Digestion and Colonic Fermentation of Raw and Cooked Opuntia ficus-indica Cladodes Impacts Bioaccessibility and Bioactivity

Elsy De Santiago, Chris IR Gill, Ilaria Carafa, Kieran Tuohy, María Paz De Peña, Concepcion Cid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The bioactivity of (poly)phenols from a food is an interplay between the cooking methods applied and the interaction of the food with the gastrointestinal tract. The (poly)phenolic profile and biological activity of raw and cooked cactus ( Opuntia ficus-indica Mill.) cladodes following in vitro digestion and colonic fermentation were evaluated. Twenty-seven (poly)phenols were identified and quantified by HPLC-ESI-MS, with piscidic acid being the most abundant. Throughout the colonic fermentation, flavonoids showed more degradation than phenolic acids, and eucomic acid remained the most relevant after 24 h. The catabolite 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid was generated after 24 h of fermentation. Cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and cell cycle analyses were performed in HT29 cells. Cactus colonic fermentates showed higher cell viability (≥80%) in comparison to the control fermentation with no cactus and significantly ( p < 0.05) reduced H2O2-induced DNA damage in HT29 cells. Results suggest that, although phenolic compounds were degraded during the colonic fermentation, the biological activity is retained in colon cells
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2490-2499
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume67
Issue number9
Early online date13 Feb 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • DNA damage
  • Opuntia ficus-indica
  • antioxidant activity
  • cytotoxicity
  • gut microbiota
  • polyphenols

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Digestion and Colonic Fermentation of Raw and Cooked Opuntia ficus-indica Cladodes Impacts Bioaccessibility and Bioactivity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this