CHANGING-LOUDNESS AFTEREFFECT FOLLOWING SIMULATED MOVEMENT - IMPLICATIONS FOR CHANNEL HYPOTHESES CONCERNING SOUND LEVEL CHANGE AND MOVEMENT

Anthony Reinhardt-Rutland

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Listening to a tone changing unidirectionally in sound level causes an illusion of changing loudness in a steady tone afterward. This aftereffect may indicate channels for detecting the feature of change in sound level, which would primarily concern dynamic sound localization. Three subjects, one of whom was the author, participated in this study. The author predicted that opposite adaptation of the ears (the adapting stimulus is heard to move from one ear to the other) should lead to a movement aftereffect. This was not reported by the subjects. However, the subjects did report a changing-loudness aftereffect in a monaural test stimulus, and the characteristics of the changing-loudness aftereffect (such as its magnitude) were consistent with previous data, suggesting a two-stage channel hypothesis: Output from channels for several features, including sound-level change, simultaneously stimulate movement channels.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)113-121
    JournalJournal of General Psychology
    Volume119
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 1992

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