliano Ditroilo, Jacqueline L. Mair, Barry R. Greene, Brian Caulfield, Giuseppe de Vito, Madeleine M. Lowrey

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Aging-related decline in functional mobility is associated with loss of independence. This decline may be mitigated through programs of physical activity. Despite reports of aging-related mobility impairment in middle-aged adults, this age group has been largely overlooked in terms of exercise programs that target functional mobility and the preservation of independence in older age. A method to quantitatively assess changes in functional mobility could direct rehabilitation in a proactive rather than reactive manner. Thirty-three healthy but sedentary middle-aged adults participated in a four week low-volume, vigorous intensity stepping exercise program. Two baseline testing sessions and one post-training testing session were conducted. Functional mobility was assessed using the timed up and go (TUG) test, with its constituent sit-to-walk and walk-to-sit phases examined using a novel inertial sensor-based method. Additionally, semi-tandem balance and knee extensor muscle isometric torque were assessed. Trunk acceleration during walk-to-sit reduced significantly post-training, suggesting altered movement control due to the exercise program. No significant training-induced changes in sit-to-walk acceleration, TUG time, balance or torque were observed. The novel method of functional mobility assessment presented provides a reliable means to quantify subtle changes in mobility during postural transitions. Over time, this exercise program may improve functional mobility.
    LanguageEnglish
    JournalAnnals of Biomedical Engineering
    VolumeOnline
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 16 Apr 2013

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    Exercise
    Torque
    Knee
    Rehabilitation
    Age Groups
    Muscles

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    Doheny, E. P., McGrath, D., Ditroilo, M., Mair, J. L., Greene, B. R., Caulfield, B., ... Lowrey, M. M. (2013). Effects of a Low-Volume, Vigorous Intensity Step Exercise Program on Functional Mobility in Middle-Aged Adults. Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Online. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10439-013-0804-8
    Doheny, Emer, P ; McGrath, Denise ; Ditroilo, Massimiliano ; Mair, Jacqueline L. ; Greene, Barry R. ; Caulfield, Brian ; de Vito, Giuseppe ; Lowrey, Madeleine M. / Effects of a Low-Volume, Vigorous Intensity Step Exercise Program on Functional Mobility in Middle-Aged Adults. In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering. 2013 ; Vol. Online.
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    abstract = "Aging-related decline in functional mobility is associated with loss of independence. This decline may be mitigated through programs of physical activity. Despite reports of aging-related mobility impairment in middle-aged adults, this age group has been largely overlooked in terms of exercise programs that target functional mobility and the preservation of independence in older age. A method to quantitatively assess changes in functional mobility could direct rehabilitation in a proactive rather than reactive manner. Thirty-three healthy but sedentary middle-aged adults participated in a four week low-volume, vigorous intensity stepping exercise program. Two baseline testing sessions and one post-training testing session were conducted. Functional mobility was assessed using the timed up and go (TUG) test, with its constituent sit-to-walk and walk-to-sit phases examined using a novel inertial sensor-based method. Additionally, semi-tandem balance and knee extensor muscle isometric torque were assessed. Trunk acceleration during walk-to-sit reduced significantly post-training, suggesting altered movement control due to the exercise program. No significant training-induced changes in sit-to-walk acceleration, TUG time, balance or torque were observed. The novel method of functional mobility assessment presented provides a reliable means to quantify subtle changes in mobility during postural transitions. Over time, this exercise program may improve functional mobility.",
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    Doheny, EP, McGrath, D, Ditroilo, M, Mair, JL, Greene, BR, Caulfield, B, de Vito, G & Lowrey, MM 2013, 'Effects of a Low-Volume, Vigorous Intensity Step Exercise Program on Functional Mobility in Middle-Aged Adults', Annals of Biomedical Engineering, vol. Online. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10439-013-0804-8

    Effects of a Low-Volume, Vigorous Intensity Step Exercise Program on Functional Mobility in Middle-Aged Adults. / Doheny, Emer, P; McGrath, Denise; Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Mair, Jacqueline L.; Greene, Barry R.; Caulfield, Brian; de Vito, Giuseppe; Lowrey, Madeleine M.

    In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Vol. Online, 16.04.2013.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Doheny, Emer, P

    AU - McGrath, Denise

    AU - Ditroilo, Massimiliano

    AU - Mair, Jacqueline L.

    AU - Greene, Barry R.

    AU - Caulfield, Brian

    AU - de Vito, Giuseppe

    AU - Lowrey, Madeleine M.

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    AB - Aging-related decline in functional mobility is associated with loss of independence. This decline may be mitigated through programs of physical activity. Despite reports of aging-related mobility impairment in middle-aged adults, this age group has been largely overlooked in terms of exercise programs that target functional mobility and the preservation of independence in older age. A method to quantitatively assess changes in functional mobility could direct rehabilitation in a proactive rather than reactive manner. Thirty-three healthy but sedentary middle-aged adults participated in a four week low-volume, vigorous intensity stepping exercise program. Two baseline testing sessions and one post-training testing session were conducted. Functional mobility was assessed using the timed up and go (TUG) test, with its constituent sit-to-walk and walk-to-sit phases examined using a novel inertial sensor-based method. Additionally, semi-tandem balance and knee extensor muscle isometric torque were assessed. Trunk acceleration during walk-to-sit reduced significantly post-training, suggesting altered movement control due to the exercise program. No significant training-induced changes in sit-to-walk acceleration, TUG time, balance or torque were observed. The novel method of functional mobility assessment presented provides a reliable means to quantify subtle changes in mobility during postural transitions. Over time, this exercise program may improve functional mobility.

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