DEVELOPMENTS IN LARGE SCALE ADDITIVE MANUFACTURE – THE POTENTIAL AND LIMITATIONS OF WIRE ARC ADDITIVE MANUFACTURE AND ASSOCIATED TECHNOLOGIES

S McFadden, Richard Ward, JP Quinn

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Abstract

Additive manufacturing (AM) is different from traditional subtractive or formative manufacturing processes. Building from the ‘bottom up’ layer by layer as opposed to forming by machining, removing material from a billet, or casting AM offers a high material utilization rate. This paper reviews recent developments in AM technologies, focusing on those techniques which have the capability of producing medium to high complexity larger scale parts within reasonable cycle times. Wire arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) is an AM method which uses a metal wire feedstock and an electric arc heat source to form the component. WAAM can offer a relatively high deposition rate (>10kg /hr) with resolution ≈ 1mm. The paper examines current WAAM technologies, exploring the parameters required to achieve process efficacy, including, management of stresses, deposition orientation and sensor inclusion for process control. It will be demonstrated that WAAM offers a realistic alternative to traditional manufacturing methods due to the potential for high deposition rates, relatively low equipment costs and ability to produce components with good mechanical properties.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jul 2018
EventThe 35th International Manufacturing Conference - Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin, Ireland
Duration: 20 Jun 201820 Jun 2018
http://www.manufacturingcouncil.ie/about.php

Conference

ConferenceThe 35th International Manufacturing Conference
Abbreviated titleIMC35
CountryIreland
CityDublin
Period20/06/1820/06/18
Internet address

Keywords

  • Additive Manufacture
  • WAAM

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