DETECTING SLANT-IN-DEPTH OF REAL TRAPEZOIDAL AND RECTANGULAR SURFACES - MOVING-MONOCULAR VIEWING EQUIVALENT TO STATIONARY-BINOCULAR VIEWING

Anthony Reinhardt-Rutland

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Cues from binocularity and observer motion are often believed to be more important in perceiving depth than pictorial cues such as relative visual size and linear perspective. Both binocularity and motion are effective in simulated displays. However, for real stimuli evincing nonveridical pictorial cues, binocularity has been more effective than motion; sometimes motion has had an insignificant effect. This may reflect inadequate extent of motion, an assertion investigated in the present study Two groups of observers determined whether rectangular and trapezoidal surfaces were slanted-in-depth under stationary-monocular (SM), stationary-binocular (SB), and moving-monocular conditions with 15-cm (15MM) and 25-cm (25MM) lateral head-motion extents according to group. The trapezoidal surfaces appeared as rectangular during SM viewing to mislead regarding slant. The effect of pictorial cues was substantially diminished during SB viewing whereas 15MM viewing was weak, 25MM was as effective as SB viewing. Comparison of the overall numbers of correct responses for the two groups indicated no contextual biasing.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages177-185
    JournalJournal of General Psychology
    Volume120
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 1993

    Fingerprint

    Cues

    Cite this

    @article{824d192e94184c2d8ff4119c66b76a26,
    title = "DETECTING SLANT-IN-DEPTH OF REAL TRAPEZOIDAL AND RECTANGULAR SURFACES - MOVING-MONOCULAR VIEWING EQUIVALENT TO STATIONARY-BINOCULAR VIEWING",
    abstract = "Cues from binocularity and observer motion are often believed to be more important in perceiving depth than pictorial cues such as relative visual size and linear perspective. Both binocularity and motion are effective in simulated displays. However, for real stimuli evincing nonveridical pictorial cues, binocularity has been more effective than motion; sometimes motion has had an insignificant effect. This may reflect inadequate extent of motion, an assertion investigated in the present study Two groups of observers determined whether rectangular and trapezoidal surfaces were slanted-in-depth under stationary-monocular (SM), stationary-binocular (SB), and moving-monocular conditions with 15-cm (15MM) and 25-cm (25MM) lateral head-motion extents according to group. The trapezoidal surfaces appeared as rectangular during SM viewing to mislead regarding slant. The effect of pictorial cues was substantially diminished during SB viewing whereas 15MM viewing was weak, 25MM was as effective as SB viewing. Comparison of the overall numbers of correct responses for the two groups indicated no contextual biasing.",
    author = "Anthony Reinhardt-Rutland",
    year = "1993",
    month = "4",
    language = "English",
    volume = "120",
    pages = "177--185",
    journal = "Journal of General Psychology",
    issn = "0022-1309",
    number = "2",

    }

    DETECTING SLANT-IN-DEPTH OF REAL TRAPEZOIDAL AND RECTANGULAR SURFACES - MOVING-MONOCULAR VIEWING EQUIVALENT TO STATIONARY-BINOCULAR VIEWING. / Reinhardt-Rutland, Anthony.

    In: Journal of General Psychology, Vol. 120, No. 2, 04.1993, p. 177-185.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - DETECTING SLANT-IN-DEPTH OF REAL TRAPEZOIDAL AND RECTANGULAR SURFACES - MOVING-MONOCULAR VIEWING EQUIVALENT TO STATIONARY-BINOCULAR VIEWING

    AU - Reinhardt-Rutland, Anthony

    PY - 1993/4

    Y1 - 1993/4

    N2 - Cues from binocularity and observer motion are often believed to be more important in perceiving depth than pictorial cues such as relative visual size and linear perspective. Both binocularity and motion are effective in simulated displays. However, for real stimuli evincing nonveridical pictorial cues, binocularity has been more effective than motion; sometimes motion has had an insignificant effect. This may reflect inadequate extent of motion, an assertion investigated in the present study Two groups of observers determined whether rectangular and trapezoidal surfaces were slanted-in-depth under stationary-monocular (SM), stationary-binocular (SB), and moving-monocular conditions with 15-cm (15MM) and 25-cm (25MM) lateral head-motion extents according to group. The trapezoidal surfaces appeared as rectangular during SM viewing to mislead regarding slant. The effect of pictorial cues was substantially diminished during SB viewing whereas 15MM viewing was weak, 25MM was as effective as SB viewing. Comparison of the overall numbers of correct responses for the two groups indicated no contextual biasing.

    AB - Cues from binocularity and observer motion are often believed to be more important in perceiving depth than pictorial cues such as relative visual size and linear perspective. Both binocularity and motion are effective in simulated displays. However, for real stimuli evincing nonveridical pictorial cues, binocularity has been more effective than motion; sometimes motion has had an insignificant effect. This may reflect inadequate extent of motion, an assertion investigated in the present study Two groups of observers determined whether rectangular and trapezoidal surfaces were slanted-in-depth under stationary-monocular (SM), stationary-binocular (SB), and moving-monocular conditions with 15-cm (15MM) and 25-cm (25MM) lateral head-motion extents according to group. The trapezoidal surfaces appeared as rectangular during SM viewing to mislead regarding slant. The effect of pictorial cues was substantially diminished during SB viewing whereas 15MM viewing was weak, 25MM was as effective as SB viewing. Comparison of the overall numbers of correct responses for the two groups indicated no contextual biasing.

    M3 - Article

    VL - 120

    SP - 177

    EP - 185

    JO - Journal of General Psychology

    T2 - Journal of General Psychology

    JF - Journal of General Psychology

    SN - 0022-1309

    IS - 2

    ER -