Correspondence between self-ratings and key-workers' ratings of depression in adults with mild learning disabilities

Michael Gordon, Mark Shevlin, Kevin J. Tierney, Brendan Bunting, Timothy Trimble

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. This study assessed the association between self-ratings and key-worker ratings of depression in people with mild learning disabilities. Method. The Zung Depression Scale was completed by 74 adults with mild learning disabilities and a modified version of the questionnaire was completed by two key-workers at two periods in time. Results. The correlations between ratings of depression by key-workers were high and key-worker ratings correlated significantly with self-rating. The depression scores were found to be temporally stable. Conclusions. The findings suggest that proxy raters appear to be able to make reliable and valid judgements about other people's self-reported levels of depression.
LanguageEnglish
Pages491-495
JournalBritish Journal of Clinical Psychology
Volume46
Issue numberPart 4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2007

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Learning Disorders
Depression
Proxy

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abstract = "Objective. This study assessed the association between self-ratings and key-worker ratings of depression in people with mild learning disabilities. Method. The Zung Depression Scale was completed by 74 adults with mild learning disabilities and a modified version of the questionnaire was completed by two key-workers at two periods in time. Results. The correlations between ratings of depression by key-workers were high and key-worker ratings correlated significantly with self-rating. The depression scores were found to be temporally stable. Conclusions. The findings suggest that proxy raters appear to be able to make reliable and valid judgements about other people's self-reported levels of depression.",
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Correspondence between self-ratings and key-workers' ratings of depression in adults with mild learning disabilities. / Gordon, Michael; Shevlin, Mark; Tierney, Kevin J.; Bunting, Brendan; Trimble, Timothy.

In: British Journal of Clinical Psychology, Vol. 46, No. Part 4, 11.2007, p. 491-495.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Trimble, Timothy

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AB - Objective. This study assessed the association between self-ratings and key-worker ratings of depression in people with mild learning disabilities. Method. The Zung Depression Scale was completed by 74 adults with mild learning disabilities and a modified version of the questionnaire was completed by two key-workers at two periods in time. Results. The correlations between ratings of depression by key-workers were high and key-worker ratings correlated significantly with self-rating. The depression scores were found to be temporally stable. Conclusions. The findings suggest that proxy raters appear to be able to make reliable and valid judgements about other people's self-reported levels of depression.

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