Broadcast Language Identification System (BLIS)

James Connolly, K Curran, P McKevitt, J Macrae, S Craig

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Virtually all TV transmission systems use highly automated file-based broadcast systems for audio and video. Content management systems automatically deliver programmes ready for broadcast by matching content to a schedule and deliver all ancillary services in their correct format and on time. Within these sub-systems is a growing need to validate that the correct language is delivered to a particular service and/or region. In many cases, a single instance of a programme exists and the automated system merely selects the correct language for a particular service. This process is currently managed manually by operators listening to the audio of each programme and confirming that the accompanying language is correct for its video broadcast. Incorrect language transmission can be caused by system faults or errors in the scheduling workflow. An error can occur at numerous points during the broadcast. The Broadcast Language Identification System (BLIS) will provide a single operator with the ability to monitor multiple services by “dash-boarding” language flags from each service and enable the operator to intervene if an error is detected. BLIS will examine streaming audio from a pre-broadcast to identify spoken language within the broadcast content and compare it with the expected language of the video for broadcast.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
EditorsSA Coleman, B Gardiner, D Kerr
Pages189-190
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - 27 Aug 2014
EventProc. of the 16th Irish Machine Vision and Image Processing Conference (IMVIP-14) - University of Ulster, Magee, Derry/Londonderry, Northern Ireland
Duration: 27 Aug 2014 → …

Conference

ConferenceProc. of the 16th Irish Machine Vision and Image Processing Conference (IMVIP-14)
Period27/08/14 → …

Fingerprint

Identification (control systems)
Audio streaming
Scheduling

Cite this

Connolly, J., Curran, K., McKevitt, P., Macrae, J., & Craig, S. (2014). Broadcast Language Identification System (BLIS). In SA. Coleman, B. Gardiner, & D. Kerr (Eds.), Unknown Host Publication (pp. 189-190)
Connolly, James ; Curran, K ; McKevitt, P ; Macrae, J ; Craig, S. / Broadcast Language Identification System (BLIS). Unknown Host Publication. editor / SA Coleman ; B Gardiner ; D Kerr. 2014. pp. 189-190
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Connolly, J, Curran, K, McKevitt, P, Macrae, J & Craig, S 2014, Broadcast Language Identification System (BLIS). in SA Coleman, B Gardiner & D Kerr (eds), Unknown Host Publication. pp. 189-190, Proc. of the 16th Irish Machine Vision and Image Processing Conference (IMVIP-14), 27/08/14.

Broadcast Language Identification System (BLIS). / Connolly, James; Curran, K; McKevitt, P; Macrae, J; Craig, S.

Unknown Host Publication. ed. / SA Coleman; B Gardiner; D Kerr. 2014. p. 189-190.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AU - Curran, K

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AU - Macrae, J

AU - Craig, S

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N2 - Virtually all TV transmission systems use highly automated file-based broadcast systems for audio and video. Content management systems automatically deliver programmes ready for broadcast by matching content to a schedule and deliver all ancillary services in their correct format and on time. Within these sub-systems is a growing need to validate that the correct language is delivered to a particular service and/or region. In many cases, a single instance of a programme exists and the automated system merely selects the correct language for a particular service. This process is currently managed manually by operators listening to the audio of each programme and confirming that the accompanying language is correct for its video broadcast. Incorrect language transmission can be caused by system faults or errors in the scheduling workflow. An error can occur at numerous points during the broadcast. The Broadcast Language Identification System (BLIS) will provide a single operator with the ability to monitor multiple services by “dash-boarding” language flags from each service and enable the operator to intervene if an error is detected. BLIS will examine streaming audio from a pre-broadcast to identify spoken language within the broadcast content and compare it with the expected language of the video for broadcast.

AB - Virtually all TV transmission systems use highly automated file-based broadcast systems for audio and video. Content management systems automatically deliver programmes ready for broadcast by matching content to a schedule and deliver all ancillary services in their correct format and on time. Within these sub-systems is a growing need to validate that the correct language is delivered to a particular service and/or region. In many cases, a single instance of a programme exists and the automated system merely selects the correct language for a particular service. This process is currently managed manually by operators listening to the audio of each programme and confirming that the accompanying language is correct for its video broadcast. Incorrect language transmission can be caused by system faults or errors in the scheduling workflow. An error can occur at numerous points during the broadcast. The Broadcast Language Identification System (BLIS) will provide a single operator with the ability to monitor multiple services by “dash-boarding” language flags from each service and enable the operator to intervene if an error is detected. BLIS will examine streaming audio from a pre-broadcast to identify spoken language within the broadcast content and compare it with the expected language of the video for broadcast.

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Connolly J, Curran K, McKevitt P, Macrae J, Craig S. Broadcast Language Identification System (BLIS). In Coleman SA, Gardiner B, Kerr D, editors, Unknown Host Publication. 2014. p. 189-190