Development of Synaptic Boutons in Layer 4 of the Barrel Field of the Rat Somatosensory Cortex: A Quantitative Analysis.

Amandine Dufour, Astrid Rollenhagen, Kurt Saetzler, Joachim H R. Lübke

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Understanding the structural and functional mechanisms underlying the development of individual brain microcircuits is critical for elucidating their computational properties. As synapses are the key structures defining a given microcircuit, it is imperative to investigate their development and precise structural features. Here, synapses in cortical layer 4 were analyzed throughout the first postnatal month using high-end electron microscopy to generate realistic quantitative 3D models. Besides their overall geometry, the size of active zones and the pools of synaptic vesicles were analyzed. At postnatal day 2 only a few shaft synapses were found, but spine synapses steadily increased with ongoing corticogenesis. From postnatal day 2 to 30 synaptic boutons significantly decreased in size whereas that of active zones remained nearly unchanged despite a reshaping. During the first 2 weeks of postnatal development, a rearrangement of synaptic vesicles from a loose distribution toward a densely packed organization close to the presynaptic density was observed, accompanied by the formation of, first a putative readily releasable pool and later a recycling and reserve pool. The quantitative 3D reconstructions of synapses will enable the comparison of structural and functional aspects of signal transduction thus leading to a better understanding of networks in the developing neocortex.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages838-854
    JournalCerebral Cortex
    Volume26
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2015

    Fingerprint

    Somatosensory Cortex
    Presynaptic Terminals
    Synapses
    Synaptic Vesicles
    Neocortex
    Recycling
    Signal Transduction
    Electron Microscopy
    Spine
    Brain

    Keywords

    • 3D reconstructions
    • electron microscopy
    • pool of synaptic vesicles
    • synapse geometry
    • synaptogenesis

    Cite this

    Dufour, Amandine ; Rollenhagen, Astrid ; Saetzler, Kurt ; Lübke, Joachim H R. / Development of Synaptic Boutons in Layer 4 of the Barrel Field of the Rat Somatosensory Cortex: A Quantitative Analysis. In: Cerebral Cortex. 2015 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 838-854.
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    Development of Synaptic Boutons in Layer 4 of the Barrel Field of the Rat Somatosensory Cortex: A Quantitative Analysis. / Dufour, Amandine; Rollenhagen, Astrid; Saetzler, Kurt; Lübke, Joachim H R.

    In: Cerebral Cortex, Vol. 26, No. 2, 11.2015, p. 838-854.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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