Domestic cooking and Food Skills: an island of Ireland perspective

L.E. Hollywood, Moira Dean, Fiona Lavelle, Michelle Spence, Dawn McDowell, Martin Caraher, Monique Raats, Amanda McCloat, E. Mooney

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

Abstract

Introduction: The skills required to prepare food can impact on the choices made by consumers and the healthiness of their diet. Consumers’ increasing reliance on convenience or pre-prepared food and the increase in eating outside of the home environment has led to the demise of cooking skills1-4. This study provides an overview of cooking and food skills and their impact on consumers’ diets of those living the island of Ireland*.

Methods: A three stage mixed methods study was implemented. Stage one included a nationally representative survey (n=1049) to measure cooking and food skills. Stage two explored the barriers and facilitators to cooking using focus groups (n=16). Stage three involved an experimental study (n=141) to explore how consumers learn cooking skills using technology.

Results: Survey results revealed that men, younger adults and those with few or no qualifications were reported to have low cooking and food skills usage and confidence. Greater perceived cooking skills and food skills were not conclusively associated with healthier dietary choices. Focus Group results revealed nine barriers and five facilitators to cooking from scratch. Cooking from scratch cooks highlighted the facilitators to outweighed the barriers. Stage three results found that video technology promoted cooking skills in a number of ways,

namely: visualisation, reassurance, replication, flexibility and selectivity of the cooking process.

Conclusion: Overall, results suggest that enjoyment and confidence are key components of learning new cooking and food skills and the intention to put the learned skills into practice in the future.

Fingerprint

Cooking
Ireland
Islands
Food
Focus Groups
Diet
Technology
Young Adult
Eating
Learning

Cite this

Hollywood, L. E., Dean, M., Lavelle, F., Spence, M., McDowell, D., Caraher, M., ... Mooney, E. (2019). Domestic cooking and Food Skills: an island of Ireland perspective. 1. ICCAS 2019 , Cardiff, United Kingdom.
Hollywood, L.E. ; Dean, Moira ; Lavelle, Fiona ; Spence, Michelle ; McDowell, Dawn ; Caraher, Martin ; Raats, Monique ; McCloat, Amanda ; Mooney, E. / Domestic cooking and Food Skills: an island of Ireland perspective. ICCAS 2019 , Cardiff, United Kingdom.1 p.
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title = "Domestic cooking and Food Skills: an island of Ireland perspective",
abstract = "Introduction: The skills required to prepare food can impact on the choices made by consumers and the healthiness of their diet. Consumers’ increasing reliance on convenience or pre-prepared food and the increase in eating outside of the home environment has led to the demise of cooking skills1-4. This study provides an overview of cooking and food skills and their impact on consumers’ diets of those living the island of Ireland*.Methods: A three stage mixed methods study was implemented. Stage one included a nationally representative survey (n=1049) to measure cooking and food skills. Stage two explored the barriers and facilitators to cooking using focus groups (n=16). Stage three involved an experimental study (n=141) to explore how consumers learn cooking skills using technology.Results: Survey results revealed that men, younger adults and those with few or no qualifications were reported to have low cooking and food skills usage and confidence. Greater perceived cooking skills and food skills were not conclusively associated with healthier dietary choices. Focus Group results revealed nine barriers and five facilitators to cooking from scratch. Cooking from scratch cooks highlighted the facilitators to outweighed the barriers. Stage three results found that video technology promoted cooking skills in a number of ways,namely: visualisation, reassurance, replication, flexibility and selectivity of the cooking process.Conclusion: Overall, results suggest that enjoyment and confidence are key components of learning new cooking and food skills and the intention to put the learned skills into practice in the future.",
author = "L.E. Hollywood and Moira Dean and Fiona Lavelle and Michelle Spence and Dawn McDowell and Martin Caraher and Monique Raats and Amanda McCloat and E. Mooney",
note = "Author confirmed this was not published and does not have an ISSN; ICCAS 2019 : International Conference on Culinary Arts and Sciences , ICCA ; Conference date: 26-06-2019 Through 28-06-2019",
year = "2019",
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Hollywood, LE, Dean, M, Lavelle, F, Spence, M, McDowell, D, Caraher, M, Raats, M, McCloat, A & Mooney, E 2019, 'Domestic cooking and Food Skills: an island of Ireland perspective' ICCAS 2019 , Cardiff, United Kingdom, 26/06/19 - 28/06/19, pp. 1.

Domestic cooking and Food Skills: an island of Ireland perspective. / Hollywood, L.E.; Dean, Moira; Lavelle, Fiona; Spence, Michelle; McDowell, Dawn; Caraher, Martin; Raats, Monique; McCloat, Amanda; Mooney, E.

2019. 1 ICCAS 2019 , Cardiff, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

TY - CONF

T1 - Domestic cooking and Food Skills: an island of Ireland perspective

AU - Hollywood, L.E.

AU - Dean, Moira

AU - Lavelle, Fiona

AU - Spence, Michelle

AU - McDowell, Dawn

AU - Caraher, Martin

AU - Raats, Monique

AU - McCloat, Amanda

AU - Mooney, E.

N1 - Author confirmed this was not published and does not have an ISSN

PY - 2019/6/27

Y1 - 2019/6/27

N2 - Introduction: The skills required to prepare food can impact on the choices made by consumers and the healthiness of their diet. Consumers’ increasing reliance on convenience or pre-prepared food and the increase in eating outside of the home environment has led to the demise of cooking skills1-4. This study provides an overview of cooking and food skills and their impact on consumers’ diets of those living the island of Ireland*.Methods: A three stage mixed methods study was implemented. Stage one included a nationally representative survey (n=1049) to measure cooking and food skills. Stage two explored the barriers and facilitators to cooking using focus groups (n=16). Stage three involved an experimental study (n=141) to explore how consumers learn cooking skills using technology.Results: Survey results revealed that men, younger adults and those with few or no qualifications were reported to have low cooking and food skills usage and confidence. Greater perceived cooking skills and food skills were not conclusively associated with healthier dietary choices. Focus Group results revealed nine barriers and five facilitators to cooking from scratch. Cooking from scratch cooks highlighted the facilitators to outweighed the barriers. Stage three results found that video technology promoted cooking skills in a number of ways,namely: visualisation, reassurance, replication, flexibility and selectivity of the cooking process.Conclusion: Overall, results suggest that enjoyment and confidence are key components of learning new cooking and food skills and the intention to put the learned skills into practice in the future.

AB - Introduction: The skills required to prepare food can impact on the choices made by consumers and the healthiness of their diet. Consumers’ increasing reliance on convenience or pre-prepared food and the increase in eating outside of the home environment has led to the demise of cooking skills1-4. This study provides an overview of cooking and food skills and their impact on consumers’ diets of those living the island of Ireland*.Methods: A three stage mixed methods study was implemented. Stage one included a nationally representative survey (n=1049) to measure cooking and food skills. Stage two explored the barriers and facilitators to cooking using focus groups (n=16). Stage three involved an experimental study (n=141) to explore how consumers learn cooking skills using technology.Results: Survey results revealed that men, younger adults and those with few or no qualifications were reported to have low cooking and food skills usage and confidence. Greater perceived cooking skills and food skills were not conclusively associated with healthier dietary choices. Focus Group results revealed nine barriers and five facilitators to cooking from scratch. Cooking from scratch cooks highlighted the facilitators to outweighed the barriers. Stage three results found that video technology promoted cooking skills in a number of ways,namely: visualisation, reassurance, replication, flexibility and selectivity of the cooking process.Conclusion: Overall, results suggest that enjoyment and confidence are key components of learning new cooking and food skills and the intention to put the learned skills into practice in the future.

M3 - Other

SP - 1

ER -

Hollywood LE, Dean M, Lavelle F, Spence M, McDowell D, Caraher M et al. Domestic cooking and Food Skills: an island of Ireland perspective. 2019. ICCAS 2019 , Cardiff, United Kingdom.