Control of Magnesium Alloy Corrosion by Bioactive Calcium Phosphate Coating: Implications for Resorbable Orthopaedic Implants

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Control of the corrosion that occurs in magnesium alloys in vivo is a significant challenge for their use as resorbable orthopaedic implants. In this work, we report on the provision of bioactive calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings on magnesium alloys that can delay substrate corrosion while offering an attendant physiochemical environment with properties known to promote an osteoinductive response in vivo. RF magnetron sputtering from hydroxyapatite (HA) powder targets has been employed to create CaP coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy substrates. Coatings of ∼70 and 210 nm thickness were achieved via regulation of sputtering parameters, in particular deposition time. XPS and ToF-SIMS were used to investigate the chemistry of the coating alloy interface and also to confirm composition and thickness. The Ca/P atomic ratio of the coatings was determined by EDX to be 1.54. µCT analysis showed a substrate volume loss after 14 days exposure to SBF of 5.89 ± 3.15 mm 3 for the un-coated alloy while the presence of the ∼70 nm CaP coating reduced this to 3.42 ± 0.48 mm 3 and the ∼210 nm coating to 0.30 ± 0.28 mm 3 . The corrosion rates were calculated to be 1.74 ± 0.06 mmpy for the AZ31 control; 1.57 ± 0.09 mmpy for the ∼70 nm CaP coated alloy and 1.01 ± 0.07 mmpy for the ∼210 nm CaP coating. This data confirms that CaP coating thickness can control the rate of corrosion of magnesium alloys while offering the potential for improved bioactivity.

LanguageEnglish
Article number100291
JournalMaterialia
Volume6
Issue numberC
Early online date12 Mar 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

Fingerprint

Phosphate coatings
Orthopedics
Calcium phosphate
Magnesium alloys
Corrosion
Coatings
Substrates
Thickness control
Secondary ion mass spectrometry
Bioactivity
Corrosion rate
Hydroxyapatite
Magnetron sputtering
Sputtering
calcium phosphate
Energy dispersive spectroscopy
X ray photoelectron spectroscopy
Durapatite
Powders
Chemical analysis

Keywords

  • magnesium alloy
  • RF magnetron
  • calcium phosphate coating
  • corrosion
  • biomaterial
  • Corrosion
  • Magnesium alloy
  • Biomaterial
  • Calcium phosphate coatings

Cite this

@article{d5cb3ecb6c2d4c418353d3d7d5548175,
title = "Control of Magnesium Alloy Corrosion by Bioactive Calcium Phosphate Coating: Implications for Resorbable Orthopaedic Implants",
abstract = "Control of the corrosion that occurs in magnesium alloys in vivo is a significant challenge for their use as resorbable orthopaedic implants. In this work, we report on the provision of bioactive calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings on magnesium alloys that can delay substrate corrosion while offering an attendant physiochemical environment with properties known to promote an osteoinductive response in vivo. RF magnetron sputtering from hydroxyapatite (HA) powder targets has been employed to create CaP coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy substrates. Coatings of ∼70 and 210 nm thickness were achieved via regulation of sputtering parameters, in particular deposition time. XPS and ToF-SIMS were used to investigate the chemistry of the coating alloy interface and also to confirm composition and thickness. The Ca/P atomic ratio of the coatings was determined by EDX to be 1.54. µCT analysis showed a substrate volume loss after 14 days exposure to SBF of 5.89 ± 3.15 mm 3 for the un-coated alloy while the presence of the ∼70 nm CaP coating reduced this to 3.42 ± 0.48 mm 3 and the ∼210 nm coating to 0.30 ± 0.28 mm 3 . The corrosion rates were calculated to be 1.74 ± 0.06 mmpy for the AZ31 control; 1.57 ± 0.09 mmpy for the ∼70 nm CaP coated alloy and 1.01 ± 0.07 mmpy for the ∼210 nm CaP coating. This data confirms that CaP coating thickness can control the rate of corrosion of magnesium alloys while offering the potential for improved bioactivity.",
keywords = "magnesium alloy, RF magnetron, calcium phosphate coating, corrosion, biomaterial, Corrosion, Magnesium alloy, Biomaterial, Calcium phosphate coatings",
author = "Jonathan Acheson and Stephen McKillop and P Lemoine and A Boyd and BJ Meenan",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.mtla.2019.100291",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
journal = "Materialia",
issn = "2589-1529",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "C",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Control of Magnesium Alloy Corrosion by Bioactive Calcium Phosphate Coating: Implications for Resorbable Orthopaedic Implants

AU - Acheson, Jonathan

AU - McKillop, Stephen

AU - Lemoine, P

AU - Boyd, A

AU - Meenan, BJ

PY - 2019/6

Y1 - 2019/6

N2 - Control of the corrosion that occurs in magnesium alloys in vivo is a significant challenge for their use as resorbable orthopaedic implants. In this work, we report on the provision of bioactive calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings on magnesium alloys that can delay substrate corrosion while offering an attendant physiochemical environment with properties known to promote an osteoinductive response in vivo. RF magnetron sputtering from hydroxyapatite (HA) powder targets has been employed to create CaP coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy substrates. Coatings of ∼70 and 210 nm thickness were achieved via regulation of sputtering parameters, in particular deposition time. XPS and ToF-SIMS were used to investigate the chemistry of the coating alloy interface and also to confirm composition and thickness. The Ca/P atomic ratio of the coatings was determined by EDX to be 1.54. µCT analysis showed a substrate volume loss after 14 days exposure to SBF of 5.89 ± 3.15 mm 3 for the un-coated alloy while the presence of the ∼70 nm CaP coating reduced this to 3.42 ± 0.48 mm 3 and the ∼210 nm coating to 0.30 ± 0.28 mm 3 . The corrosion rates were calculated to be 1.74 ± 0.06 mmpy for the AZ31 control; 1.57 ± 0.09 mmpy for the ∼70 nm CaP coated alloy and 1.01 ± 0.07 mmpy for the ∼210 nm CaP coating. This data confirms that CaP coating thickness can control the rate of corrosion of magnesium alloys while offering the potential for improved bioactivity.

AB - Control of the corrosion that occurs in magnesium alloys in vivo is a significant challenge for their use as resorbable orthopaedic implants. In this work, we report on the provision of bioactive calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings on magnesium alloys that can delay substrate corrosion while offering an attendant physiochemical environment with properties known to promote an osteoinductive response in vivo. RF magnetron sputtering from hydroxyapatite (HA) powder targets has been employed to create CaP coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy substrates. Coatings of ∼70 and 210 nm thickness were achieved via regulation of sputtering parameters, in particular deposition time. XPS and ToF-SIMS were used to investigate the chemistry of the coating alloy interface and also to confirm composition and thickness. The Ca/P atomic ratio of the coatings was determined by EDX to be 1.54. µCT analysis showed a substrate volume loss after 14 days exposure to SBF of 5.89 ± 3.15 mm 3 for the un-coated alloy while the presence of the ∼70 nm CaP coating reduced this to 3.42 ± 0.48 mm 3 and the ∼210 nm coating to 0.30 ± 0.28 mm 3 . The corrosion rates were calculated to be 1.74 ± 0.06 mmpy for the AZ31 control; 1.57 ± 0.09 mmpy for the ∼70 nm CaP coated alloy and 1.01 ± 0.07 mmpy for the ∼210 nm CaP coating. This data confirms that CaP coating thickness can control the rate of corrosion of magnesium alloys while offering the potential for improved bioactivity.

KW - magnesium alloy

KW - RF magnetron

KW - calcium phosphate coating

KW - corrosion

KW - biomaterial

KW - Corrosion

KW - Magnesium alloy

KW - Biomaterial

KW - Calcium phosphate coatings

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85063282897&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.mtla.2019.100291

DO - 10.1016/j.mtla.2019.100291

M3 - Article

VL - 6

JO - Materialia

T2 - Materialia

JF - Materialia

SN - 2589-1529

IS - C

M1 - 100291

ER -