Changing Responses during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Comparison of Psychological Wellbeing and Work-Related Quality of Life of UK Health and Social Care Workers

Ruth D. Neill, Paula McFadden, Jill Manthorpe, J. Mallett, Denise Currie, Heike Schroder, Jermaine Ravalier, Patricia Nicholl, John Moriarty, Susan McGrory, Rachel Naylor, Hannah Davies, Justin Maclochlainn

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Abstract

Aim: to explore the psychological wellbeing and work-related quality of life amongst United Kingdom (UK) health and social care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Subject and methods: Health and social care professionals within nursing, midwifery, allied health professions, social care and social work occupations working in the UK during the pandemic were recruited. Repeated cross-sectional online surveys were conducted during six time periods of the pandemic (May–July 2020, November–February 2021, May–July 2021, November 2021–February 2022, May–July 2022 and November 2022–February 2023). Results: Over 14,000 participants completed the surveys during the data collection periods. The findings revealed that over the pandemic, psychological wellbeing and work-related quality of life scores significantly decreased. Conclusions: The overall psychological wellbeing and work-related quality of life of health and social care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic significantly declined. Further research is warranted on the lasting impact of the pandemic on this workforce. The health and social care workforce needs support to prevent further deterioration and to rebuild its wellbeing and resilience.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)369-386
Number of pages18
JournalBiomed
Volume3
Issue number3
Early online date26 Jul 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished online - 26 Jul 2023

Keywords

  • health care workforce;
  • social care workforce;
  • United Kingdom;
  • pandemic;
  • COVID-19;
  • coping
  • wellbeing
  • quality of working life

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