Dark Matter

Research output: Non-textual formExhibition

Abstract

Approximately 90% of the Universe’s matter remains as yet undetected, physicists speculate that this undetectable matter, which they labelled ‘dark matter’ as it does not emit light, must exist in order to account for the universe’s current structure. The distribution of this ‘dark matter’ in the universe was recently depicted in a 3D computer model. At the same time approximately 40,000 tons of space junk orbit the earth, left over from rocket launches and space missions over the last 50 years. This matter is constantly monitored by scientists as the re entry of any of these particles into earth’s atmosphere could have catastrophic consequences. Like the speculations over ‘dark matter’, and the concerns over space debris this drawing installation attempts to present a series of theoretical but narrative spaces that convey the humour and irony of such scientific investigations into space.

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dark matter
universe
space debris
reentry
Earth atmosphere
space missions
rockets
installing
orbits

Cite this

@misc{21e47c5e97504cbbac490cbdd8da4e20,
title = "Dark Matter",
abstract = "Approximately 90{\%} of the Universe’s matter remains as yet undetected, physicists speculate that this undetectable matter, which they labelled ‘dark matter’ as it does not emit light, must exist in order to account for the universe’s current structure. The distribution of this ‘dark matter’ in the universe was recently depicted in a 3D computer model. At the same time approximately 40,000 tons of space junk orbit the earth, left over from rocket launches and space missions over the last 50 years. This matter is constantly monitored by scientists as the re entry of any of these particles into earth’s atmosphere could have catastrophic consequences. Like the speculations over ‘dark matter’, and the concerns over space debris this drawing installation attempts to present a series of theoretical but narrative spaces that convey the humour and irony of such scientific investigations into space.",
author = "Aisling O'Beirn",
note = "CamouFLASHED Mediations Curators: Mariusz Soltysik, Aurelia Mandziuk, Anja Tabitha Rudolph, Roland Dolfing Event in frame of Month of Mediations - MEDIATIONS Biennial, 3-30 of October 2008, Poznan, Poland Outputmediatype: Installation",
year = "2007",
month = "9",
language = "English",

}

O'Beirn, A, Dark Matter, 2007, Exhibition.
Dark Matter. O'Beirn, Aisling (Author). 2007. Event: CamouFLASHED Mediations Biennale, Poznań, Poland.

Research output: Non-textual formExhibition

TY - ADVS

T1 - Dark Matter

AU - O'Beirn, Aisling

N1 - CamouFLASHED Mediations Curators: Mariusz Soltysik, Aurelia Mandziuk, Anja Tabitha Rudolph, Roland Dolfing Event in frame of Month of Mediations - MEDIATIONS Biennial, 3-30 of October 2008, Poznan, Poland Outputmediatype: Installation

PY - 2007/9

Y1 - 2007/9

N2 - Approximately 90% of the Universe’s matter remains as yet undetected, physicists speculate that this undetectable matter, which they labelled ‘dark matter’ as it does not emit light, must exist in order to account for the universe’s current structure. The distribution of this ‘dark matter’ in the universe was recently depicted in a 3D computer model. At the same time approximately 40,000 tons of space junk orbit the earth, left over from rocket launches and space missions over the last 50 years. This matter is constantly monitored by scientists as the re entry of any of these particles into earth’s atmosphere could have catastrophic consequences. Like the speculations over ‘dark matter’, and the concerns over space debris this drawing installation attempts to present a series of theoretical but narrative spaces that convey the humour and irony of such scientific investigations into space.

AB - Approximately 90% of the Universe’s matter remains as yet undetected, physicists speculate that this undetectable matter, which they labelled ‘dark matter’ as it does not emit light, must exist in order to account for the universe’s current structure. The distribution of this ‘dark matter’ in the universe was recently depicted in a 3D computer model. At the same time approximately 40,000 tons of space junk orbit the earth, left over from rocket launches and space missions over the last 50 years. This matter is constantly monitored by scientists as the re entry of any of these particles into earth’s atmosphere could have catastrophic consequences. Like the speculations over ‘dark matter’, and the concerns over space debris this drawing installation attempts to present a series of theoretical but narrative spaces that convey the humour and irony of such scientific investigations into space.

M3 - Exhibition

ER -