Effective teacher talk: a threshold concept in TESOL

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

English language teachers are expected to use effective teacher talk, however, teacher education courses do not always clarify how student teachers can achieve this. This paper advocates that understanding and using effective teacher talk is crucial for successful ELT and as such is a ‘threshold concept’ in TESOL. ‘Threshold concept’ is a term used in higher education to describe core concepts that once understood, transform perception of a subject and help students progress in their discipline. In this study nine NS and NNS EFL student teachers explore their use of teacher talk by participating in stimulated recall interviews using recordings of teaching practice lessons as the stimuli. Findings show trainees understand effective teacher talk differently, with some trainees linking it to pedagogical purpose whilst others do not. This study is the first to examine threshold concepts in TESOL and shows it is a useful micro-perspective for developing the TESOL curricula.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1-13
JournalELT Journal
Volume71
Issue number2
Early online date12 Sep 2016
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 12 Sep 2016

Fingerprint

Students
teacher
trainee
Curriculum
student teacher
Teaching
Language
Interviews
Education
teaching practice
English language
TESOL
Teacher Talk
recording
education
stimulus
curriculum
interview
student
Teacher Training

Keywords

  • TESOL
  • teacher education
  • teacher talk
  • threshold concept

Cite this

@article{aab1847005504cac9b5552aa95405589,
title = "Effective teacher talk: a threshold concept in TESOL",
abstract = "English language teachers are expected to use effective teacher talk, however, teacher education courses do not always clarify how student teachers can achieve this. This paper advocates that understanding and using effective teacher talk is crucial for successful ELT and as such is a ‘threshold concept’ in TESOL. ‘Threshold concept’ is a term used in higher education to describe core concepts that once understood, transform perception of a subject and help students progress in their discipline. In this study nine NS and NNS EFL student teachers explore their use of teacher talk by participating in stimulated recall interviews using recordings of teaching practice lessons as the stimuli. Findings show trainees understand effective teacher talk differently, with some trainees linking it to pedagogical purpose whilst others do not. This study is the first to examine threshold concepts in TESOL and shows it is a useful micro-perspective for developing the TESOL curricula.",
keywords = "TESOL, teacher education, teacher talk, threshold concept",
author = "Barbara Skinner",
note = "UIR Compliant - evidence uploaded to other files Reference text: Burman, M.E. and A. M. Kleinsasser. 2004. ‘Ethical guidelines for use of student work: moving from teaching's invisibility in the scholarship of teaching and learning’. The Journal of General Education 53/11: 59-79. Donato, R. 1994. ‘Collective scaffolding in second language learning’ in J. P. Lantolf and G. Appel (eds.). Vygotskian Approaches to Second Language Research. Norwood, New Jersey: Ablex Publishing. Johns, C. 2000. Becoming a Reflective Practitioner. Oxford: Blackwell Science. Land, R., Meyer, J.H.F. and C. Baillie. 2010. ‘Editors' preface: threshold concepts and transformational learning’ in R. Land, J.H.F. Meyer and C. Baillie (eds.). Threshold concepts and Transformational Learning. Rotterdam: Sense publishers, ix-xlii. Lucas, U. and R. Mladenovic. 2007. ‘The potential of threshold concepts: an emerging framework for educational research and practice’. London Review of Education 5/3: 237-248. Lyle, J. 2003. ‘Stimulated recall: a report on its use in naturalistic research’. British Educational Research Journal 29/6: 861-878. Meyer, J.H.F. and R. Land. 2005. ‘Threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge: epistemological considerations and a conceptual framework for teaching and learning’. Higher Education 49: 373-388. Meyer, J.H.F., Land, R. and P. Davies. 2008. ‘Threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge: issues of variation and variability’ in R. Land, J.H.F. Meyer and J. Smith (eds.). Threshold concepts within the Disciplines. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 59-74. Rowbottom, D.P. 2007. ‘Demystifying threshold concepts’. Journal of Philosophy of Education, vol. 41, no. 2, pp. 263-270. Seedhouse, P. 2005. ‘Conversation analysis and language learning: state of the art article’. Language Teaching 38: 165-187. Walsh, S. 2003. ‘Developing interactional awareness in the second language classroom through teacher self-evaluation’. Language Awareness 12/2: 124-141. Walsh, S. 2006a. Investigating classroom discourse. Abingdon: Routledge. Walsh, S. 2006b. ‘Talking the talk of the TESOL classroom’. ELT Journal 60/2: 133-141.",
year = "2016",
month = "9",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1093/elt/ccw062",
language = "English",
volume = "71",
pages = "1--13",
journal = "ELT Journal",
issn = "0951-0893",
number = "2",

}

Effective teacher talk: a threshold concept in TESOL. / Skinner, Barbara.

In: ELT Journal, Vol. 71, No. 2, 12.09.2016, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effective teacher talk: a threshold concept in TESOL

AU - Skinner, Barbara

N1 - UIR Compliant - evidence uploaded to other files Reference text: Burman, M.E. and A. M. Kleinsasser. 2004. ‘Ethical guidelines for use of student work: moving from teaching's invisibility in the scholarship of teaching and learning’. The Journal of General Education 53/11: 59-79. Donato, R. 1994. ‘Collective scaffolding in second language learning’ in J. P. Lantolf and G. Appel (eds.). Vygotskian Approaches to Second Language Research. Norwood, New Jersey: Ablex Publishing. Johns, C. 2000. Becoming a Reflective Practitioner. Oxford: Blackwell Science. Land, R., Meyer, J.H.F. and C. Baillie. 2010. ‘Editors' preface: threshold concepts and transformational learning’ in R. Land, J.H.F. Meyer and C. Baillie (eds.). Threshold concepts and Transformational Learning. Rotterdam: Sense publishers, ix-xlii. Lucas, U. and R. Mladenovic. 2007. ‘The potential of threshold concepts: an emerging framework for educational research and practice’. London Review of Education 5/3: 237-248. Lyle, J. 2003. ‘Stimulated recall: a report on its use in naturalistic research’. British Educational Research Journal 29/6: 861-878. Meyer, J.H.F. and R. Land. 2005. ‘Threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge: epistemological considerations and a conceptual framework for teaching and learning’. Higher Education 49: 373-388. Meyer, J.H.F., Land, R. and P. Davies. 2008. ‘Threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge: issues of variation and variability’ in R. Land, J.H.F. Meyer and J. Smith (eds.). Threshold concepts within the Disciplines. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 59-74. Rowbottom, D.P. 2007. ‘Demystifying threshold concepts’. Journal of Philosophy of Education, vol. 41, no. 2, pp. 263-270. Seedhouse, P. 2005. ‘Conversation analysis and language learning: state of the art article’. Language Teaching 38: 165-187. Walsh, S. 2003. ‘Developing interactional awareness in the second language classroom through teacher self-evaluation’. Language Awareness 12/2: 124-141. Walsh, S. 2006a. Investigating classroom discourse. Abingdon: Routledge. Walsh, S. 2006b. ‘Talking the talk of the TESOL classroom’. ELT Journal 60/2: 133-141.

PY - 2016/9/12

Y1 - 2016/9/12

N2 - English language teachers are expected to use effective teacher talk, however, teacher education courses do not always clarify how student teachers can achieve this. This paper advocates that understanding and using effective teacher talk is crucial for successful ELT and as such is a ‘threshold concept’ in TESOL. ‘Threshold concept’ is a term used in higher education to describe core concepts that once understood, transform perception of a subject and help students progress in their discipline. In this study nine NS and NNS EFL student teachers explore their use of teacher talk by participating in stimulated recall interviews using recordings of teaching practice lessons as the stimuli. Findings show trainees understand effective teacher talk differently, with some trainees linking it to pedagogical purpose whilst others do not. This study is the first to examine threshold concepts in TESOL and shows it is a useful micro-perspective for developing the TESOL curricula.

AB - English language teachers are expected to use effective teacher talk, however, teacher education courses do not always clarify how student teachers can achieve this. This paper advocates that understanding and using effective teacher talk is crucial for successful ELT and as such is a ‘threshold concept’ in TESOL. ‘Threshold concept’ is a term used in higher education to describe core concepts that once understood, transform perception of a subject and help students progress in their discipline. In this study nine NS and NNS EFL student teachers explore their use of teacher talk by participating in stimulated recall interviews using recordings of teaching practice lessons as the stimuli. Findings show trainees understand effective teacher talk differently, with some trainees linking it to pedagogical purpose whilst others do not. This study is the first to examine threshold concepts in TESOL and shows it is a useful micro-perspective for developing the TESOL curricula.

KW - TESOL

KW - teacher education

KW - teacher talk

KW - threshold concept

U2 - 10.1093/elt/ccw062

DO - 10.1093/elt/ccw062

M3 - Article

VL - 71

SP - 1

EP - 13

JO - ELT Journal

T2 - ELT Journal

JF - ELT Journal

SN - 0951-0893

IS - 2

ER -