Determining the spring constant of arbitrarily shaped cantilevers in viscous environments

Amir Farokh Payam, W Trewby, Kislon Voitchovsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Accurate calibration of the flexural spring constant of microcantilevers is crucial for sensing devices, microactuators, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Existing methods rely on precise knowledge of cantilever geometry, make significant simplifications, or require potentially damaging contact with the sample. Here, we develop a simple equation to calculate the flexural spring constants of arbitrarily shaped cantilevers in fluid. Our approach, verified here with AFM, only requires the measurement of two resonance frequencies of the cantilever in air and in a liquid, with no need for additional input or knowledge about the system. We validate the method with cantilevers of different shapes and compare its predictions with existing models. We also show how the method's accuracy can be considerably improved, especially in more viscous liquids, if the effective width of the cantilever is known. Significantly, the developed equations can be extended to calculate the spring constants of the cantilever's higher eigenmodes.
LanguageEnglish
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume112
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Feb 2018

Fingerprint

atomic force microscopy
liquids
simplification
fluids
air
geometry
predictions

Keywords

  • Electrical properties and parameters
  • Cantilever
  • Lasers
  • Lab-on-a-chip
  • Signal processing
  • Atomic force microscopy
  • Viscous liquid
  • Electronic noise
  • Organic compounds
  • Microactuators

Cite this

@article{cc9050ebca5c4b5db526b6bb25c73957,
title = "Determining the spring constant of arbitrarily shaped cantilevers in viscous environments",
abstract = "Accurate calibration of the flexural spring constant of microcantilevers is crucial for sensing devices, microactuators, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Existing methods rely on precise knowledge of cantilever geometry, make significant simplifications, or require potentially damaging contact with the sample. Here, we develop a simple equation to calculate the flexural spring constants of arbitrarily shaped cantilevers in fluid. Our approach, verified here with AFM, only requires the measurement of two resonance frequencies of the cantilever in air and in a liquid, with no need for additional input or knowledge about the system. We validate the method with cantilevers of different shapes and compare its predictions with existing models. We also show how the method's accuracy can be considerably improved, especially in more viscous liquids, if the effective width of the cantilever is known. Significantly, the developed equations can be extended to calculate the spring constants of the cantilever's higher eigenmodes.",
keywords = "Electrical properties and parameters, Cantilever, Lasers, Lab-on-a-chip, Signal processing, Atomic force microscopy, Viscous liquid, Electronic noise, Organic compounds, Microactuators",
author = "{Farokh Payam}, Amir and W Trewby and Kislon Voitchovsky",
note = "Evidence attached this paper was made OA at Durham University",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1063/1.5009071",
language = "English",
volume = "112",
journal = "Applied Physics Letters",
issn = "0003-6951",
number = "8",

}

Determining the spring constant of arbitrarily shaped cantilevers in viscous environments. / Farokh Payam, Amir; Trewby, W; Voitchovsky, Kislon.

In: Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 112, No. 8, 19.02.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Determining the spring constant of arbitrarily shaped cantilevers in viscous environments

AU - Farokh Payam, Amir

AU - Trewby, W

AU - Voitchovsky, Kislon

N1 - Evidence attached this paper was made OA at Durham University

PY - 2018/2/19

Y1 - 2018/2/19

N2 - Accurate calibration of the flexural spring constant of microcantilevers is crucial for sensing devices, microactuators, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Existing methods rely on precise knowledge of cantilever geometry, make significant simplifications, or require potentially damaging contact with the sample. Here, we develop a simple equation to calculate the flexural spring constants of arbitrarily shaped cantilevers in fluid. Our approach, verified here with AFM, only requires the measurement of two resonance frequencies of the cantilever in air and in a liquid, with no need for additional input or knowledge about the system. We validate the method with cantilevers of different shapes and compare its predictions with existing models. We also show how the method's accuracy can be considerably improved, especially in more viscous liquids, if the effective width of the cantilever is known. Significantly, the developed equations can be extended to calculate the spring constants of the cantilever's higher eigenmodes.

AB - Accurate calibration of the flexural spring constant of microcantilevers is crucial for sensing devices, microactuators, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Existing methods rely on precise knowledge of cantilever geometry, make significant simplifications, or require potentially damaging contact with the sample. Here, we develop a simple equation to calculate the flexural spring constants of arbitrarily shaped cantilevers in fluid. Our approach, verified here with AFM, only requires the measurement of two resonance frequencies of the cantilever in air and in a liquid, with no need for additional input or knowledge about the system. We validate the method with cantilevers of different shapes and compare its predictions with existing models. We also show how the method's accuracy can be considerably improved, especially in more viscous liquids, if the effective width of the cantilever is known. Significantly, the developed equations can be extended to calculate the spring constants of the cantilever's higher eigenmodes.

KW - Electrical properties and parameters

KW - Cantilever

KW - Lasers

KW - Lab-on-a-chip

KW - Signal processing

KW - Atomic force microscopy

KW - Viscous liquid

KW - Electronic noise

KW - Organic compounds

KW - Microactuators

U2 - 10.1063/1.5009071

DO - 10.1063/1.5009071

M3 - Article

VL - 112

JO - Applied Physics Letters

T2 - Applied Physics Letters

JF - Applied Physics Letters

SN - 0003-6951

IS - 8

ER -