Draft Planning Policy Statement 21: Sustainable Development in the Countryside, Consultation by Planning and Environmental Policy Group, Department of the Environment, Response of the Landscape Institute Northern Ireland branch (LINI)

Emily Smyth, Simon Bell, Pete Mullin

    Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

    Abstract

    In June 2006, LINI made a response to draft PPS14: Sustainable Development in the Countryside, which this draft PPS21 replaces. LINI supported the introduction of Green Belt / Countryside Policy Area policies to all areas outside Development Limits in Northern Ireland which draft PPS14 embodied. The introduction of draft PPS21 in November 2008 immediately reversed this position and has removed Green Belt / Countryside Policy Area designation from all areas in Northern Ireland (except for 5 relatively small and concise areas renamed ’Special Countryside Areas). Draft PPS21 is a policy for ‘sustainable development in the countryside’. The draft PPS21 does not however, state any objectives for sustainable development. The draft PPS21 refers frequently to visual characteristics of design, without stating why these might benefit sustainable development (eg. benefit to economy and health through tourism and well-being). Essential qualities of sustainable design also address location (reduction of fossil fuels through accessibility and shelter, reduction of flooding aggravation etc), self-sufficiency (reduction of travel need for work and food through mixed-use / enterprise, reduction of demand on centralised grid and sewers and instead potential for ecological services and provision of energy to grid), ecological well-being (essential to life sustenance) and heritage(retention and adaption of built stock minimises energy input in development, use of the landscape for food and resources implicates both lifestyle and landscape value, heritage consideration embodies social understanding of place, community, lifestyle and landscape value). Sustainable design and good design are mutually reinforcing. Good design is not just defined by how a building, space or place looks. It is also about whether it is responsive to context, adaptable, uses resources efficiently and delivers value over its whole life. LINI considers that a proposal addressing and benefiting all of these matters mightconstitute sustainable development in the countryside, and that the policies of PPS21 do not sufficiently plan for sustainable development.The overarching policy in PPS21 should require all development in the countryside to demonstrate how it benefits and enhances a sustainable countryside (eg. according to the objectives indicated above). There should be no exceptions. There will continue to be building in the countryside. It is not an issue that necessary development will be permitted, and that unnecessary development must be well-designed to be permitted. All development which is to be permitted must be appropriately and well designed.
    LanguageEnglish
    Number of pages3
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2009

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    environmental policy
    sustainable development
    lifestyle
    self sufficiency
    food
    resource use
    shelter
    accessibility
    fossil fuel
    energy
    planning
    consultation
    policy
    flooding
    tourism
    resource

    Cite this

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    title = "Draft Planning Policy Statement 21: Sustainable Development in the Countryside, Consultation by Planning and Environmental Policy Group, Department of the Environment, Response of the Landscape Institute Northern Ireland branch (LINI)",
    abstract = "In June 2006, LINI made a response to draft PPS14: Sustainable Development in the Countryside, which this draft PPS21 replaces. LINI supported the introduction of Green Belt / Countryside Policy Area policies to all areas outside Development Limits in Northern Ireland which draft PPS14 embodied. The introduction of draft PPS21 in November 2008 immediately reversed this position and has removed Green Belt / Countryside Policy Area designation from all areas in Northern Ireland (except for 5 relatively small and concise areas renamed ’Special Countryside Areas). Draft PPS21 is a policy for ‘sustainable development in the countryside’. The draft PPS21 does not however, state any objectives for sustainable development. The draft PPS21 refers frequently to visual characteristics of design, without stating why these might benefit sustainable development (eg. benefit to economy and health through tourism and well-being). Essential qualities of sustainable design also address location (reduction of fossil fuels through accessibility and shelter, reduction of flooding aggravation etc), self-sufficiency (reduction of travel need for work and food through mixed-use / enterprise, reduction of demand on centralised grid and sewers and instead potential for ecological services and provision of energy to grid), ecological well-being (essential to life sustenance) and heritage(retention and adaption of built stock minimises energy input in development, use of the landscape for food and resources implicates both lifestyle and landscape value, heritage consideration embodies social understanding of place, community, lifestyle and landscape value). Sustainable design and good design are mutually reinforcing. Good design is not just defined by how a building, space or place looks. It is also about whether it is responsive to context, adaptable, uses resources efficiently and delivers value over its whole life. LINI considers that a proposal addressing and benefiting all of these matters mightconstitute sustainable development in the countryside, and that the policies of PPS21 do not sufficiently plan for sustainable development.The overarching policy in PPS21 should require all development in the countryside to demonstrate how it benefits and enhances a sustainable countryside (eg. according to the objectives indicated above). There should be no exceptions. There will continue to be building in the countryside. It is not an issue that necessary development will be permitted, and that unnecessary development must be well-designed to be permitted. All development which is to be permitted must be appropriately and well designed.",
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    N2 - In June 2006, LINI made a response to draft PPS14: Sustainable Development in the Countryside, which this draft PPS21 replaces. LINI supported the introduction of Green Belt / Countryside Policy Area policies to all areas outside Development Limits in Northern Ireland which draft PPS14 embodied. The introduction of draft PPS21 in November 2008 immediately reversed this position and has removed Green Belt / Countryside Policy Area designation from all areas in Northern Ireland (except for 5 relatively small and concise areas renamed ’Special Countryside Areas). Draft PPS21 is a policy for ‘sustainable development in the countryside’. The draft PPS21 does not however, state any objectives for sustainable development. The draft PPS21 refers frequently to visual characteristics of design, without stating why these might benefit sustainable development (eg. benefit to economy and health through tourism and well-being). Essential qualities of sustainable design also address location (reduction of fossil fuels through accessibility and shelter, reduction of flooding aggravation etc), self-sufficiency (reduction of travel need for work and food through mixed-use / enterprise, reduction of demand on centralised grid and sewers and instead potential for ecological services and provision of energy to grid), ecological well-being (essential to life sustenance) and heritage(retention and adaption of built stock minimises energy input in development, use of the landscape for food and resources implicates both lifestyle and landscape value, heritage consideration embodies social understanding of place, community, lifestyle and landscape value). Sustainable design and good design are mutually reinforcing. Good design is not just defined by how a building, space or place looks. It is also about whether it is responsive to context, adaptable, uses resources efficiently and delivers value over its whole life. LINI considers that a proposal addressing and benefiting all of these matters mightconstitute sustainable development in the countryside, and that the policies of PPS21 do not sufficiently plan for sustainable development.The overarching policy in PPS21 should require all development in the countryside to demonstrate how it benefits and enhances a sustainable countryside (eg. according to the objectives indicated above). There should be no exceptions. There will continue to be building in the countryside. It is not an issue that necessary development will be permitted, and that unnecessary development must be well-designed to be permitted. All development which is to be permitted must be appropriately and well designed.

    AB - In June 2006, LINI made a response to draft PPS14: Sustainable Development in the Countryside, which this draft PPS21 replaces. LINI supported the introduction of Green Belt / Countryside Policy Area policies to all areas outside Development Limits in Northern Ireland which draft PPS14 embodied. The introduction of draft PPS21 in November 2008 immediately reversed this position and has removed Green Belt / Countryside Policy Area designation from all areas in Northern Ireland (except for 5 relatively small and concise areas renamed ’Special Countryside Areas). Draft PPS21 is a policy for ‘sustainable development in the countryside’. The draft PPS21 does not however, state any objectives for sustainable development. The draft PPS21 refers frequently to visual characteristics of design, without stating why these might benefit sustainable development (eg. benefit to economy and health through tourism and well-being). Essential qualities of sustainable design also address location (reduction of fossil fuels through accessibility and shelter, reduction of flooding aggravation etc), self-sufficiency (reduction of travel need for work and food through mixed-use / enterprise, reduction of demand on centralised grid and sewers and instead potential for ecological services and provision of energy to grid), ecological well-being (essential to life sustenance) and heritage(retention and adaption of built stock minimises energy input in development, use of the landscape for food and resources implicates both lifestyle and landscape value, heritage consideration embodies social understanding of place, community, lifestyle and landscape value). Sustainable design and good design are mutually reinforcing. Good design is not just defined by how a building, space or place looks. It is also about whether it is responsive to context, adaptable, uses resources efficiently and delivers value over its whole life. LINI considers that a proposal addressing and benefiting all of these matters mightconstitute sustainable development in the countryside, and that the policies of PPS21 do not sufficiently plan for sustainable development.The overarching policy in PPS21 should require all development in the countryside to demonstrate how it benefits and enhances a sustainable countryside (eg. according to the objectives indicated above). There should be no exceptions. There will continue to be building in the countryside. It is not an issue that necessary development will be permitted, and that unnecessary development must be well-designed to be permitted. All development which is to be permitted must be appropriately and well designed.

    M3 - Commissioned report

    BT - Draft Planning Policy Statement 21: Sustainable Development in the Countryside, Consultation by Planning and Environmental Policy Group, Department of the Environment, Response of the Landscape Institute Northern Ireland branch (LINI)

    ER -