Effect of alpha lipoic acid and exercise training on cardiovascular disease risk in obesity with impaired glucose tolerance

Andrea M McNeilly, Gareth W Davison, Marie H Murphy, Nida Nadeem, Tom Trinick, Ellie Duly, Anna Novials, Jane McEneny

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Obese subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are more susceptible than healthy individuals to oxidativestress and cardiovascular disease. This randomised controlled investigation was designed to test the hypothesisthat a-lipoic acid supplementation and exercise training may elicit favourable clinical changes in obese subjectswith IGT. All data were collected from 24 obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) IGT patients. Following participant randomisationinto two groups, fasting venous blood samples were obtained at baseline, and before and following intervention.The first group consisted of 12 participants who completed a 12 week control phase followed by 12 weeks ofchronic exercise at 65% HRmax for 30 minutes a day, 5 days per week, while ingesting 1 gram per day of a-lipoicacid for 12 weeks. The second group consisted of 12 participants who completed the same 12 week control phase,but this was followed by 12 weeks of 1 gram per day of a-lipoic acid supplementation only (no exercise). Themain findings show a comparatively greater rate of low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in the group consistingof a-lipoic acid only (p <0.05 vs. pre intervention), although total oxidant status was lower post intervention (p 0.05). Thesefindings report that a-lipoic acid ingestion may increase the atherogenicity of LDL when ingested in isolation ofexercise, suggesting that in IGT the use of this antioxidant treatment does not ameliorate metabolic disturbances,but instead may detrimentally contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and development of CVD.However, when a-lipoic acid is combined with exercise, this atherogenic effect is abolished.
LanguageEnglish
Pages217-226
JournalLipids in Health and Disease
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Jan 2011

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Thioctic Acid
Glucose Intolerance
Cardiovascular Diseases
Obesity
Exercise
Glucose
Phase control
LDL Lipoproteins
Oxidants
Chemical vapor deposition
Fasting
Atherosclerosis
Blood
Eating
Antioxidants
Oxidation

Cite this

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abstract = "Obese subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are more susceptible than healthy individuals to oxidativestress and cardiovascular disease. This randomised controlled investigation was designed to test the hypothesisthat a-lipoic acid supplementation and exercise training may elicit favourable clinical changes in obese subjectswith IGT. All data were collected from 24 obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) IGT patients. Following participant randomisationinto two groups, fasting venous blood samples were obtained at baseline, and before and following intervention.The first group consisted of 12 participants who completed a 12 week control phase followed by 12 weeks ofchronic exercise at 65{\%} HRmax for 30 minutes a day, 5 days per week, while ingesting 1 gram per day of a-lipoicacid for 12 weeks. The second group consisted of 12 participants who completed the same 12 week control phase,but this was followed by 12 weeks of 1 gram per day of a-lipoic acid supplementation only (no exercise). Themain findings show a comparatively greater rate of low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in the group consistingof a-lipoic acid only (p <0.05 vs. pre intervention), although total oxidant status was lower post intervention (p 0.05). Thesefindings report that a-lipoic acid ingestion may increase the atherogenicity of LDL when ingested in isolation ofexercise, suggesting that in IGT the use of this antioxidant treatment does not ameliorate metabolic disturbances,but instead may detrimentally contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and development of CVD.However, when a-lipoic acid is combined with exercise, this atherogenic effect is abolished.",
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Effect of alpha lipoic acid and exercise training on cardiovascular disease risk in obesity with impaired glucose tolerance. / McNeilly, Andrea M; Davison, Gareth W; Murphy, Marie H; Nadeem, Nida; Trinick, Tom; Duly, Ellie; Novials, Anna; McEneny, Jane.

In: Lipids in Health and Disease, Vol. 10, No. 1, 29.01.2011, p. 217-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - McNeilly, Andrea M

AU - Davison, Gareth W

AU - Murphy, Marie H

AU - Nadeem, Nida

AU - Trinick, Tom

AU - Duly, Ellie

AU - Novials, Anna

AU - McEneny, Jane

PY - 2011/1/29

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N2 - Obese subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are more susceptible than healthy individuals to oxidativestress and cardiovascular disease. This randomised controlled investigation was designed to test the hypothesisthat a-lipoic acid supplementation and exercise training may elicit favourable clinical changes in obese subjectswith IGT. All data were collected from 24 obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) IGT patients. Following participant randomisationinto two groups, fasting venous blood samples were obtained at baseline, and before and following intervention.The first group consisted of 12 participants who completed a 12 week control phase followed by 12 weeks ofchronic exercise at 65% HRmax for 30 minutes a day, 5 days per week, while ingesting 1 gram per day of a-lipoicacid for 12 weeks. The second group consisted of 12 participants who completed the same 12 week control phase,but this was followed by 12 weeks of 1 gram per day of a-lipoic acid supplementation only (no exercise). Themain findings show a comparatively greater rate of low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in the group consistingof a-lipoic acid only (p <0.05 vs. pre intervention), although total oxidant status was lower post intervention (p 0.05). Thesefindings report that a-lipoic acid ingestion may increase the atherogenicity of LDL when ingested in isolation ofexercise, suggesting that in IGT the use of this antioxidant treatment does not ameliorate metabolic disturbances,but instead may detrimentally contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and development of CVD.However, when a-lipoic acid is combined with exercise, this atherogenic effect is abolished.

AB - Obese subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are more susceptible than healthy individuals to oxidativestress and cardiovascular disease. This randomised controlled investigation was designed to test the hypothesisthat a-lipoic acid supplementation and exercise training may elicit favourable clinical changes in obese subjectswith IGT. All data were collected from 24 obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) IGT patients. Following participant randomisationinto two groups, fasting venous blood samples were obtained at baseline, and before and following intervention.The first group consisted of 12 participants who completed a 12 week control phase followed by 12 weeks ofchronic exercise at 65% HRmax for 30 minutes a day, 5 days per week, while ingesting 1 gram per day of a-lipoicacid for 12 weeks. The second group consisted of 12 participants who completed the same 12 week control phase,but this was followed by 12 weeks of 1 gram per day of a-lipoic acid supplementation only (no exercise). Themain findings show a comparatively greater rate of low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in the group consistingof a-lipoic acid only (p <0.05 vs. pre intervention), although total oxidant status was lower post intervention (p 0.05). Thesefindings report that a-lipoic acid ingestion may increase the atherogenicity of LDL when ingested in isolation ofexercise, suggesting that in IGT the use of this antioxidant treatment does not ameliorate metabolic disturbances,but instead may detrimentally contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and development of CVD.However, when a-lipoic acid is combined with exercise, this atherogenic effect is abolished.

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