Britain, Nasser and the Outbreak of the Six Day War

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This article explores the role of Britain in the lead-up to the 1967 Middle Eastern War. It analyzes why Britain took such an active role in the initial stages and why this was scaled back to a policy of non-intervention in the end. It concludes that Britain's interests in the Middle East, which were primarily the protection of oil, the maintenance of a balance of power and the containment of Nasser, became dependent on an Israeli military victory. Intervention would have had much too high a political and economic cost. Likewise, the USA came to much the same conclusion, which was why both nations secretly welcomed the Israeli victory.
LanguageEnglish
Pages619-639
JournalJournal of Contemporary History
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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Israeli
non-intervention
balance of power
Middle East
Military
costs
economics
Victory
Containment
Oil
Costs
Economics
Balance of Power

Cite this

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Britain, Nasser and the Outbreak of the Six Day War. / McNamara, Robert.

In: Journal of Contemporary History, Vol. 35, No. 4, 2000, p. 619-639.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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