Effect of feed particle size and feed processing on morphological characteristics in the small and large intestine of pigs and on adhesion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 in the ileum in vitro

Mette S Hedemann, Lene L Mikkelsen, Patrick Naughton, Bent Borg Jensen

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Abstract

A 2 x 2 factorial experiment with pigs was undertaken to investigate the effect of particle size (fine and coarse) and feed processing (pelleted and nonpelleted) on morphological characteristics in the small intestine, cecum, and colon of pigs and on the adhesion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 to the ileum in vitro. Ninety-six pigs (average BW = 33 +/- 7 kg) were fed the experimental diets. After 4 wk, 24 pigs were selected (six pigs per diet) and euthanized, and tissue samples were taken from the mid and distal small intestine, cecum, and distal colon. The effects of particle size and feed processing on villus height and crypt depth in the small intestine were minor. Feeding coarse diets increased (P = 0.05) the crypt depth in the colon. The crypt depth was 420 +/- 12 and 449 +/- 12 microm in pigs fed finely and coarsely ground feed, respectively. Pigs fed pelleted diets had a larger (P = 0.01) staining area for neutral mucins, as well as for acidic and sulfomucins on the villi of the distal small intestine than pigs fed nonpelleted diets. The area was 41, 46, and 33% larger for neutral, acidic, and sulfomucins, respectively. The mucin-staining areas of the crypts in the cecum and the colon were not affected by the experimental diets. Examination of lectin binding characteristics of the distal small intestine and the cecum did not reveal any differences between the experimental diets. Using a pig intestine organ culture model, Salmonella adhered less (P <0.05) to the ileal tissue of pigs fed the nonpelleted diets than to those fed pelleted diets; the adherence was 60% less in these pigs. Results of this study suggest that pigs fed pelleted diets secrete mucins that are capable of binding Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 and thereby allowing for colonization. Therefore, pigs fed a nonpelleted diet are better protected against Salmonella infections than pigs fed a pelleted diet.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1554-1562
JournalJournal of Animal Science
Volume83
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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feed processing
Salmonella enterica
Large Intestine
large intestine
Ileum
Particle Size
Salmonella Typhimurium
ileum
Small Intestine
adhesion
small intestine
particle size
Swine
swine
Diet
pelleted feeds
Cecum
diet
cecum
colon

Cite this

@article{c430f97fd23340b6ae01bd9816321a42,
title = "Effect of feed particle size and feed processing on morphological characteristics in the small and large intestine of pigs and on adhesion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 in the ileum in vitro",
abstract = "A 2 x 2 factorial experiment with pigs was undertaken to investigate the effect of particle size (fine and coarse) and feed processing (pelleted and nonpelleted) on morphological characteristics in the small intestine, cecum, and colon of pigs and on the adhesion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 to the ileum in vitro. Ninety-six pigs (average BW = 33 +/- 7 kg) were fed the experimental diets. After 4 wk, 24 pigs were selected (six pigs per diet) and euthanized, and tissue samples were taken from the mid and distal small intestine, cecum, and distal colon. The effects of particle size and feed processing on villus height and crypt depth in the small intestine were minor. Feeding coarse diets increased (P = 0.05) the crypt depth in the colon. The crypt depth was 420 +/- 12 and 449 +/- 12 microm in pigs fed finely and coarsely ground feed, respectively. Pigs fed pelleted diets had a larger (P = 0.01) staining area for neutral mucins, as well as for acidic and sulfomucins on the villi of the distal small intestine than pigs fed nonpelleted diets. The area was 41, 46, and 33{\%} larger for neutral, acidic, and sulfomucins, respectively. The mucin-staining areas of the crypts in the cecum and the colon were not affected by the experimental diets. Examination of lectin binding characteristics of the distal small intestine and the cecum did not reveal any differences between the experimental diets. Using a pig intestine organ culture model, Salmonella adhered less (P <0.05) to the ileal tissue of pigs fed the nonpelleted diets than to those fed pelleted diets; the adherence was 60{\%} less in these pigs. Results of this study suggest that pigs fed pelleted diets secrete mucins that are capable of binding Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 and thereby allowing for colonization. Therefore, pigs fed a nonpelleted diet are better protected against Salmonella infections than pigs fed a pelleted diet.",
author = "Hedemann, {Mette S} and Mikkelsen, {Lene L} and Patrick Naughton and Jensen, {Bent Borg}",
year = "2005",
language = "English",
volume = "83",
pages = "1554--1562",
journal = "Journal of Animal Science",
issn = "0021-8812",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of feed particle size and feed processing on morphological characteristics in the small and large intestine of pigs and on adhesion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 in the ileum in vitro

AU - Hedemann, Mette S

AU - Mikkelsen, Lene L

AU - Naughton, Patrick

AU - Jensen, Bent Borg

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - A 2 x 2 factorial experiment with pigs was undertaken to investigate the effect of particle size (fine and coarse) and feed processing (pelleted and nonpelleted) on morphological characteristics in the small intestine, cecum, and colon of pigs and on the adhesion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 to the ileum in vitro. Ninety-six pigs (average BW = 33 +/- 7 kg) were fed the experimental diets. After 4 wk, 24 pigs were selected (six pigs per diet) and euthanized, and tissue samples were taken from the mid and distal small intestine, cecum, and distal colon. The effects of particle size and feed processing on villus height and crypt depth in the small intestine were minor. Feeding coarse diets increased (P = 0.05) the crypt depth in the colon. The crypt depth was 420 +/- 12 and 449 +/- 12 microm in pigs fed finely and coarsely ground feed, respectively. Pigs fed pelleted diets had a larger (P = 0.01) staining area for neutral mucins, as well as for acidic and sulfomucins on the villi of the distal small intestine than pigs fed nonpelleted diets. The area was 41, 46, and 33% larger for neutral, acidic, and sulfomucins, respectively. The mucin-staining areas of the crypts in the cecum and the colon were not affected by the experimental diets. Examination of lectin binding characteristics of the distal small intestine and the cecum did not reveal any differences between the experimental diets. Using a pig intestine organ culture model, Salmonella adhered less (P <0.05) to the ileal tissue of pigs fed the nonpelleted diets than to those fed pelleted diets; the adherence was 60% less in these pigs. Results of this study suggest that pigs fed pelleted diets secrete mucins that are capable of binding Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 and thereby allowing for colonization. Therefore, pigs fed a nonpelleted diet are better protected against Salmonella infections than pigs fed a pelleted diet.

AB - A 2 x 2 factorial experiment with pigs was undertaken to investigate the effect of particle size (fine and coarse) and feed processing (pelleted and nonpelleted) on morphological characteristics in the small intestine, cecum, and colon of pigs and on the adhesion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 to the ileum in vitro. Ninety-six pigs (average BW = 33 +/- 7 kg) were fed the experimental diets. After 4 wk, 24 pigs were selected (six pigs per diet) and euthanized, and tissue samples were taken from the mid and distal small intestine, cecum, and distal colon. The effects of particle size and feed processing on villus height and crypt depth in the small intestine were minor. Feeding coarse diets increased (P = 0.05) the crypt depth in the colon. The crypt depth was 420 +/- 12 and 449 +/- 12 microm in pigs fed finely and coarsely ground feed, respectively. Pigs fed pelleted diets had a larger (P = 0.01) staining area for neutral mucins, as well as for acidic and sulfomucins on the villi of the distal small intestine than pigs fed nonpelleted diets. The area was 41, 46, and 33% larger for neutral, acidic, and sulfomucins, respectively. The mucin-staining areas of the crypts in the cecum and the colon were not affected by the experimental diets. Examination of lectin binding characteristics of the distal small intestine and the cecum did not reveal any differences between the experimental diets. Using a pig intestine organ culture model, Salmonella adhered less (P <0.05) to the ileal tissue of pigs fed the nonpelleted diets than to those fed pelleted diets; the adherence was 60% less in these pigs. Results of this study suggest that pigs fed pelleted diets secrete mucins that are capable of binding Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 and thereby allowing for colonization. Therefore, pigs fed a nonpelleted diet are better protected against Salmonella infections than pigs fed a pelleted diet.

M3 - Article

VL - 83

SP - 1554

EP - 1562

JO - Journal of Animal Science

T2 - Journal of Animal Science

JF - Journal of Animal Science

SN - 0021-8812

IS - 7

ER -