Celebrating Community Involvement: Leading Lights, Moving Spirits and Lattice-work Networks

Deborah Peel, N Bailey

    Research output: Book/ReportBook

    Abstract

    Community involvement in regeneration is increasingly promoted as a ‘good thing’ and there are many publications offering guidance on how to involve local people in the delivery of sustainable regeneration. The advice generally points out the importance of valuing individuals’ involvement whose ideas, energies and time are often invested benevolently. This publication is an attempt to begin to recognise and articulate that value. Through anumber of models of involvement, the study brings together a variety of examples of personal discovery, sense of accomplishment and deep social learning that participating in the management of community projects can bring. Thus, this study details the stories of 21 people involved in different ways with their local community development trust as a way to celebrate individuals’ contributions to the quality of individual and community life in localneighbourhoods. It begins to tease out what inspires and motivates local people to become actively involved and what practices are used by trusts to encourage, sustain and expand membership and participation in the management of trusts and projects. The richness of the individual stories and depth of insight of the interviewees’ experience andlearning is reflected in the style of this report which draws heavily on participants’ own words, in an attempt to capture the human dynamics at play. The report highlights the very personal nature of individual learning and motivation and avoids the use of what some participants described as regeneration jargon and ‘regenerese’. In the main, the report does not seek to universalise some kind of elusive community member experience, but instead respects each individual and their sense of personhood. Thus, this study weaves a collection of tales together using common sense language.
    LanguageEnglish
    Number of pages53
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

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    community
    social learning
    community development
    management
    experience
    energy
    participation
    language
    learning
    Values
    time

    Cite this

    @book{a69e3897e36e4c27b3e0d23ffcd799b8,
    title = "Celebrating Community Involvement: Leading Lights, Moving Spirits and Lattice-work Networks",
    abstract = "Community involvement in regeneration is increasingly promoted as a ‘good thing’ and there are many publications offering guidance on how to involve local people in the delivery of sustainable regeneration. The advice generally points out the importance of valuing individuals’ involvement whose ideas, energies and time are often invested benevolently. This publication is an attempt to begin to recognise and articulate that value. Through anumber of models of involvement, the study brings together a variety of examples of personal discovery, sense of accomplishment and deep social learning that participating in the management of community projects can bring. Thus, this study details the stories of 21 people involved in different ways with their local community development trust as a way to celebrate individuals’ contributions to the quality of individual and community life in localneighbourhoods. It begins to tease out what inspires and motivates local people to become actively involved and what practices are used by trusts to encourage, sustain and expand membership and participation in the management of trusts and projects. The richness of the individual stories and depth of insight of the interviewees’ experience andlearning is reflected in the style of this report which draws heavily on participants’ own words, in an attempt to capture the human dynamics at play. The report highlights the very personal nature of individual learning and motivation and avoids the use of what some participants described as regeneration jargon and ‘regenerese’. In the main, the report does not seek to universalise some kind of elusive community member experience, but instead respects each individual and their sense of personhood. Thus, this study weaves a collection of tales together using common sense language.",
    author = "Deborah Peel and N Bailey",
    note = "Reference text: Commission on Social Justice (The Report of the) (1994) Social Justice: Strategies for National Renewal London: Vintage DfEE (1998) The Learning Age: A Renaissance for a New Britain. http://www.lifelonglearning.co.uk/greenpaper/index.htm DTA (2001) Developing an asset-base London: Development Trusts Association DTA (2002) Fabulous Beasts: Stories of Community Enterprise from the DTA London: Development Trusts Association DTI (2002) Social Enterprise: A Strategy for Success London: DTI Gibson, T (1996) The Power in Our Hands: Neighbourhood Based - World Shaking Chipping Norton: Jon Carpenter Putnam, R (1993) Making Democracy Work: Civic Traditions in Modern Italy Princeton: New Jersey: Princeton University Press SEU (Social Exclusion Unit) (2000) National Strategy for Neighbourhood Renewal Report of Policy Action Team 16: Learning Lessons London: SEU Thake, S (1995) Staying the course: The role and structure of community regeneration organisations London: Development Trusts Association Ward, M and Watson, S (1997) Here to stay: A public policy framework for community-based regeneration, London: Development Trusts Association",
    year = "2003",
    language = "English",
    isbn = "0-9531469-5-2",

    }

    Celebrating Community Involvement: Leading Lights, Moving Spirits and Lattice-work Networks. / Peel, Deborah; Bailey, N.

    2003. 53 p.

    Research output: Book/ReportBook

    TY - BOOK

    T1 - Celebrating Community Involvement: Leading Lights, Moving Spirits and Lattice-work Networks

    AU - Peel, Deborah

    AU - Bailey, N

    N1 - Reference text: Commission on Social Justice (The Report of the) (1994) Social Justice: Strategies for National Renewal London: Vintage DfEE (1998) The Learning Age: A Renaissance for a New Britain. http://www.lifelonglearning.co.uk/greenpaper/index.htm DTA (2001) Developing an asset-base London: Development Trusts Association DTA (2002) Fabulous Beasts: Stories of Community Enterprise from the DTA London: Development Trusts Association DTI (2002) Social Enterprise: A Strategy for Success London: DTI Gibson, T (1996) The Power in Our Hands: Neighbourhood Based - World Shaking Chipping Norton: Jon Carpenter Putnam, R (1993) Making Democracy Work: Civic Traditions in Modern Italy Princeton: New Jersey: Princeton University Press SEU (Social Exclusion Unit) (2000) National Strategy for Neighbourhood Renewal Report of Policy Action Team 16: Learning Lessons London: SEU Thake, S (1995) Staying the course: The role and structure of community regeneration organisations London: Development Trusts Association Ward, M and Watson, S (1997) Here to stay: A public policy framework for community-based regeneration, London: Development Trusts Association

    PY - 2003

    Y1 - 2003

    N2 - Community involvement in regeneration is increasingly promoted as a ‘good thing’ and there are many publications offering guidance on how to involve local people in the delivery of sustainable regeneration. The advice generally points out the importance of valuing individuals’ involvement whose ideas, energies and time are often invested benevolently. This publication is an attempt to begin to recognise and articulate that value. Through anumber of models of involvement, the study brings together a variety of examples of personal discovery, sense of accomplishment and deep social learning that participating in the management of community projects can bring. Thus, this study details the stories of 21 people involved in different ways with their local community development trust as a way to celebrate individuals’ contributions to the quality of individual and community life in localneighbourhoods. It begins to tease out what inspires and motivates local people to become actively involved and what practices are used by trusts to encourage, sustain and expand membership and participation in the management of trusts and projects. The richness of the individual stories and depth of insight of the interviewees’ experience andlearning is reflected in the style of this report which draws heavily on participants’ own words, in an attempt to capture the human dynamics at play. The report highlights the very personal nature of individual learning and motivation and avoids the use of what some participants described as regeneration jargon and ‘regenerese’. In the main, the report does not seek to universalise some kind of elusive community member experience, but instead respects each individual and their sense of personhood. Thus, this study weaves a collection of tales together using common sense language.

    AB - Community involvement in regeneration is increasingly promoted as a ‘good thing’ and there are many publications offering guidance on how to involve local people in the delivery of sustainable regeneration. The advice generally points out the importance of valuing individuals’ involvement whose ideas, energies and time are often invested benevolently. This publication is an attempt to begin to recognise and articulate that value. Through anumber of models of involvement, the study brings together a variety of examples of personal discovery, sense of accomplishment and deep social learning that participating in the management of community projects can bring. Thus, this study details the stories of 21 people involved in different ways with their local community development trust as a way to celebrate individuals’ contributions to the quality of individual and community life in localneighbourhoods. It begins to tease out what inspires and motivates local people to become actively involved and what practices are used by trusts to encourage, sustain and expand membership and participation in the management of trusts and projects. The richness of the individual stories and depth of insight of the interviewees’ experience andlearning is reflected in the style of this report which draws heavily on participants’ own words, in an attempt to capture the human dynamics at play. The report highlights the very personal nature of individual learning and motivation and avoids the use of what some participants described as regeneration jargon and ‘regenerese’. In the main, the report does not seek to universalise some kind of elusive community member experience, but instead respects each individual and their sense of personhood. Thus, this study weaves a collection of tales together using common sense language.

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    SN - 0-9531469-5-2

    BT - Celebrating Community Involvement: Leading Lights, Moving Spirits and Lattice-work Networks

    ER -