Collective Worship and Religious Observance in Schools: Collective Worship in Northern Ireland's Schools

Aideen Hunter, Norman Richardson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Abstract

Northern Ireland is a unique country within the United Kingdom, having a complex and highly contested cultural and civic identity. Religion plays a specific defining role within this context. While it has been argued that the Northern Ireland conflict was not religious (Barnes, 2005), religion as a social identity marker, nevertheless plays a defining role in where people live, work, socialise and are educated. Religious Education and collective worship in schools have become the elephant in the room, under-researched and under-addressed in the post-conflict narrative. Religious Education has not been a major focus of community relations work or in shared education initiatives. Both historically and contemporarily in many schools there has been little distinction between religious instruction/education and participation in prayers and liturgical practices. Current legislative orders are inherited directives from the 1947 Education Act and the 1986 Education Reform order, which stipulate daily Christian collective worship which is not particular to any religious denomination. Collective worship is largely influenced by the ethos of a school and who is delivering it; there is no inspection or guidance on this process. This lack of direction results in considerable diversity across the sectors in the overall standards and quality of school collective worship.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationReligion, Education and Values
EditorsPeter Crumper, Alison Mawhinney
Place of PublicationGermany
Chapter2
Pages43-58
Number of pages16
Volume13
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-78707-657-0
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jan 2018

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religious education
school
education
religious instruction
Religion
denomination
Ireland
act
narrative
reform
participation
lack
community

Keywords

  • Religion
  • Schools
  • Human Rights

Cite this

Hunter, A., & Richardson, N. (2018). Collective Worship and Religious Observance in Schools: Collective Worship in Northern Ireland's Schools. In P. Crumper, & A. Mawhinney (Eds.), Religion, Education and Values (Vol. 13, pp. 43-58). Germany.
Hunter, Aideen ; Richardson, Norman. / Collective Worship and Religious Observance in Schools : Collective Worship in Northern Ireland's Schools. Religion, Education and Values. editor / Peter Crumper ; Alison Mawhinney. Vol. 13 Germany, 2018. pp. 43-58
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Hunter, A & Richardson, N 2018, Collective Worship and Religious Observance in Schools: Collective Worship in Northern Ireland's Schools. in P Crumper & A Mawhinney (eds), Religion, Education and Values. vol. 13, Germany, pp. 43-58.

Collective Worship and Religious Observance in Schools : Collective Worship in Northern Ireland's Schools. / Hunter, Aideen; Richardson, Norman.

Religion, Education and Values. ed. / Peter Crumper; Alison Mawhinney. Vol. 13 Germany, 2018. p. 43-58.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

TY - CHAP

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AU - Hunter, Aideen

AU - Richardson, Norman

PY - 2018/1/31

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N2 - AbstractNorthern Ireland is a unique country within the United Kingdom, having a complex and highly contested cultural and civic identity. Religion plays a specific defining role within this context. While it has been argued that the Northern Ireland conflict was not religious (Barnes, 2005), religion as a social identity marker, nevertheless plays a defining role in where people live, work, socialise and are educated. Religious Education and collective worship in schools have become the elephant in the room, under-researched and under-addressed in the post-conflict narrative. Religious Education has not been a major focus of community relations work or in shared education initiatives. Both historically and contemporarily in many schools there has been little distinction between religious instruction/education and participation in prayers and liturgical practices. Current legislative orders are inherited directives from the 1947 Education Act and the 1986 Education Reform order, which stipulate daily Christian collective worship which is not particular to any religious denomination. Collective worship is largely influenced by the ethos of a school and who is delivering it; there is no inspection or guidance on this process. This lack of direction results in considerable diversity across the sectors in the overall standards and quality of school collective worship.

AB - AbstractNorthern Ireland is a unique country within the United Kingdom, having a complex and highly contested cultural and civic identity. Religion plays a specific defining role within this context. While it has been argued that the Northern Ireland conflict was not religious (Barnes, 2005), religion as a social identity marker, nevertheless plays a defining role in where people live, work, socialise and are educated. Religious Education and collective worship in schools have become the elephant in the room, under-researched and under-addressed in the post-conflict narrative. Religious Education has not been a major focus of community relations work or in shared education initiatives. Both historically and contemporarily in many schools there has been little distinction between religious instruction/education and participation in prayers and liturgical practices. Current legislative orders are inherited directives from the 1947 Education Act and the 1986 Education Reform order, which stipulate daily Christian collective worship which is not particular to any religious denomination. Collective worship is largely influenced by the ethos of a school and who is delivering it; there is no inspection or guidance on this process. This lack of direction results in considerable diversity across the sectors in the overall standards and quality of school collective worship.

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Hunter A, Richardson N. Collective Worship and Religious Observance in Schools: Collective Worship in Northern Ireland's Schools. In Crumper P, Mawhinney A, editors, Religion, Education and Values. Vol. 13. Germany. 2018. p. 43-58