Contaminating the past in the theatre of Martin Lynch.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Locating Lynch in the tradition of John McGrath’s popular theatre allows his work to be seen as both recovering working class experience and, crucially, probing mythologies that have justified and perpetuated political violence. The paper is focused particularly on two of Lynch’s most recent works: Holding Hands at Paschendale (2006) and The Long Kesh Chronicles (2009).
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
Number of pages11
Publication statusPublished - 2011
EventRadical Irish Theatre Symposium - Liverpool Hope University, Liverpool
Duration: 1 Jan 2011 → …

Other

OtherRadical Irish Theatre Symposium
Period1/01/11 → …

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Chronicles
Mythology
Political Violence
Popular Theatre
Working Class

Cite this

@inproceedings{d5aa745d775347ba96385ff788c7a174,
title = "Contaminating the past in the theatre of Martin Lynch.",
abstract = "Locating Lynch in the tradition of John McGrath’s popular theatre allows his work to be seen as both recovering working class experience and, crucially, probing mythologies that have justified and perpetuated political violence. The paper is focused particularly on two of Lynch’s most recent works: Holding Hands at Paschendale (2006) and The Long Kesh Chronicles (2009).",
author = "Tom Maguire",
year = "2011",
language = "English",
booktitle = "Unknown Host Publication",

}

Maguire, T 2011, Contaminating the past in the theatre of Martin Lynch. in Unknown Host Publication. Radical Irish Theatre Symposium, 1/01/11.

Contaminating the past in the theatre of Martin Lynch. / Maguire, Tom.

Unknown Host Publication. 2011.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AB - Locating Lynch in the tradition of John McGrath’s popular theatre allows his work to be seen as both recovering working class experience and, crucially, probing mythologies that have justified and perpetuated political violence. The paper is focused particularly on two of Lynch’s most recent works: Holding Hands at Paschendale (2006) and The Long Kesh Chronicles (2009).

M3 - Conference contribution

BT - Unknown Host Publication

ER -