Does audio–visual CPR feedback in public access defibrillators assist untrained lay users to save lives?

Hannah Torney, Rebecca Funston, Colette McIntyre, Laura Davis, Jennifer Adgey

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Introduction: High quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been shown to improve survival outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Some public access defibrillators (PADs) now include audio–visual (AV) CPR feedback to guide lay rescuers to deliver chest compressions as per the international resuscitation guidelines. A retrospective analysis was conducted to determine if the addition of AV CPR feedback improves patient survival rates.

Methods: Patient data collection began in October 2012. Event data was downloaded from the defibrillators after use. Device type, patient demographics and outcome were collected and analysed. Patient records were anonymised prior to data entry and analysis, and were subject to audit. The data was split into two groups (1) PADs without CPR feedback and (2) PADs with CPR feedback.

Results: A total of 819 sudden cardiac arrest events were collected and analysed. Patient ages ranged from less than 1 year old to 101 years old, and 66.7% were male.

A PAD without CPR feedback was deployed for 551 SCAs, 318 (57.7%) of which were witnessed. A total of 496 of these patients received CPR treatment. Where survival was known, 117 (21.2%) patients survived to hospital admission.

A PAD with CPR feedback was deployed for 268 SCAs, 165 (61.6%) of which were witnessed. A total of 238 patients received CPR treatment. Where survival was known, 86 patients survived to hospital admission (32.1%).

Of interest, 93.8% of those using the PAD without CPR feedback were trained in CPR-D, compared to 61.6% of those using the PAD with CPR feedback.

Conclusions: Survival to hospital admission in this analysis is comparable to published literature. Fewer users in the PAD with CPR feedback group were trained in CPR-D, however the survival to hospital admission was greater in this group. This demonstrates that audio-visual CPR feedback does improve survival from OHCA.
Original languageEnglish
Pagese99
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2017

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