Computer usage and the validity of self-assessed computer competence among first-year business students

Joan Ballantine, Patricia McCourt Larres, Peter Oyelere

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluates the reliability of self-assessment as a measure of computer competence. This evaluation is carried out in response to recent research which has employed self-reported ratings as the sole indicator of students’ computer competence. To evaluate the reliability of self-assessed computer competence, the scores achieved by students in self-assessed computer competence tests are compared with scores achieved in objective tests. The results reveal a statistically significantly over-estimation of computer competence among the students surveyed. Furthermore, reported pre-university computer experience in terms of home and school use and formal IT education does not affect this result. The findings call into question the validity of using self-assessment as a measure of computer competence. More generally, the study also provides an up-to-date picture of self-reported computer usage and IT experience among pre-university students from New Zealand and South-east Asia and contrasts these findings with those from previous research.
LanguageEnglish
Pages976-990
JournalComputers and Education
Volume49
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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Students
Industry
student
self-assessment
university
New Zealand
experience
Education
rating
evaluation
school
education

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Ballantine, Joan ; McCourt Larres, Patricia ; Oyelere, Peter. / Computer usage and the validity of self-assessed computer competence among first-year business students. 2007 ; Vol. 49, No. 4. pp. 976-990.
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Computer usage and the validity of self-assessed computer competence among first-year business students. / Ballantine, Joan; McCourt Larres, Patricia; Oyelere, Peter.

Vol. 49, No. 4, 2007, p. 976-990.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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