'Eadar a’ Chlach is an Sgrath: ‘Òran Anyox’ mar òran in-imrich is às-imrich taobh siar Chanada' ('Between the Rock and the Turf: 'Song of Anyox' as an immigration and out-migratoin song from the Canadian West')

Iain S. MacPherson

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    In this paper from the bi-annual Scottish Gaelic conference series "Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 6" ("Gaelic Research 6"), the author examines a never-before published Gaelic song-poem composed/written in the Canadian west and collected by the author from Gaelic-speaking Canadian informants in the 1990s. The song-poem is remarkable in that it enacts the tri-partite moves of emigration/immigration from the Western Isles in the 1920s to Western Canadian prairie homesteads; then an act of out-migration from the prairies to the west coast of British Columbia; and final a projected return migration event back to the Glasgow metropolitan centre (second city of Empire) the speaker sees as his final destination. By using recent theories of 'ecriture migrante' and migration studies in general, the author sujbects 'Òran Anyox' to a close critical reading bolstered by the above critical apparatuses and buttressed by the work of Harold Innis concerning staple colonial economies in empires and the pull and push of centre-periphery modules of migration studies in general. The paper is written in Gaelic.
    LanguageEnglish
    Title of host publicationRannsachadh na Gàidhlig 6: Conference Proceedings
    Place of PublicationAberdeen
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

    Fingerprint

    Song
    Rock
    Immigration
    Prairie
    Poem
    Scottish Gaelic
    British Columbia
    Return Migration
    Centre-periphery
    Informants
    1920s
    Economy
    Module
    Glasgow
    1990s
    Metropolitan
    Emigration
    Critical Apparatus
    Coast
    Colonies

    Keywords

    • Gaelic song-poems
    • emigration/immigration from the Western Isles
    • Scotland
    • 1920s
    • Western Canada

    Cite this

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    title = "'Eadar a’ Chlach is an Sgrath: ‘{\`O}ran Anyox’ mar {\`o}ran in-imrich is {\`a}s-imrich taobh siar Chanada' ('Between the Rock and the Turf: 'Song of Anyox' as an immigration and out-migratoin song from the Canadian West')",
    abstract = "In this paper from the bi-annual Scottish Gaelic conference series {"}Rannsachadh na G{\`a}idhlig 6{"} ({"}Gaelic Research 6{"}), the author examines a never-before published Gaelic song-poem composed/written in the Canadian west and collected by the author from Gaelic-speaking Canadian informants in the 1990s. The song-poem is remarkable in that it enacts the tri-partite moves of emigration/immigration from the Western Isles in the 1920s to Western Canadian prairie homesteads; then an act of out-migration from the prairies to the west coast of British Columbia; and final a projected return migration event back to the Glasgow metropolitan centre (second city of Empire) the speaker sees as his final destination. By using recent theories of 'ecriture migrante' and migration studies in general, the author sujbects '{\`O}ran Anyox' to a close critical reading bolstered by the above critical apparatuses and buttressed by the work of Harold Innis concerning staple colonial economies in empires and the pull and push of centre-periphery modules of migration studies in general. The paper is written in Gaelic.",
    keywords = "Gaelic song-poems, emigration/immigration from the Western Isles, Scotland, 1920s, Western Canada",
    author = "MacPherson, {Iain S.}",
    year = "2012",
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    language = "English",
    isbn = "9780952391180",
    booktitle = "Rannsachadh na G{\`a}idhlig 6: Conference Proceedings",

    }

    'Eadar a’ Chlach is an Sgrath: ‘Òran Anyox’ mar òran in-imrich is às-imrich taobh siar Chanada' ('Between the Rock and the Turf: 'Song of Anyox' as an immigration and out-migratoin song from the Canadian West'). / MacPherson, Iain S.

    Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 6: Conference Proceedings. Aberdeen, 2012.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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    AB - In this paper from the bi-annual Scottish Gaelic conference series "Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 6" ("Gaelic Research 6"), the author examines a never-before published Gaelic song-poem composed/written in the Canadian west and collected by the author from Gaelic-speaking Canadian informants in the 1990s. The song-poem is remarkable in that it enacts the tri-partite moves of emigration/immigration from the Western Isles in the 1920s to Western Canadian prairie homesteads; then an act of out-migration from the prairies to the west coast of British Columbia; and final a projected return migration event back to the Glasgow metropolitan centre (second city of Empire) the speaker sees as his final destination. By using recent theories of 'ecriture migrante' and migration studies in general, the author sujbects 'Òran Anyox' to a close critical reading bolstered by the above critical apparatuses and buttressed by the work of Harold Innis concerning staple colonial economies in empires and the pull and push of centre-periphery modules of migration studies in general. The paper is written in Gaelic.

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    KW - emigration/immigration from the Western Isles

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    KW - Western Canada

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    SN - 9780952391180

    BT - Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 6: Conference Proceedings

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