Board composition in federated structures: a case study of the Gaelic Athletic Association

Ian O'Boyle, David Hassan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

ABSTRACTThis paper examines the issue of board composition within non- profit sport organizations operating in a federated governance structure. The Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) is used as a case study to illustrate the challenges and complexities of comprising a board that has the requisite skill set to carry out its function in a rapidly changing operating environment. Interviews (n = 10) supported by document analysis were conducted with senior ranking officials within the Association in order to analyse the integral factors related to board composition within the GAA. Findings show that the Association heavily relies on the delegate system of board composition, potentially limiting its ability to appoint a board that has a commercially orientated focus reflecting the professionalization and commercialization of the contemporary sport industry. Practical and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed along with suggestions for future research.
LanguageEnglish
Pages109-123
JournalWorld Leisure Journal
Volume51
Early online date3 Feb 2016
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 3 Feb 2016

Fingerprint

Sports
document analysis
professionalization
commercialization
ranking
governance
industry
ability
interview

Keywords

  • Governance
  • Sport Management
  • GAA
  • Board

Cite this

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title = "Board composition in federated structures: a case study of the Gaelic Athletic Association",
abstract = "ABSTRACTThis paper examines the issue of board composition within non- profit sport organizations operating in a federated governance structure. The Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) is used as a case study to illustrate the challenges and complexities of comprising a board that has the requisite skill set to carry out its function in a rapidly changing operating environment. Interviews (n = 10) supported by document analysis were conducted with senior ranking officials within the Association in order to analyse the integral factors related to board composition within the GAA. Findings show that the Association heavily relies on the delegate system of board composition, potentially limiting its ability to appoint a board that has a commercially orientated focus reflecting the professionalization and commercialization of the contemporary sport industry. Practical and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed along with suggestions for future research.",
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note = "Accepted 2015 Reference text: Australian Sports Commission. (2005). Governing sport: The role of the board, a good practice guide to sporting organisations. Canberra: Author. Australian Sports Commission. (2012). Governance principles. Canberra: Author. Australian Sports Commission. (2013). Mandatory governance principles. Canberra: Author. Bayle, E., & Robinson, L. (2007). A framework for understanding the performance of national gov- erning bodies of sport. European Sport Management Quarterly, 7, 249–268. Boyce, C., & Neale, P. (2006). Conducting in-depth interviews: A guide for designing and conducting in-depth interviews for evaluation input. Watertown, MA: Pathfinder International. Bradshaw, P., Murray, V., & Wolpin, J. (1992). Do nonprofit boards make a difference? An explora- tion of the relationships among board structure, process, and effectiveness. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 21(3), 227–249. Crawford, D. A., & Carter, C. B. (2011). A good governance structure for Australian cricket. Melbourne: Cricket Australia. Dalton, D. R., Daily, C. M., Johnson, J. L., & Ellstrand, A. E. (1999). Number of directors and finan- cial performance: A meta-analysis. Academy of Management Journal, 42(6), 674–686. Doherty, A., & Carron, A. V. (2003). Cohesion in volunteer sport executive committees. Journal of Sport Management, 17, 116–141. Doherty, A., & Hoye, R. (2011). Role ambiguity and volunteer board member performance in non- profit sport organizations. Nonprofit Management and Leadership, 22(1), 107–128. Edwards, A., & Skinner, J. (2009). Qualitative research in sport management. Oxford: Elsevier. Europa. (2011). Fama, E. F., & Jensen, M. C. (1983). Separation of ownership and control. Journal of Law and Economics, 26, 301–326. Ferkins, L., & Shilbury. (2010). Ferkins, L., & Shilbury, D. (2012). Good boards are strategic: What does that mean for sport gov- ernance? Journal of Sport Management, 26, 67–80. Ferkins, L., Shilbury, D., & McDonald, G. (2005). The role of the board in building strategic capa- bility: Toward an integrated model of sport governance research. Sport Management Review, 8 (3), 195–225. Ferkins, L., Shilbury, D., & McDonald, G. (2009). Hassan, D. (2010). Governance and the Gaelic Athletic Association: Time to move beyond the amateur ideal? Soccer & Society, 11(4), 414–427. Herman, R. D., & Renz, D. O. (2008). Advancing nonprofit organizational effectiveness research and theory. Nonprofit Management & Leadership, 18, 399–415. Hood, J. (1995). The Hood report: A path to superior performance. Christchurch: New Zealand Cricket. Hoye, R. (2004). Leader-member exchanges and board performance of voluntary sport organiz- ations. Non-profit Management & Leadership, 15(1), 55–70. Hoye, R. (2006). Leadership within voluntary sport organization boards. Non-profit Management & Leadership, 16(3), 297–313. Hoye, R., & Auld, C. (2001). Measuring board performance in non-profit sport organizations. Australian Journal of Volunteering, 6(2), 109–116. Downloaded by [University Of South Australia Library] at 14:39 04 February 2016 Hoye, R., & Cuskelly, G. (2003). Board-executive relationships within voluntary sport organis- ations. Sport Management Review, 6(1), 53–73. Hoye, R., & Cuskelly, G. (2004). Board member selection, orientation and evaluation: Implications for board performance in member-benefit voluntary sport organisations. Third Sector Review, 10 (1), 77–100. Hoye, R., & Cuskelly, G. (2007). Sport governance. Oxford: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann. Hoye, R., & Doherty, A. (2011). Nonprofit sport board performance: A review and directions for future research. Journal of Sport Management, 25(3), 272–285. Inglis, S. (1997). Roles of the board in amateur sport organizations. Journal of Sport Management, 11, 160–176. Jensen, M. C. (1993). The Modern Industrial Revolution, exit, and the failure of internal control systems. Journal of Finance, 48(3), 831–880. Mason, D. S., Thibault, L., & Misener, L. (2006). An agency theory perspective on corruption in sport: The case of the International Olympic Committee. Journal of Sport Management, 20, 52–73. O’Boyle, I. (2015). Facilitative leadership in sport management. In I. O’Boyle, D. Murray, & P. Cummins (Eds.), Leadership in sport (pp. 81–94). London: Routledge. O’Boyle, I., & Bradbury, T. (2013). Sport governance: International case studies. London: Routledge. Papadimitriou, D. (2007). Conceptualizing effectiveness in a non-profit organizational environ- ment: An exploratory study. International Journal of Public Sector Management, 20, 571–587. Papadimitriou, D., & Taylor, P. (2000). Organisational effectiveness of Hellenic national sports organisations: A multiple constituency approach. Sport Management Review, 3, 23–46. Pollio, H. R., Henley, T., & Thompson, C. B. (1997). The phenomenology of everyday life. New York: Cambridge University Press. Quinn, P. (2002). Enhancing community identity: GAA strategic review. Dublin: Author. Rosenau, J. N. (1995). Governance in the twenty-first century. Global Governance, 1(1), 13–43. Sherry, E., & Shilbury, D. (2009). Board directors and conflict of interest: A study of a sport league. European Sport Management Quarterly, 9, 47–62. Shilbury, D. (2001). Examining board member roles, functions and influence: A study of Victorian sporting organisations. International Journal of Sport Management, 2, 253–281. Shilbury, D., & Ferkins, L. (2011). Professionalisation, sport governance and strategic capability. Managing Leisure, 16(2), 108–127. Shilbury, D., Ferkins, L., & Smythe, L. (2013). Sport governance encounters: Insights from lived experiences. Sport Management Review, 16, 349–363. Slesinger, L. H. (1991). Self-assessment for non-profit governing boards. Washington, DC: National Centre for Nonprofit Boards. SPARC. (2006). Nine steps to effective governance: Building high performing organisations (2nd ed.). Wellington: Author. Taylor, M., & O’Sullivan, N. (2009). How should National Governing Bodies of sport be governed in the UK? An exploratory study of board structure. Corporate Governance: An International Review, 17, 681–693. UK Sport (2004). Good governance guide for national governing bodies. London: Author. Wright, B. E., & Millesen, J. L. (2008). Nonprofit board role ambiguity: Investigating its prevalence, antecedents, and consequences. American Review of Public Administration, 38, 322–338. Yeh, C. M., Hoye, R., & Taylor, T. (2011). Board roles and strategic orientation among Taiwanese nonprofit sport organisations. Managing Leisure, 287–301. Yeh, C., & Taylor, T. L. (2008). Issues of governance in sport organisations: A question of board size, structure and roles. World Leisure Journal, 50(1), 33–45. Yeh, C. M., Taylor, T. & Hoye, R. (2009). Board roles in organisations with a dual board system: Empirical evidence from Taiwanese nonprofit sport organisations. Sport Management Review, 12, 91–100. Zahra, S. A., & Pearce, J. A. (1989). Boards of directors and corporate financial performance: A review and integrative model. Journal of Management, 15(2), 291–334.",
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Board composition in federated structures: a case study of the Gaelic Athletic Association. / O'Boyle, Ian; Hassan, David.

In: World Leisure Journal, Vol. 51, 03.02.2016, p. 109-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Board composition in federated structures: a case study of the Gaelic Athletic Association

AU - O'Boyle, Ian

AU - Hassan, David

N1 - Accepted 2015 Reference text: Australian Sports Commission. (2005). Governing sport: The role of the board, a good practice guide to sporting organisations. Canberra: Author. Australian Sports Commission. (2012). Governance principles. Canberra: Author. Australian Sports Commission. (2013). Mandatory governance principles. Canberra: Author. Bayle, E., & Robinson, L. (2007). A framework for understanding the performance of national gov- erning bodies of sport. European Sport Management Quarterly, 7, 249–268. Boyce, C., & Neale, P. (2006). Conducting in-depth interviews: A guide for designing and conducting in-depth interviews for evaluation input. Watertown, MA: Pathfinder International. Bradshaw, P., Murray, V., & Wolpin, J. (1992). Do nonprofit boards make a difference? An explora- tion of the relationships among board structure, process, and effectiveness. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 21(3), 227–249. Crawford, D. A., & Carter, C. B. (2011). A good governance structure for Australian cricket. Melbourne: Cricket Australia. Dalton, D. R., Daily, C. M., Johnson, J. L., & Ellstrand, A. E. (1999). Number of directors and finan- cial performance: A meta-analysis. Academy of Management Journal, 42(6), 674–686. Doherty, A., & Carron, A. V. (2003). Cohesion in volunteer sport executive committees. Journal of Sport Management, 17, 116–141. Doherty, A., & Hoye, R. (2011). Role ambiguity and volunteer board member performance in non- profit sport organizations. Nonprofit Management and Leadership, 22(1), 107–128. Edwards, A., & Skinner, J. (2009). Qualitative research in sport management. Oxford: Elsevier. Europa. (2011). Fama, E. F., & Jensen, M. C. (1983). Separation of ownership and control. Journal of Law and Economics, 26, 301–326. Ferkins, L., & Shilbury. (2010). Ferkins, L., & Shilbury, D. (2012). Good boards are strategic: What does that mean for sport gov- ernance? Journal of Sport Management, 26, 67–80. Ferkins, L., Shilbury, D., & McDonald, G. (2005). The role of the board in building strategic capa- bility: Toward an integrated model of sport governance research. Sport Management Review, 8 (3), 195–225. Ferkins, L., Shilbury, D., & McDonald, G. (2009). Hassan, D. (2010). Governance and the Gaelic Athletic Association: Time to move beyond the amateur ideal? Soccer & Society, 11(4), 414–427. Herman, R. D., & Renz, D. O. (2008). Advancing nonprofit organizational effectiveness research and theory. Nonprofit Management & Leadership, 18, 399–415. Hood, J. (1995). The Hood report: A path to superior performance. Christchurch: New Zealand Cricket. Hoye, R. (2004). Leader-member exchanges and board performance of voluntary sport organiz- ations. Non-profit Management & Leadership, 15(1), 55–70. Hoye, R. (2006). Leadership within voluntary sport organization boards. Non-profit Management & Leadership, 16(3), 297–313. Hoye, R., & Auld, C. (2001). Measuring board performance in non-profit sport organizations. Australian Journal of Volunteering, 6(2), 109–116. Downloaded by [University Of South Australia Library] at 14:39 04 February 2016 Hoye, R., & Cuskelly, G. (2003). Board-executive relationships within voluntary sport organis- ations. Sport Management Review, 6(1), 53–73. Hoye, R., & Cuskelly, G. (2004). Board member selection, orientation and evaluation: Implications for board performance in member-benefit voluntary sport organisations. Third Sector Review, 10 (1), 77–100. Hoye, R., & Cuskelly, G. (2007). Sport governance. Oxford: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann. Hoye, R., & Doherty, A. (2011). Nonprofit sport board performance: A review and directions for future research. Journal of Sport Management, 25(3), 272–285. Inglis, S. (1997). Roles of the board in amateur sport organizations. Journal of Sport Management, 11, 160–176. Jensen, M. C. (1993). The Modern Industrial Revolution, exit, and the failure of internal control systems. Journal of Finance, 48(3), 831–880. Mason, D. S., Thibault, L., & Misener, L. (2006). An agency theory perspective on corruption in sport: The case of the International Olympic Committee. Journal of Sport Management, 20, 52–73. O’Boyle, I. (2015). Facilitative leadership in sport management. In I. O’Boyle, D. Murray, & P. Cummins (Eds.), Leadership in sport (pp. 81–94). London: Routledge. O’Boyle, I., & Bradbury, T. (2013). Sport governance: International case studies. London: Routledge. Papadimitriou, D. (2007). Conceptualizing effectiveness in a non-profit organizational environ- ment: An exploratory study. International Journal of Public Sector Management, 20, 571–587. Papadimitriou, D., & Taylor, P. (2000). Organisational effectiveness of Hellenic national sports organisations: A multiple constituency approach. Sport Management Review, 3, 23–46. Pollio, H. R., Henley, T., & Thompson, C. B. (1997). The phenomenology of everyday life. New York: Cambridge University Press. Quinn, P. (2002). Enhancing community identity: GAA strategic review. Dublin: Author. Rosenau, J. N. (1995). Governance in the twenty-first century. Global Governance, 1(1), 13–43. Sherry, E., & Shilbury, D. (2009). Board directors and conflict of interest: A study of a sport league. European Sport Management Quarterly, 9, 47–62. Shilbury, D. (2001). Examining board member roles, functions and influence: A study of Victorian sporting organisations. International Journal of Sport Management, 2, 253–281. Shilbury, D., & Ferkins, L. (2011). Professionalisation, sport governance and strategic capability. Managing Leisure, 16(2), 108–127. Shilbury, D., Ferkins, L., & Smythe, L. (2013). Sport governance encounters: Insights from lived experiences. Sport Management Review, 16, 349–363. Slesinger, L. H. (1991). Self-assessment for non-profit governing boards. Washington, DC: National Centre for Nonprofit Boards. SPARC. (2006). Nine steps to effective governance: Building high performing organisations (2nd ed.). Wellington: Author. Taylor, M., & O’Sullivan, N. (2009). How should National Governing Bodies of sport be governed in the UK? An exploratory study of board structure. Corporate Governance: An International Review, 17, 681–693. UK Sport (2004). Good governance guide for national governing bodies. London: Author. Wright, B. E., & Millesen, J. L. (2008). Nonprofit board role ambiguity: Investigating its prevalence, antecedents, and consequences. American Review of Public Administration, 38, 322–338. Yeh, C. M., Hoye, R., & Taylor, T. (2011). Board roles and strategic orientation among Taiwanese nonprofit sport organisations. Managing Leisure, 287–301. Yeh, C., & Taylor, T. L. (2008). Issues of governance in sport organisations: A question of board size, structure and roles. World Leisure Journal, 50(1), 33–45. Yeh, C. M., Taylor, T. & Hoye, R. (2009). Board roles in organisations with a dual board system: Empirical evidence from Taiwanese nonprofit sport organisations. Sport Management Review, 12, 91–100. Zahra, S. A., & Pearce, J. A. (1989). Boards of directors and corporate financial performance: A review and integrative model. Journal of Management, 15(2), 291–334.

PY - 2016/2/3

Y1 - 2016/2/3

N2 - ABSTRACTThis paper examines the issue of board composition within non- profit sport organizations operating in a federated governance structure. The Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) is used as a case study to illustrate the challenges and complexities of comprising a board that has the requisite skill set to carry out its function in a rapidly changing operating environment. Interviews (n = 10) supported by document analysis were conducted with senior ranking officials within the Association in order to analyse the integral factors related to board composition within the GAA. Findings show that the Association heavily relies on the delegate system of board composition, potentially limiting its ability to appoint a board that has a commercially orientated focus reflecting the professionalization and commercialization of the contemporary sport industry. Practical and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed along with suggestions for future research.

AB - ABSTRACTThis paper examines the issue of board composition within non- profit sport organizations operating in a federated governance structure. The Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) is used as a case study to illustrate the challenges and complexities of comprising a board that has the requisite skill set to carry out its function in a rapidly changing operating environment. Interviews (n = 10) supported by document analysis were conducted with senior ranking officials within the Association in order to analyse the integral factors related to board composition within the GAA. Findings show that the Association heavily relies on the delegate system of board composition, potentially limiting its ability to appoint a board that has a commercially orientated focus reflecting the professionalization and commercialization of the contemporary sport industry. Practical and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed along with suggestions for future research.

KW - Governance

KW - Sport Management

KW - GAA

KW - Board

U2 - 10.1080/16078055.2015.1136839

DO - 10.1080/16078055.2015.1136839

M3 - Article

VL - 51

SP - 109

EP - 123

JO - World Leisure Journal

T2 - World Leisure Journal

JF - World Leisure Journal

SN - 1607-8055

ER -