‘Building bridges on-line: issues of pedagogy and learning outcomes in intercultural education through citizenship’

Roger Austin, John Anderson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This article seeks to address three points. First, we explain the significant increase in school use of collaborative software resulting from four key drivers: the speed at which social software has been embraced by young people outside school and its adoption by educators in more formal school settings; the push to develop “knowledge construction skills” that are relevant to a knowledge-based economy; exposure of more pupils to access a wider curriculum; and, the promotion of intercultural education through citizenship. It is the fourth issue (i.e., the promotion of intercultural education through citizenship) that serves as the focus of this article and its examination in a critical way of the evidence that young people, communicating online, may achieve worthwhile learning outcomes and on what it takes for teachers to develop effective learning experiences. Second, the paper considers the research that sustains the importance of basing inter-school work on theoretical models of learning and contact; the most frequently used learning models derive from the application of “communities of practice” and “knowledge-building networks.” In the case of intercultural education through citizenship, use has been made in some projects of the “contact hypothesis” to identify the conditions under which contact between groups might have the best chance of success. This paper offers a critique of evidence from Hartley (2007), Ligorio (2005), Ligorio and Van Keen (2006) Grant (2006) Shonfeld (2006) and Austin (2006) and concludes that successful work derives from a new paradigm which draws on theoretical models in both education and social psychology. Third, and finally, the paper discusses the implications of collaborative software and the theoretical models of learning presented in terms of pedagogy and learning outcomes and offers comments on the potentially disruptive impact of this approach on learning.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages86-94
    JournalInternational Journal of Information Communication and Technology Education (IJICTE),
    VolumeIssue
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2008

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    intercultural education
    citizenship
    learning
    contact
    school
    promotion
    social psychology
    social media
    evidence
    grant
    pupil
    driver
    educator
    paradigm
    curriculum
    examination
    economy
    teacher
    knowledge
    community

    Cite this

    @article{c374efc888db4228b908a7dc0939691b,
    title = "‘Building bridges on-line: issues of pedagogy and learning outcomes in intercultural education through citizenship’",
    abstract = "This article seeks to address three points. First, we explain the significant increase in school use of collaborative software resulting from four key drivers: the speed at which social software has been embraced by young people outside school and its adoption by educators in more formal school settings; the push to develop “knowledge construction skills” that are relevant to a knowledge-based economy; exposure of more pupils to access a wider curriculum; and, the promotion of intercultural education through citizenship. It is the fourth issue (i.e., the promotion of intercultural education through citizenship) that serves as the focus of this article and its examination in a critical way of the evidence that young people, communicating online, may achieve worthwhile learning outcomes and on what it takes for teachers to develop effective learning experiences. Second, the paper considers the research that sustains the importance of basing inter-school work on theoretical models of learning and contact; the most frequently used learning models derive from the application of “communities of practice” and “knowledge-building networks.” In the case of intercultural education through citizenship, use has been made in some projects of the “contact hypothesis” to identify the conditions under which contact between groups might have the best chance of success. This paper offers a critique of evidence from Hartley (2007), Ligorio (2005), Ligorio and Van Keen (2006) Grant (2006) Shonfeld (2006) and Austin (2006) and concludes that successful work derives from a new paradigm which draws on theoretical models in both education and social psychology. Third, and finally, the paper discusses the implications of collaborative software and the theoretical models of learning presented in terms of pedagogy and learning outcomes and offers comments on the potentially disruptive impact of this approach on learning.",
    author = "Roger Austin and John Anderson",
    note = "Reference text: Abbott.L, Austin.R, Mulkeen.A and Metcalf,N, The Global Classroom: advancing cultural awareness through collaborative work using ICT, European Journal of Special Needs Education, Vol.19, No.2, June 2004. Abbott.L, Austin.R, Mulkeen.A and Metcalf,N, The Global Classroom: advancing cultural awareness through collaborative work using ICT, European Journal of Special Needs Education, Vol.19, No.2, June 2004. Anderson J and McCormick R Pedagogic Quality – supporting the next UK generation of e-learning, Section 26 in Ehlers U-D and Pawlowski JM (eds) Handbook on Quality and the Standardisation in E-Learning. Springer, Berlin 2006 Anderson J and McCormick R Pedagogic Quality in Policy and Innovation in Education. Quality Criteria. EUN Schoolnet. Brussels. 2005 Austin.R, and Anderson,J (2007), E-schooling;global messages from a small island, Routledge, Oxford. Austin.R, Abbot,L, Mulkeen,A and Metcalfe,N, (2003) Dissolving boundaries: cross-national co-operation through technology in education”, The Curriculum Journal, Vol.14 No.1, 55-84 Austin.R, “Reconnecting young people in Northern Ireland; a critique of ICT and citizenship”, in Making Digital Citizens, ed. Loader,B. Routledge, 2007 Austin.R, (2006) “The Role of ICT in bridge-building and social inclusion; theory, policy and practice issues”, European Journal of Teacher Education, Vol.29, No.2, May 2006, pp 145-161 Cochran.D, Conklin.J and Modin.S, “A New Bloom; Transforming learning”, Learning and Leading with Technology, vol34, issue 5, pp22-25 Costello Report (para 5.14) 3 {"}Future Post-Primary Arrangements in Northern Ireland{"}, the Costello Report http://www.deni.gov.uk/pprb/costello_report.htm See also the DE pages about the Costello report http://www.deni.gov.uk/pprb/index.htm Davis,N. Cho,M.O. and Hagenson,.L. “Intercultural competence and the Role of Technology in Teacher Education”, in Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, Vol.4, Issue 4, 2005. http://www.citejournal.org/vol4/iss4/maintoc.cfm (Accessed 7 May 2006) Diversity and Citizenship Curriculum Review (2007) Department for Education and Science, London. Accessed at http://publications.teachernet.gov.uk/default.aspx?PageFunction=productdetails&PageMode=publications&ProductId=DFES-00045-2007 Fabos.B and Young.M.D, (1999) Telecommunication in the Classroom; rhetoric versus reality. Review of Educational Research, 68.3,322-349 Grant,L (2006) “Using Wikis in Schools: a Case Study”, futurelab. Available at www.futurelab.org.uk Hartley.J, “Teaching, learning and the new technology: a review for teachers”, British Journal of educational Technology, Vol.38,No.1 2007, 42-62 Ho,C.M.L, (2000) Developing intercultural awareness and writing skills through email exchange. The Internet TSL Journal,VI, 12 (December). Retrieved September 29, 2005, from http://iteslj.org/Articles/Ho-Email.html Ligorio,B and Veermans,M, (2005),”Perspectives and patterns in developing and implementing international web-based collaborative learning environments”, Computers and Education, Vol.45, Issue 3, 271-275 Ligorio,M.B., and Van Keen,K.( 2006). Constructing a successful cross-national Virtual Learning Environment in Primary and Secondary Education”, Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education Journal, 14(2) 103-128 Ligorio,B, Talamo.A and Pontecorvo,C, (2005) “Building intersubjectivity at a distance during the collaborative writing of fairytales,”, Computers and Education, Vol.45, Issue 3, 357-374 Reading.V, “Knowledge is Power”, European Commissioner for Education and Culture. Extracts from the Public Service Review, European Union, Autumn 2002 Shirky,C (2003). A Group is its own Worst Enemy: paper given at Etech, April 2003. Available from www.shirky.com/writings/group enemy.html (check this) .",
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    T1 - ‘Building bridges on-line: issues of pedagogy and learning outcomes in intercultural education through citizenship’

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    AU - Anderson, John

    N1 - Reference text: Abbott.L, Austin.R, Mulkeen.A and Metcalf,N, The Global Classroom: advancing cultural awareness through collaborative work using ICT, European Journal of Special Needs Education, Vol.19, No.2, June 2004. Abbott.L, Austin.R, Mulkeen.A and Metcalf,N, The Global Classroom: advancing cultural awareness through collaborative work using ICT, European Journal of Special Needs Education, Vol.19, No.2, June 2004. Anderson J and McCormick R Pedagogic Quality – supporting the next UK generation of e-learning, Section 26 in Ehlers U-D and Pawlowski JM (eds) Handbook on Quality and the Standardisation in E-Learning. Springer, Berlin 2006 Anderson J and McCormick R Pedagogic Quality in Policy and Innovation in Education. Quality Criteria. EUN Schoolnet. Brussels. 2005 Austin.R, and Anderson,J (2007), E-schooling;global messages from a small island, Routledge, Oxford. Austin.R, Abbot,L, Mulkeen,A and Metcalfe,N, (2003) Dissolving boundaries: cross-national co-operation through technology in education”, The Curriculum Journal, Vol.14 No.1, 55-84 Austin.R, “Reconnecting young people in Northern Ireland; a critique of ICT and citizenship”, in Making Digital Citizens, ed. Loader,B. Routledge, 2007 Austin.R, (2006) “The Role of ICT in bridge-building and social inclusion; theory, policy and practice issues”, European Journal of Teacher Education, Vol.29, No.2, May 2006, pp 145-161 Cochran.D, Conklin.J and Modin.S, “A New Bloom; Transforming learning”, Learning and Leading with Technology, vol34, issue 5, pp22-25 Costello Report (para 5.14) 3 "Future Post-Primary Arrangements in Northern Ireland", the Costello Report http://www.deni.gov.uk/pprb/costello_report.htm See also the DE pages about the Costello report http://www.deni.gov.uk/pprb/index.htm Davis,N. Cho,M.O. and Hagenson,.L. “Intercultural competence and the Role of Technology in Teacher Education”, in Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, Vol.4, Issue 4, 2005. http://www.citejournal.org/vol4/iss4/maintoc.cfm (Accessed 7 May 2006) Diversity and Citizenship Curriculum Review (2007) Department for Education and Science, London. Accessed at http://publications.teachernet.gov.uk/default.aspx?PageFunction=productdetails&PageMode=publications&ProductId=DFES-00045-2007 Fabos.B and Young.M.D, (1999) Telecommunication in the Classroom; rhetoric versus reality. Review of Educational Research, 68.3,322-349 Grant,L (2006) “Using Wikis in Schools: a Case Study”, futurelab. Available at www.futurelab.org.uk Hartley.J, “Teaching, learning and the new technology: a review for teachers”, British Journal of educational Technology, Vol.38,No.1 2007, 42-62 Ho,C.M.L, (2000) Developing intercultural awareness and writing skills through email exchange. The Internet TSL Journal,VI, 12 (December). Retrieved September 29, 2005, from http://iteslj.org/Articles/Ho-Email.html Ligorio,B and Veermans,M, (2005),”Perspectives and patterns in developing and implementing international web-based collaborative learning environments”, Computers and Education, Vol.45, Issue 3, 271-275 Ligorio,M.B., and Van Keen,K.( 2006). Constructing a successful cross-national Virtual Learning Environment in Primary and Secondary Education”, Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education Journal, 14(2) 103-128 Ligorio,B, Talamo.A and Pontecorvo,C, (2005) “Building intersubjectivity at a distance during the collaborative writing of fairytales,”, Computers and Education, Vol.45, Issue 3, 357-374 Reading.V, “Knowledge is Power”, European Commissioner for Education and Culture. Extracts from the Public Service Review, European Union, Autumn 2002 Shirky,C (2003). A Group is its own Worst Enemy: paper given at Etech, April 2003. Available from www.shirky.com/writings/group enemy.html (check this) .

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    N2 - This article seeks to address three points. First, we explain the significant increase in school use of collaborative software resulting from four key drivers: the speed at which social software has been embraced by young people outside school and its adoption by educators in more formal school settings; the push to develop “knowledge construction skills” that are relevant to a knowledge-based economy; exposure of more pupils to access a wider curriculum; and, the promotion of intercultural education through citizenship. It is the fourth issue (i.e., the promotion of intercultural education through citizenship) that serves as the focus of this article and its examination in a critical way of the evidence that young people, communicating online, may achieve worthwhile learning outcomes and on what it takes for teachers to develop effective learning experiences. Second, the paper considers the research that sustains the importance of basing inter-school work on theoretical models of learning and contact; the most frequently used learning models derive from the application of “communities of practice” and “knowledge-building networks.” In the case of intercultural education through citizenship, use has been made in some projects of the “contact hypothesis” to identify the conditions under which contact between groups might have the best chance of success. This paper offers a critique of evidence from Hartley (2007), Ligorio (2005), Ligorio and Van Keen (2006) Grant (2006) Shonfeld (2006) and Austin (2006) and concludes that successful work derives from a new paradigm which draws on theoretical models in both education and social psychology. Third, and finally, the paper discusses the implications of collaborative software and the theoretical models of learning presented in terms of pedagogy and learning outcomes and offers comments on the potentially disruptive impact of this approach on learning.

    AB - This article seeks to address three points. First, we explain the significant increase in school use of collaborative software resulting from four key drivers: the speed at which social software has been embraced by young people outside school and its adoption by educators in more formal school settings; the push to develop “knowledge construction skills” that are relevant to a knowledge-based economy; exposure of more pupils to access a wider curriculum; and, the promotion of intercultural education through citizenship. It is the fourth issue (i.e., the promotion of intercultural education through citizenship) that serves as the focus of this article and its examination in a critical way of the evidence that young people, communicating online, may achieve worthwhile learning outcomes and on what it takes for teachers to develop effective learning experiences. Second, the paper considers the research that sustains the importance of basing inter-school work on theoretical models of learning and contact; the most frequently used learning models derive from the application of “communities of practice” and “knowledge-building networks.” In the case of intercultural education through citizenship, use has been made in some projects of the “contact hypothesis” to identify the conditions under which contact between groups might have the best chance of success. This paper offers a critique of evidence from Hartley (2007), Ligorio (2005), Ligorio and Van Keen (2006) Grant (2006) Shonfeld (2006) and Austin (2006) and concludes that successful work derives from a new paradigm which draws on theoretical models in both education and social psychology. Third, and finally, the paper discusses the implications of collaborative software and the theoretical models of learning presented in terms of pedagogy and learning outcomes and offers comments on the potentially disruptive impact of this approach on learning.

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