Competing Drivers of Hybridity: Third Sector Housing Organisations in Northern Ireland

Nicholas Acheson, David Mullins

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    Hybridisation is sometimes considered as a purposeful adaptive response by organisations to a turbulent environment, for example by charities moving to more market or trading based methods of income generation (Smith 2010). The importance of external drivers arising from change in the public policy and funding environment is also increasingly recognised (Harris 2010). What is less well researched are the messy processes whereby organisational adaptation occurs in an incremental way and in specific political contexts, influenced simultaneously by competing public, market and community logics that drive hybridisation at sector and organisational levels.This paper draws on recent work with third sector housing and support organisations in Northern Ireland undertaken in the new political context associated with the restoration of accountability to the NI Assembly. It investigates the competing influences of i) moves towards greater democratic accountability to the devolved Northern Ireland Assembly ii) policies to promote voluntary and community sector involvement in public service delivery (the NI Concordat) and iii) grant –based commissioning of housing support and welfare services in the fields of mental health and homelessness. It explores how these competing influences affect organisational adaptation strategies. The role of agency and how this is articulated through incremental adaptation decisions for long term sector hybridisation are explored through case studies of the enactment of policies on Supporting People in the fields of mental health and homelessness.
    LanguageEnglish
    Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
    Pages1-34
    Number of pages34
    Publication statusPublished - 14 Sep 2012
    EventInternational Social Innovation Research Conference - Birmingham
    Duration: 14 Sep 2012 → …

    Conference

    ConferenceInternational Social Innovation Research Conference
    Period14/09/12 → …

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    driver
    housing
    homelessness
    concordat
    mental health
    responsibility
    market
    restoration
    community
    public service
    grant
    public policy
    welfare
    funding
    income

    Cite this

    Acheson, N., & Mullins, D. (2012). Competing Drivers of Hybridity: Third Sector Housing Organisations in Northern Ireland. In Unknown Host Publication (pp. 1-34)
    Acheson, Nicholas ; Mullins, David. / Competing Drivers of Hybridity: Third Sector Housing Organisations in Northern Ireland. Unknown Host Publication. 2012. pp. 1-34
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    title = "Competing Drivers of Hybridity: Third Sector Housing Organisations in Northern Ireland",
    abstract = "Hybridisation is sometimes considered as a purposeful adaptive response by organisations to a turbulent environment, for example by charities moving to more market or trading based methods of income generation (Smith 2010). The importance of external drivers arising from change in the public policy and funding environment is also increasingly recognised (Harris 2010). What is less well researched are the messy processes whereby organisational adaptation occurs in an incremental way and in specific political contexts, influenced simultaneously by competing public, market and community logics that drive hybridisation at sector and organisational levels.This paper draws on recent work with third sector housing and support organisations in Northern Ireland undertaken in the new political context associated with the restoration of accountability to the NI Assembly. It investigates the competing influences of i) moves towards greater democratic accountability to the devolved Northern Ireland Assembly ii) policies to promote voluntary and community sector involvement in public service delivery (the NI Concordat) and iii) grant –based commissioning of housing support and welfare services in the fields of mental health and homelessness. It explores how these competing influences affect organisational adaptation strategies. The role of agency and how this is articulated through incremental adaptation decisions for long term sector hybridisation are explored through case studies of the enactment of policies on Supporting People in the fields of mental health and homelessness.",
    author = "Nicholas Acheson and David Mullins",
    note = "Reference text: Acheson, N. (2010) ‘Welfare State reform and restructuring relations between the state and the voluntary sector: Reflections on Northern Ireland evidence’, Voluntary Sector Review 1 (2); 30 Acheson, N. (2011) Hybridization in Complex Policy Fields: a Case Study of ‘Supporting People’ in Northern Ireland, Paper presented at the National Council for Voluntary Organisations/Voluntary Sector Studies Network conference, London. Billis, D. (2010) ‘Towards a Theory of Hybrid Organisations’ in Billis, D. (ed.) Hybrid Organisations and the Third Sector: Challenges for Practice, Theory and Policy, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Birrell, D. (2009) The Impact of Devolution on Social Policy, Bristol: The Policy Press. Blessing, A. (2012) ‘Magical or Monstrous? Hybridity in Social Housing Governance’, Housing Studies 27(2): 189-207. Bratt, R. (2012) The Quadruple Bottom Line and NonProfit Housing Organisations in the United States. Housing Studies 27, 4: 438-456. Buckingham, H. (2009) Competition and contracts in the voluntary sector: exploring the implications for homelessness service providers in Southampton. Policy and Politics 37.2 pp 235-254. Buckingham H. (2011) Hybridity, diversity and the division of labour in the third sector: what can we learn from homelessness organisations in the UK?. Voluntary Sector Review 2.2: 157-175. Carr, H. (2005) ‘‘Some-one to Watch over me’: Making Supported Housing Work’, Social and Legal Studies 14, 387-408. Clarke, J., J. Newman, N. Smith, E. Vidler, L. Westmarland (2008) Creating Citizen Consumers, London, Thousand Oaks CA: Sage Publications. Devine, P., G. Kelly, G. Robinson (2011) An Age of Change? Community Relations in Northern Ireland, ARK Research Update 72, Belfast: ARK. DFP NI (2012) Memorandum on the Third Report of the Public Accounts Committee: Creating Effective Partnerships between Government and the Voluntary and Community Sector, Belfast: Department of Finance and Personnel. 31 DHSSSP (2005) A Strategic Framework for Adult Mental Health Services, Belfast: Department for Health, Social Services and Public Safety. DHSSSP (2007) Promoting the Social Inclusion of People with a Mental Health Problem or a Learning Disability, Belfast: Department for Health, Social Services and Public Safety. DSDNI (2011a) Concordat between the Voluntary and Community Sector and the Northern Ireland Government, Belfast: Department for Social Development. DSDNI (2011b) Evaluation of the Impact of the Supporting People Policy and its administration. Belfast: Department for Social Development. DSDNI (2012) Northern Ireland Supporting People Guidance, Belfast: Department for Social Development. Giddens, A (1998) The Third Way: The Renewal of Social Democracy. Cambridge, Polity. Gray, A.M., D. Birrell (2012) ‘Coalition Government and Northern Ireland: Social Policy and the Lowest Common Denominator Thesis’, Social Policy and Society 11 (1) 15-26. Harris, M. (2010) Third Sector Organisations in a Contradictory Policy Environment in Billis, D. (ed.) Hybrid Organisations and the Third Sector: Challenges for Practice, Theory and Policy, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Horgan, G., A.M.Gray (2012) ‘Devolution in Northern Ireland: a Lost Opportunity?’, Critical Social Policy 32 (3) 467-478. Kerlin J.A. (2006) Social Enterprise in the United States and Europe: Understanding and Learning from the Differences. Voluntas 17: 247-263. Minkoff, D. (2002). The emergence of hybrid organisational forms: Combining identity based service provision and political action. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 31, 377–401. Muir, J. and Mullins, D. (2012) The governance of change: Procurement of social housing in Northern Ireland. Housing Studies Association Conference, York, April 2012. 32 Mullins, D. (2011) Third Sector Partnerships for Service Delivery: Case Study Report – Housing Partnerships and Consortia in Northern Ireland, Birmingham: Third Sector Research Centre. Mullins, D. Czischke, D. and van Bortel, G. (2012) Exploring the meaning of hybridity and social enterprise in housing organisations. Housing Studies 27, 4: 405-417. Mullins, D. and Pawson, H. (2010) ‘Housing associations: agents of policy or profits in disguise?’ in Billis, D. (ed.) Hybrid Organisations and the Third Sector: Challenges or Practice, Theory and Policy, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Mullins, D., Rhodes, M.L. & Williamson, A. (2001) ‘Organisational Fields and Third Sector Housing in Ireland, North and South’, Voluntas Vol. 12 no. 3:.257-278. NCVO, (2012) The UK Civil Society Almanac, London: National Council for Voluntary Organisations. NIAO (2010) Creating Effective Partnerships between Government and the Voluntary and Community Sector. Belfast: Northern Ireland Audit Office. NICVA (2012) State of the Sector VI, Belfast: Northern Ireland Council for Voluntary Action. NIE (2012) Programme for Government 2011-15, Belfast: Northern Ireland Executive. NIHE (2005) Northern Ireland Supporting People strategy 2005-10. Belfast: Northern Ireland Housing Executive. NIHE (2012) Homelessness Strategy for Northern Ireland 2012-17, Belfast: Northern Ireland Housing Executive. Nolan, P. (2012) Northern Ireland Peace Monitoring Report, Number one, Belfast: Community Relations Council. 33 North Harbour Consulting (2012) Strategic Review of Supported Accommodation Schemes for Homeless People in Northern Ireland funded by the Supporting People Programme. Belfast: Northern Ireland Housing Executive. PAC NI 2012 Report on Creating Effective Partnerships between Government and the Voluntary and Community Sector, Belfast: Northern Ireland Assembly. Parr, S. (2010) The Role of Social Housing in the ‘Care and Control’ of Tenants with Mental Health Problems, Social Policy and Society, 9 (1) 111-122. Rees, J., Mullins, D. and Bovaird, T. (2012a) Third Sector Partnerships for Service Delivery: an evidence review. TSRC Working Paper 60. University of Birmingham. Rees, J. Mullins, D. Bovaird, T. ( 2012b) Third Sector Partnerships for Service Delivery: Principles, Models and Trends: Exploration of Organisational and Sector Case Studies TSRC Final Project Report. University of Birmingham. Sacranie, H. (2012) Hybridity Enacted in a Large English Housing Association: A Tale of Strategy, Culture and Community Investment. . Housing Studies 27, 4: 533-552. Smith, S. R. (2010) Hybridization and nonprofit organisations: The governance challenge. Policy and Society 29 (2010) 219–229. Teasdale, S. (2012) Negotiating tensions: How do Social Enterprises in the Homelessness Field Balance Social and Commercial Considerations? . Housing Studies 27, 4: 514-532. Zimmeck, M. (2010) The Compact 10 years on: government's approach to partnership with the voluntary and community sector in England. Voluntary Sector Review, Volume 1, Number 1, March 2010: 125-133(9).",
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    Acheson, N & Mullins, D 2012, Competing Drivers of Hybridity: Third Sector Housing Organisations in Northern Ireland. in Unknown Host Publication. pp. 1-34, International Social Innovation Research Conference, 14/09/12.

    Competing Drivers of Hybridity: Third Sector Housing Organisations in Northern Ireland. / Acheson, Nicholas; Mullins, David.

    Unknown Host Publication. 2012. p. 1-34.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    TY - GEN

    T1 - Competing Drivers of Hybridity: Third Sector Housing Organisations in Northern Ireland

    AU - Acheson, Nicholas

    AU - Mullins, David

    N1 - Reference text: Acheson, N. (2010) ‘Welfare State reform and restructuring relations between the state and the voluntary sector: Reflections on Northern Ireland evidence’, Voluntary Sector Review 1 (2); 30 Acheson, N. (2011) Hybridization in Complex Policy Fields: a Case Study of ‘Supporting People’ in Northern Ireland, Paper presented at the National Council for Voluntary Organisations/Voluntary Sector Studies Network conference, London. Billis, D. (2010) ‘Towards a Theory of Hybrid Organisations’ in Billis, D. (ed.) Hybrid Organisations and the Third Sector: Challenges for Practice, Theory and Policy, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Birrell, D. (2009) The Impact of Devolution on Social Policy, Bristol: The Policy Press. Blessing, A. (2012) ‘Magical or Monstrous? Hybridity in Social Housing Governance’, Housing Studies 27(2): 189-207. Bratt, R. (2012) The Quadruple Bottom Line and NonProfit Housing Organisations in the United States. Housing Studies 27, 4: 438-456. Buckingham, H. (2009) Competition and contracts in the voluntary sector: exploring the implications for homelessness service providers in Southampton. Policy and Politics 37.2 pp 235-254. Buckingham H. (2011) Hybridity, diversity and the division of labour in the third sector: what can we learn from homelessness organisations in the UK?. Voluntary Sector Review 2.2: 157-175. Carr, H. (2005) ‘‘Some-one to Watch over me’: Making Supported Housing Work’, Social and Legal Studies 14, 387-408. Clarke, J., J. Newman, N. Smith, E. Vidler, L. Westmarland (2008) Creating Citizen Consumers, London, Thousand Oaks CA: Sage Publications. Devine, P., G. Kelly, G. Robinson (2011) An Age of Change? Community Relations in Northern Ireland, ARK Research Update 72, Belfast: ARK. DFP NI (2012) Memorandum on the Third Report of the Public Accounts Committee: Creating Effective Partnerships between Government and the Voluntary and Community Sector, Belfast: Department of Finance and Personnel. 31 DHSSSP (2005) A Strategic Framework for Adult Mental Health Services, Belfast: Department for Health, Social Services and Public Safety. DHSSSP (2007) Promoting the Social Inclusion of People with a Mental Health Problem or a Learning Disability, Belfast: Department for Health, Social Services and Public Safety. DSDNI (2011a) Concordat between the Voluntary and Community Sector and the Northern Ireland Government, Belfast: Department for Social Development. DSDNI (2011b) Evaluation of the Impact of the Supporting People Policy and its administration. Belfast: Department for Social Development. DSDNI (2012) Northern Ireland Supporting People Guidance, Belfast: Department for Social Development. Giddens, A (1998) The Third Way: The Renewal of Social Democracy. Cambridge, Polity. Gray, A.M., D. Birrell (2012) ‘Coalition Government and Northern Ireland: Social Policy and the Lowest Common Denominator Thesis’, Social Policy and Society 11 (1) 15-26. Harris, M. (2010) Third Sector Organisations in a Contradictory Policy Environment in Billis, D. (ed.) Hybrid Organisations and the Third Sector: Challenges for Practice, Theory and Policy, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Horgan, G., A.M.Gray (2012) ‘Devolution in Northern Ireland: a Lost Opportunity?’, Critical Social Policy 32 (3) 467-478. Kerlin J.A. (2006) Social Enterprise in the United States and Europe: Understanding and Learning from the Differences. Voluntas 17: 247-263. Minkoff, D. (2002). The emergence of hybrid organisational forms: Combining identity based service provision and political action. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 31, 377–401. Muir, J. and Mullins, D. (2012) The governance of change: Procurement of social housing in Northern Ireland. Housing Studies Association Conference, York, April 2012. 32 Mullins, D. (2011) Third Sector Partnerships for Service Delivery: Case Study Report – Housing Partnerships and Consortia in Northern Ireland, Birmingham: Third Sector Research Centre. Mullins, D. Czischke, D. and van Bortel, G. (2012) Exploring the meaning of hybridity and social enterprise in housing organisations. Housing Studies 27, 4: 405-417. Mullins, D. and Pawson, H. (2010) ‘Housing associations: agents of policy or profits in disguise?’ in Billis, D. (ed.) Hybrid Organisations and the Third Sector: Challenges or Practice, Theory and Policy, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Mullins, D., Rhodes, M.L. & Williamson, A. (2001) ‘Organisational Fields and Third Sector Housing in Ireland, North and South’, Voluntas Vol. 12 no. 3:.257-278. NCVO, (2012) The UK Civil Society Almanac, London: National Council for Voluntary Organisations. NIAO (2010) Creating Effective Partnerships between Government and the Voluntary and Community Sector. Belfast: Northern Ireland Audit Office. NICVA (2012) State of the Sector VI, Belfast: Northern Ireland Council for Voluntary Action. NIE (2012) Programme for Government 2011-15, Belfast: Northern Ireland Executive. NIHE (2005) Northern Ireland Supporting People strategy 2005-10. Belfast: Northern Ireland Housing Executive. NIHE (2012) Homelessness Strategy for Northern Ireland 2012-17, Belfast: Northern Ireland Housing Executive. Nolan, P. (2012) Northern Ireland Peace Monitoring Report, Number one, Belfast: Community Relations Council. 33 North Harbour Consulting (2012) Strategic Review of Supported Accommodation Schemes for Homeless People in Northern Ireland funded by the Supporting People Programme. Belfast: Northern Ireland Housing Executive. PAC NI 2012 Report on Creating Effective Partnerships between Government and the Voluntary and Community Sector, Belfast: Northern Ireland Assembly. Parr, S. (2010) The Role of Social Housing in the ‘Care and Control’ of Tenants with Mental Health Problems, Social Policy and Society, 9 (1) 111-122. Rees, J., Mullins, D. and Bovaird, T. (2012a) Third Sector Partnerships for Service Delivery: an evidence review. TSRC Working Paper 60. University of Birmingham. Rees, J. Mullins, D. Bovaird, T. ( 2012b) Third Sector Partnerships for Service Delivery: Principles, Models and Trends: Exploration of Organisational and Sector Case Studies TSRC Final Project Report. University of Birmingham. Sacranie, H. (2012) Hybridity Enacted in a Large English Housing Association: A Tale of Strategy, Culture and Community Investment. . Housing Studies 27, 4: 533-552. Smith, S. R. (2010) Hybridization and nonprofit organisations: The governance challenge. Policy and Society 29 (2010) 219–229. Teasdale, S. (2012) Negotiating tensions: How do Social Enterprises in the Homelessness Field Balance Social and Commercial Considerations? . Housing Studies 27, 4: 514-532. Zimmeck, M. (2010) The Compact 10 years on: government's approach to partnership with the voluntary and community sector in England. Voluntary Sector Review, Volume 1, Number 1, March 2010: 125-133(9).

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    N2 - Hybridisation is sometimes considered as a purposeful adaptive response by organisations to a turbulent environment, for example by charities moving to more market or trading based methods of income generation (Smith 2010). The importance of external drivers arising from change in the public policy and funding environment is also increasingly recognised (Harris 2010). What is less well researched are the messy processes whereby organisational adaptation occurs in an incremental way and in specific political contexts, influenced simultaneously by competing public, market and community logics that drive hybridisation at sector and organisational levels.This paper draws on recent work with third sector housing and support organisations in Northern Ireland undertaken in the new political context associated with the restoration of accountability to the NI Assembly. It investigates the competing influences of i) moves towards greater democratic accountability to the devolved Northern Ireland Assembly ii) policies to promote voluntary and community sector involvement in public service delivery (the NI Concordat) and iii) grant –based commissioning of housing support and welfare services in the fields of mental health and homelessness. It explores how these competing influences affect organisational adaptation strategies. The role of agency and how this is articulated through incremental adaptation decisions for long term sector hybridisation are explored through case studies of the enactment of policies on Supporting People in the fields of mental health and homelessness.

    AB - Hybridisation is sometimes considered as a purposeful adaptive response by organisations to a turbulent environment, for example by charities moving to more market or trading based methods of income generation (Smith 2010). The importance of external drivers arising from change in the public policy and funding environment is also increasingly recognised (Harris 2010). What is less well researched are the messy processes whereby organisational adaptation occurs in an incremental way and in specific political contexts, influenced simultaneously by competing public, market and community logics that drive hybridisation at sector and organisational levels.This paper draws on recent work with third sector housing and support organisations in Northern Ireland undertaken in the new political context associated with the restoration of accountability to the NI Assembly. It investigates the competing influences of i) moves towards greater democratic accountability to the devolved Northern Ireland Assembly ii) policies to promote voluntary and community sector involvement in public service delivery (the NI Concordat) and iii) grant –based commissioning of housing support and welfare services in the fields of mental health and homelessness. It explores how these competing influences affect organisational adaptation strategies. The role of agency and how this is articulated through incremental adaptation decisions for long term sector hybridisation are explored through case studies of the enactment of policies on Supporting People in the fields of mental health and homelessness.

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    Acheson N, Mullins D. Competing Drivers of Hybridity: Third Sector Housing Organisations in Northern Ireland. In Unknown Host Publication. 2012. p. 1-34