Digital Exclusion Despite Digital Accessibility: Empirical Evidence from an English City

Sabrina Bunyan, Alan Collins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study provides a high resolution investigation into the socio-economic determinants of digital exclusion, within a single, densely populated city, where access is less likely to be a barrier to users. It employs data drawn from a representative interview survey of 1,005 households from across the city of Portsmouth, UK. In this study digital exclusion refers to those individuals who do not use the internet either at home, work, place of study or elsewhere. Multivariate statistical analysis identifies those significant factors raising or depressing the probability of being categorised as digitally excluded including, inter alia, age, gender, income, education, disability, tenure, working status, the presence of young people in the household and city neighbourhood districts (‘super groups’).
LanguageEnglish
Pages588-603
JournalTijdschrift voor economische en sociale geografie
Volume104
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 14 Apr 2013

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exclusion
multivariate analysis
statistical analysis
evidence
workplace
disability
district
determinants
Internet
income
gender
interview
economics
education
Group

Keywords

  • digital exclusion
  • internet access
  • U.K.

Cite this

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title = "Digital Exclusion Despite Digital Accessibility: Empirical Evidence from an English City",
abstract = "This study provides a high resolution investigation into the socio-economic determinants of digital exclusion, within a single, densely populated city, where access is less likely to be a barrier to users. It employs data drawn from a representative interview survey of 1,005 households from across the city of Portsmouth, UK. In this study digital exclusion refers to those individuals who do not use the internet either at home, work, place of study or elsewhere. Multivariate statistical analysis identifies those significant factors raising or depressing the probability of being categorised as digitally excluded including, inter alia, age, gender, income, education, disability, tenure, working status, the presence of young people in the household and city neighbourhood districts (‘super groups’).",
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note = "Reference text: Bimber, B. (2000), Measuring the Gender Gap on the Internet. Social Science Quarterly 81, pp. 868–876. Web of Science{\circledR} Times Cited: 98 Bucy, E. P. (2000), Social Access to the Internet. The International Journal of Press Politics 5, pp. 50–61. CrossRef,Web of Science{\circledR} Times Cited: 52 Department of Communities and Local Government (2008), Delivering Digital Inclusion: An Action Plan for Consultation. London: Department of Communities and Local Government. Dutton, W.H. & E.J. Helsper (2007), The Internet in Britain: 2007. Oxford Internet Institute: University of Oxford. Dutton, W.H., E.J. Helsper & M.M. Gerber (2009), The Internet in Britain: 2009. Oxford Internet Institute: University of Oxford. Fairlie, R.W. (2004), Race and the Digital Divide. Contributions to Economic Analysis & Policy 3, pp. 1–38. Freshminds (2008), Understanding Digital Exclusion Research Report. Available at <www.communities.gov.uk/documents/communities/doc/1066166.doc>. Accessed on 1 October 2011. Foley, P. (2004), Does the Internet Help to Overcome Social Exclusion? Electronic Journal of E-Government 2, pp. 139–146. Hargittai, E. (2003), The Digital Divide and What to Do about it. In: D.C. Jones , ed., The New Economy Handbook, pp. 821–831. San Diego, CA: Academic Press. Jackson, L.A., G. Barbatsis, A. von Eye, F.Biocca, Y. Zhao, & H. Fitzgerald (2003), Internet Use in Low-income Families: Implications for the Digital Divide. IT & Society 1, pp. 141–165. Livingstone, S. & E. Helsper (2007), Gradations in Digital Inclusion: Children, Young People, and the Digital Divide. New Media and Society 9, pp.671–696. CrossRef,Web of Science{\circledR} Times Cited: 104 Longley, P.A. & A.D. Singleton (2009), Linking Social Deprivation and Digital Exclusion in England, Urban Studies 46, pp. 1275–1298. CrossRef,Web of Science{\circledR} Times Cited: 5 McKenna, K.Y.A. & J.A. Bargh (2000), Plan 9 from Cyberspace: The Implications of the Internet for Personality and Social Psychology. Personality and Social Psychology Review 4, pp. 57–75. CrossRef,Web of Science{\circledR} Times Cited: 316 Norris, P. (2001), Digital Divide: Civic Engagement, Information Poverty, and the Internet Worldwide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossRef Oecd (2001), Understanding the Digital Divide, OECD Digital Economy Papers, No.49. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/236405667766. Accessed on 28 February 2013. Ono, H. & M. Zavodny (2003), Gender and the Internet. Social Science Quarterly 84, pp. 111–121. Direct Link: AbstractFull Article (HTML)PDF(89K)ReferencesWeb of Science{\circledR} Times Cited: 87 Ono, H., M. Zavodny (2007), Digital Inequality: A Five Country Comparison Using Microdata. Social Science Research 36, pp. 1135–1155. CrossRef,Web of Science{\circledR} Times Cited: 30 Office For National Statistics (ONS) (2009), Statistical Bulletin: Internet Access – Households and Individuals 2009. London: ONS. Office For National Statistics (ONS) (2012a), Statistical Bulletin: Internet Access – Households and Individuals 2012. London: ONS. Office For National Statistics (ONS) (2012b), Regional Profiles: Key Statistics – South East, August 2012. London: ONS. Parayil, G. (2005), The Digital Divide and Increasing Returns: Contradictions of Informational Capitalism. The Information Society 21, pp. 41–51. CrossRef,Web of Science{\circledR} Times Cited: 32 Portsmouth City Council (2010), Portsmouth Population Profile: A Profile of Portsmouth's Population Using Output Area Classification. Portsmouth: Portsmouth City Council. Portsmouth City Council (2012a), The Portsmouth Plan: Portsmouth Core Strategy. Portsmouth: Portsmouth City Council. Portsmouth City Council (2012b), Joint Strategic Needs Assessment: Summary for Commissioners 2012. Portsmouth: Portsmouth City Council. Rubin, D.B. (1977), Formalizing Subjective Notions about the Effect of Nonrespondents in Sample Surveys. Journal of the American Statistical Association 72, pp. 538–543. CrossRef,Web of Science{\circledR} Times Cited: 182 Tabachnick, B.G. & L.S. Fidell (2007), Using Multivariate Statistics, 5th edn. Boston, MA: Pearson Education. Vicente, M.R. & A.J. Lopez (2006), Patterns of ICT diffusion across the European Union. Economic Letters 93, pp. 45–51. CrossRef,Web of Science{\circledR} Times Cited: 19 Vickers, D. & P. Rees (2007), Creating the UK National Statistics 2001 output area classification. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society. Series A 170, pp. 379–403. Direct Link: AbstractFull Article (HTML)PDF(807K)ReferencesWeb of Science{\circledR} Times Cited: 45 Warf, B. (2012), Contemporary Digital Divides in the United States. Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 103, pp. 1–15. Warschauer, M. (2004), Technology and Social Inclusion: Rethinking the Digital Divide. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Winchester, N. (2009), Social Housing and Digital Exclusion. National Housing Federation: London.",
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Digital Exclusion Despite Digital Accessibility: Empirical Evidence from an English City. / Bunyan, Sabrina; Collins, Alan.

In: Tijdschrift voor economische en sociale geografie, Vol. 104, No. 5, 14.04.2013, p. 588-603.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Bunyan, Sabrina

AU - Collins, Alan

N1 - Reference text: Bimber, B. (2000), Measuring the Gender Gap on the Internet. Social Science Quarterly 81, pp. 868–876. Web of Science® Times Cited: 98 Bucy, E. P. (2000), Social Access to the Internet. The International Journal of Press Politics 5, pp. 50–61. CrossRef,Web of Science® Times Cited: 52 Department of Communities and Local Government (2008), Delivering Digital Inclusion: An Action Plan for Consultation. London: Department of Communities and Local Government. Dutton, W.H. & E.J. Helsper (2007), The Internet in Britain: 2007. Oxford Internet Institute: University of Oxford. Dutton, W.H., E.J. Helsper & M.M. Gerber (2009), The Internet in Britain: 2009. Oxford Internet Institute: University of Oxford. Fairlie, R.W. (2004), Race and the Digital Divide. Contributions to Economic Analysis & Policy 3, pp. 1–38. Freshminds (2008), Understanding Digital Exclusion Research Report. Available at <www.communities.gov.uk/documents/communities/doc/1066166.doc>. Accessed on 1 October 2011. Foley, P. (2004), Does the Internet Help to Overcome Social Exclusion? Electronic Journal of E-Government 2, pp. 139–146. Hargittai, E. (2003), The Digital Divide and What to Do about it. In: D.C. Jones , ed., The New Economy Handbook, pp. 821–831. San Diego, CA: Academic Press. Jackson, L.A., G. Barbatsis, A. von Eye, F.Biocca, Y. Zhao, & H. Fitzgerald (2003), Internet Use in Low-income Families: Implications for the Digital Divide. IT & Society 1, pp. 141–165. Livingstone, S. & E. Helsper (2007), Gradations in Digital Inclusion: Children, Young People, and the Digital Divide. New Media and Society 9, pp.671–696. CrossRef,Web of Science® Times Cited: 104 Longley, P.A. & A.D. Singleton (2009), Linking Social Deprivation and Digital Exclusion in England, Urban Studies 46, pp. 1275–1298. CrossRef,Web of Science® Times Cited: 5 McKenna, K.Y.A. & J.A. Bargh (2000), Plan 9 from Cyberspace: The Implications of the Internet for Personality and Social Psychology. Personality and Social Psychology Review 4, pp. 57–75. CrossRef,Web of Science® Times Cited: 316 Norris, P. (2001), Digital Divide: Civic Engagement, Information Poverty, and the Internet Worldwide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossRef Oecd (2001), Understanding the Digital Divide, OECD Digital Economy Papers, No.49. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/236405667766. Accessed on 28 February 2013. Ono, H. & M. Zavodny (2003), Gender and the Internet. Social Science Quarterly 84, pp. 111–121. Direct Link: AbstractFull Article (HTML)PDF(89K)ReferencesWeb of Science® Times Cited: 87 Ono, H., M. Zavodny (2007), Digital Inequality: A Five Country Comparison Using Microdata. Social Science Research 36, pp. 1135–1155. CrossRef,Web of Science® Times Cited: 30 Office For National Statistics (ONS) (2009), Statistical Bulletin: Internet Access – Households and Individuals 2009. London: ONS. Office For National Statistics (ONS) (2012a), Statistical Bulletin: Internet Access – Households and Individuals 2012. London: ONS. Office For National Statistics (ONS) (2012b), Regional Profiles: Key Statistics – South East, August 2012. London: ONS. Parayil, G. (2005), The Digital Divide and Increasing Returns: Contradictions of Informational Capitalism. The Information Society 21, pp. 41–51. CrossRef,Web of Science® Times Cited: 32 Portsmouth City Council (2010), Portsmouth Population Profile: A Profile of Portsmouth's Population Using Output Area Classification. Portsmouth: Portsmouth City Council. Portsmouth City Council (2012a), The Portsmouth Plan: Portsmouth Core Strategy. Portsmouth: Portsmouth City Council. Portsmouth City Council (2012b), Joint Strategic Needs Assessment: Summary for Commissioners 2012. Portsmouth: Portsmouth City Council. Rubin, D.B. (1977), Formalizing Subjective Notions about the Effect of Nonrespondents in Sample Surveys. Journal of the American Statistical Association 72, pp. 538–543. CrossRef,Web of Science® Times Cited: 182 Tabachnick, B.G. & L.S. Fidell (2007), Using Multivariate Statistics, 5th edn. Boston, MA: Pearson Education. Vicente, M.R. & A.J. Lopez (2006), Patterns of ICT diffusion across the European Union. Economic Letters 93, pp. 45–51. CrossRef,Web of Science® Times Cited: 19 Vickers, D. & P. Rees (2007), Creating the UK National Statistics 2001 output area classification. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society. Series A 170, pp. 379–403. Direct Link: AbstractFull Article (HTML)PDF(807K)ReferencesWeb of Science® Times Cited: 45 Warf, B. (2012), Contemporary Digital Divides in the United States. Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 103, pp. 1–15. Warschauer, M. (2004), Technology and Social Inclusion: Rethinking the Digital Divide. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Winchester, N. (2009), Social Housing and Digital Exclusion. National Housing Federation: London.

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