Boolean Logic and Brexit: Entropic Times

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

Abstract

Boolean Logic and Brexit: Entropic Times in ART POST-BREXIT – AN AICA-IRELAND DISCUSSION

Speakers were to address a list of guiding questions posed by AICA (International Association of Art Critics) for speakers at ART POST-BREXIT – AN AICA-IRELAND DISCUSSION. As I spoke the film ‘Boolean Logic’ charting the construction and collapse of ‘Boolean Logic’ an entropic installation from 2015, played on a continuous loop. The piece, seeking to understand mathematician Boole’s logic gates was commissioned to for Boolean Expressions, Contemporary Art and Mathematical Data, an exhibition celebrating his bi-centenary in the Lewis Glucksman Gallery UCC, Cork Curated by Fiona Kearney. Showing the pieces’ continuous collapse whilst under construction was an attempt to consider entropy as a political metaphor and Brexit as a tipping point.


Thursday 1 November 2018 (1.45pm – 4.15 pm)
Banqueting Hall, Belfast City Hall
AICA Ireland is hosting a discussion on Brexit and its implications for visual artists, curators, critics and publics. While media coverage has focussed on the economic and political uncertainty that the referendum has caused, the wider cultural and philosophical contexts have scarcely been addressed. Jean Monnet, one of the founding fathers of what is now the EU, is supposed to have said, ‘If I had to do it again, I would begin with culture’.
The practical implications for the post-Brexit cultural sector in Ireland, Britain and the rest of Europe is potentially enormous. Artists and academics will be severely affected. While taking account of this, this discussion seeks to look beyond the pecuniary. What does being part of the EU mean to its citizens in cultural terms and in terms of their identity in the contemporary world? What does leaving the EU and becoming a citizen of a ‘great global trading nation’ mean? What role can pan Ireland organisations like AICA Ireland play in this new scenario? For some the EU is a deeply flawed organisation but it remains the most significant and imaginative template for a common European identity, for freedom of movement and peaceful co-existence of its citizens into the future. Brexit throws up significant questions about the resurgence of nationalism, about cultural integration, about missed opportunities for Ireland, North and South, but also potential for change and for new directions including alternative models of exchange. This discussion seeks to probe these questions from a range of historical and philosophical perspectives from writers and artists living in Ireland, the UK and the rest of the EU.
Confirmed speakers:
Pat Cooke, School of Art History and Cultural Policy UCD.
Riann Coulter, FE McWilliam Gallery, Banbridge.
Colin Darke, artist and writer, based in Belfast.
Daniel Jewesbury (By Skype), Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg.
Gavin Murphy, Centre for Creative Arts and Media, GMIT.
Aisling O’Beirn, artist who also works at the Belfast School of Art, UU.
The discussion is chaired by Róisín Kennedy, School of Art History and Cultural Policy UCD.
All welcome.
The event is hosted in partnership with the Belfast Visual Arts Forum (BVAF) and Belfast City Council.
BVAF was established by the city’s visual arts sector and Belfast City Council in 2014 to provide synergy and leadership to facilitate the development of the visual arts sector. It has over 70 members from the visual arts and other relevant stakeholders, such as ACNI, Thrive (formerly Audiences NI) and Voluntary Arts Ireland.

Gavin Murphy and Daniel Jewesbury will develop upon their contributions to an upcoming special issue of Third Text: Lost in Europe: in the wake of Britain’s inner emigration, guest edited by Richard Appignanesi, due to come out later in November.

Fingerprint

Ireland
Logic
Belfast
Art
Artist
Art School
Writer
Art History
Art Forum
Cultural Policy
Template
Entropy
F. E. McWilliam
Synergy
Scenarios
Resurgence
Visual Artists
George Boole
Centenary
Cork

Cite this

O'Beirn, A. (2018). Boolean Logic and Brexit: Entropic Times. ART POST-BREXIT , Belfast, .
@conference{fc87991359c3409da8d31517f892bb42,
title = "Boolean Logic and Brexit: Entropic Times",
abstract = "Boolean Logic and Brexit: Entropic Times in ART POST-BREXIT – AN AICA-IRELAND DISCUSSIONSpeakers were to address a list of guiding questions posed by AICA (International Association of Art Critics) for speakers at ART POST-BREXIT – AN AICA-IRELAND DISCUSSION. As I spoke the film ‘Boolean Logic’ charting the construction and collapse of ‘Boolean Logic’ an entropic installation from 2015, played on a continuous loop. The piece, seeking to understand mathematician Boole’s logic gates was commissioned to for Boolean Expressions, Contemporary Art and Mathematical Data, an exhibition celebrating his bi-centenary in the Lewis Glucksman Gallery UCC, Cork Curated by Fiona Kearney. Showing the pieces’ continuous collapse whilst under construction was an attempt to consider entropy as a political metaphor and Brexit as a tipping point.Thursday 1 November 2018 (1.45pm – 4.15 pm)Banqueting Hall, Belfast City HallAICA Ireland is hosting a discussion on Brexit and its implications for visual artists, curators, critics and publics. While media coverage has focussed on the economic and political uncertainty that the referendum has caused, the wider cultural and philosophical contexts have scarcely been addressed. Jean Monnet, one of the founding fathers of what is now the EU, is supposed to have said, ‘If I had to do it again, I would begin with culture’.The practical implications for the post-Brexit cultural sector in Ireland, Britain and the rest of Europe is potentially enormous. Artists and academics will be severely affected. While taking account of this, this discussion seeks to look beyond the pecuniary. What does being part of the EU mean to its citizens in cultural terms and in terms of their identity in the contemporary world? What does leaving the EU and becoming a citizen of a ‘great global trading nation’ mean? What role can pan Ireland organisations like AICA Ireland play in this new scenario? For some the EU is a deeply flawed organisation but it remains the most significant and imaginative template for a common European identity, for freedom of movement and peaceful co-existence of its citizens into the future. Brexit throws up significant questions about the resurgence of nationalism, about cultural integration, about missed opportunities for Ireland, North and South, but also potential for change and for new directions including alternative models of exchange. This discussion seeks to probe these questions from a range of historical and philosophical perspectives from writers and artists living in Ireland, the UK and the rest of the EU.Confirmed speakers:Pat Cooke, School of Art History and Cultural Policy UCD.Riann Coulter, FE McWilliam Gallery, Banbridge.Colin Darke, artist and writer, based in Belfast.Daniel Jewesbury (By Skype), Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg.Gavin Murphy, Centre for Creative Arts and Media, GMIT.Aisling O’Beirn, artist who also works at the Belfast School of Art, UU.The discussion is chaired by R{\'o}is{\'i}n Kennedy, School of Art History and Cultural Policy UCD.All welcome.The event is hosted in partnership with the Belfast Visual Arts Forum (BVAF) and Belfast City Council.BVAF was established by the city’s visual arts sector and Belfast City Council in 2014 to provide synergy and leadership to facilitate the development of the visual arts sector. It has over 70 members from the visual arts and other relevant stakeholders, such as ACNI, Thrive (formerly Audiences NI) and Voluntary Arts Ireland. Gavin Murphy and Daniel Jewesbury will develop upon their contributions to an upcoming special issue of Third Text: Lost in Europe: in the wake of Britain’s inner emigration, guest edited by Richard Appignanesi, due to come out later in November.",
author = "Aisling O'Beirn",
note = "O’ Beirn’s current sculptural work explores space as a physical structure and political entity by making and animating forms relating to observed and theoretical structures being studied by contemporary astronomers and physicists. Much of my recent research, facilitated by Armagh Observatory, Dunsink Observatory and The Centre for Astronomy NUIG, Galway is an extension of previous work on the relationship between the politics of place uncovering the tensions between disparate forms of official and of unofficial information. This work is interdisciplinary, exploring the relationship between art and science. It manifests variously as sculpture, installation, animation and site-specific projects. Documentation of my previous work can be seen on www.aislingobeirn.com O’ Beirn is based in Belfast and has exhibited nationally and internationally. She was on of the artists chosen for Northern Ireland’s first participation in the 51st Venice Biennale. She is a member of the group Centrifugal consisting of artists architects, theorists and curators from Zagreb Helsinki and Belfast, investigating the notion of peripherallity in a European context. O’ Beirn is also an Associate Lecturer in Sculpture at the University of Ulster ; ART POST-BREXIT : AN AICA-IRELAND DISCUSSION ; Conference date: 01-11-2018 Through 01-11-2018",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "1",
language = "English",
url = "http://www.aicauk.org/2018/10/06/art-post-brexit-an-aica-ireland-discussion/",

}

O'Beirn, A 2018, 'Boolean Logic and Brexit: Entropic Times' ART POST-BREXIT , Belfast, 1/11/18 - 1/11/18, .

Boolean Logic and Brexit : Entropic Times. / O'Beirn, Aisling.

2018. ART POST-BREXIT , Belfast, .

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

TY - CONF

T1 - Boolean Logic and Brexit

T2 - Entropic Times

AU - O'Beirn, Aisling

N1 - O’ Beirn’s current sculptural work explores space as a physical structure and political entity by making and animating forms relating to observed and theoretical structures being studied by contemporary astronomers and physicists. Much of my recent research, facilitated by Armagh Observatory, Dunsink Observatory and The Centre for Astronomy NUIG, Galway is an extension of previous work on the relationship between the politics of place uncovering the tensions between disparate forms of official and of unofficial information. This work is interdisciplinary, exploring the relationship between art and science. It manifests variously as sculpture, installation, animation and site-specific projects. Documentation of my previous work can be seen on www.aislingobeirn.com O’ Beirn is based in Belfast and has exhibited nationally and internationally. She was on of the artists chosen for Northern Ireland’s first participation in the 51st Venice Biennale. She is a member of the group Centrifugal consisting of artists architects, theorists and curators from Zagreb Helsinki and Belfast, investigating the notion of peripherallity in a European context. O’ Beirn is also an Associate Lecturer in Sculpture at the University of Ulster

PY - 2018/11/1

Y1 - 2018/11/1

N2 - Boolean Logic and Brexit: Entropic Times in ART POST-BREXIT – AN AICA-IRELAND DISCUSSIONSpeakers were to address a list of guiding questions posed by AICA (International Association of Art Critics) for speakers at ART POST-BREXIT – AN AICA-IRELAND DISCUSSION. As I spoke the film ‘Boolean Logic’ charting the construction and collapse of ‘Boolean Logic’ an entropic installation from 2015, played on a continuous loop. The piece, seeking to understand mathematician Boole’s logic gates was commissioned to for Boolean Expressions, Contemporary Art and Mathematical Data, an exhibition celebrating his bi-centenary in the Lewis Glucksman Gallery UCC, Cork Curated by Fiona Kearney. Showing the pieces’ continuous collapse whilst under construction was an attempt to consider entropy as a political metaphor and Brexit as a tipping point.Thursday 1 November 2018 (1.45pm – 4.15 pm)Banqueting Hall, Belfast City HallAICA Ireland is hosting a discussion on Brexit and its implications for visual artists, curators, critics and publics. While media coverage has focussed on the economic and political uncertainty that the referendum has caused, the wider cultural and philosophical contexts have scarcely been addressed. Jean Monnet, one of the founding fathers of what is now the EU, is supposed to have said, ‘If I had to do it again, I would begin with culture’.The practical implications for the post-Brexit cultural sector in Ireland, Britain and the rest of Europe is potentially enormous. Artists and academics will be severely affected. While taking account of this, this discussion seeks to look beyond the pecuniary. What does being part of the EU mean to its citizens in cultural terms and in terms of their identity in the contemporary world? What does leaving the EU and becoming a citizen of a ‘great global trading nation’ mean? What role can pan Ireland organisations like AICA Ireland play in this new scenario? For some the EU is a deeply flawed organisation but it remains the most significant and imaginative template for a common European identity, for freedom of movement and peaceful co-existence of its citizens into the future. Brexit throws up significant questions about the resurgence of nationalism, about cultural integration, about missed opportunities for Ireland, North and South, but also potential for change and for new directions including alternative models of exchange. This discussion seeks to probe these questions from a range of historical and philosophical perspectives from writers and artists living in Ireland, the UK and the rest of the EU.Confirmed speakers:Pat Cooke, School of Art History and Cultural Policy UCD.Riann Coulter, FE McWilliam Gallery, Banbridge.Colin Darke, artist and writer, based in Belfast.Daniel Jewesbury (By Skype), Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg.Gavin Murphy, Centre for Creative Arts and Media, GMIT.Aisling O’Beirn, artist who also works at the Belfast School of Art, UU.The discussion is chaired by Róisín Kennedy, School of Art History and Cultural Policy UCD.All welcome.The event is hosted in partnership with the Belfast Visual Arts Forum (BVAF) and Belfast City Council.BVAF was established by the city’s visual arts sector and Belfast City Council in 2014 to provide synergy and leadership to facilitate the development of the visual arts sector. It has over 70 members from the visual arts and other relevant stakeholders, such as ACNI, Thrive (formerly Audiences NI) and Voluntary Arts Ireland. Gavin Murphy and Daniel Jewesbury will develop upon their contributions to an upcoming special issue of Third Text: Lost in Europe: in the wake of Britain’s inner emigration, guest edited by Richard Appignanesi, due to come out later in November.

AB - Boolean Logic and Brexit: Entropic Times in ART POST-BREXIT – AN AICA-IRELAND DISCUSSIONSpeakers were to address a list of guiding questions posed by AICA (International Association of Art Critics) for speakers at ART POST-BREXIT – AN AICA-IRELAND DISCUSSION. As I spoke the film ‘Boolean Logic’ charting the construction and collapse of ‘Boolean Logic’ an entropic installation from 2015, played on a continuous loop. The piece, seeking to understand mathematician Boole’s logic gates was commissioned to for Boolean Expressions, Contemporary Art and Mathematical Data, an exhibition celebrating his bi-centenary in the Lewis Glucksman Gallery UCC, Cork Curated by Fiona Kearney. Showing the pieces’ continuous collapse whilst under construction was an attempt to consider entropy as a political metaphor and Brexit as a tipping point.Thursday 1 November 2018 (1.45pm – 4.15 pm)Banqueting Hall, Belfast City HallAICA Ireland is hosting a discussion on Brexit and its implications for visual artists, curators, critics and publics. While media coverage has focussed on the economic and political uncertainty that the referendum has caused, the wider cultural and philosophical contexts have scarcely been addressed. Jean Monnet, one of the founding fathers of what is now the EU, is supposed to have said, ‘If I had to do it again, I would begin with culture’.The practical implications for the post-Brexit cultural sector in Ireland, Britain and the rest of Europe is potentially enormous. Artists and academics will be severely affected. While taking account of this, this discussion seeks to look beyond the pecuniary. What does being part of the EU mean to its citizens in cultural terms and in terms of their identity in the contemporary world? What does leaving the EU and becoming a citizen of a ‘great global trading nation’ mean? What role can pan Ireland organisations like AICA Ireland play in this new scenario? For some the EU is a deeply flawed organisation but it remains the most significant and imaginative template for a common European identity, for freedom of movement and peaceful co-existence of its citizens into the future. Brexit throws up significant questions about the resurgence of nationalism, about cultural integration, about missed opportunities for Ireland, North and South, but also potential for change and for new directions including alternative models of exchange. This discussion seeks to probe these questions from a range of historical and philosophical perspectives from writers and artists living in Ireland, the UK and the rest of the EU.Confirmed speakers:Pat Cooke, School of Art History and Cultural Policy UCD.Riann Coulter, FE McWilliam Gallery, Banbridge.Colin Darke, artist and writer, based in Belfast.Daniel Jewesbury (By Skype), Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg.Gavin Murphy, Centre for Creative Arts and Media, GMIT.Aisling O’Beirn, artist who also works at the Belfast School of Art, UU.The discussion is chaired by Róisín Kennedy, School of Art History and Cultural Policy UCD.All welcome.The event is hosted in partnership with the Belfast Visual Arts Forum (BVAF) and Belfast City Council.BVAF was established by the city’s visual arts sector and Belfast City Council in 2014 to provide synergy and leadership to facilitate the development of the visual arts sector. It has over 70 members from the visual arts and other relevant stakeholders, such as ACNI, Thrive (formerly Audiences NI) and Voluntary Arts Ireland. Gavin Murphy and Daniel Jewesbury will develop upon their contributions to an upcoming special issue of Third Text: Lost in Europe: in the wake of Britain’s inner emigration, guest edited by Richard Appignanesi, due to come out later in November.

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O'Beirn A. Boolean Logic and Brexit: Entropic Times. 2018. ART POST-BREXIT , Belfast, .