Birds of a Feather Session: “Autonomic Computing: Panacea or Poppycock?”

R Sterritt, MG Hinchey

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Autonomic computing arose out of a need for a means to cope with rapidly growing complexity of integrating, managing, and operating computer-based systems as well as a need to reduce the total cost of ownership of today's systems. The vision is to create selfware through self-* properties. The initial set of properties, in terms of objectives, were self-configuring, self-healing, self-optimizing and self-protecting, along with attributes of self-awareness, self-monitoring and self-adjusting. This self-* list has grown: self-anticipating, self-critical, self-defining, self-destructing, self-diagnosis, self-governing, self-organized, self-reflecting, and self-simulation, for instance. We believe that autonomic computing has much to offer in the advancement of complex computer-based systems. We expect to see many additional self-* properties being added to the portfolio of behaviors expected of an autonomic computing system. We anticipate many new biologically-inspired metaphors being developed and incorporated into future autonomic systems.

Conference

ConferenceIEEE Workshop on the Engineering of Autonomic Systems (EASe 2005) at 12th Annual IEEE International Conference and Workshop on the Engineering of Computer Based Systems (ECBS 2005)
Period1/04/05 → …

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Sterritt, R., & Hinchey, MG. (2005). Birds of a Feather Session: “Autonomic Computing: Panacea or Poppycock?”. In Unknown Host Publication (pp. 335-341)
Sterritt, R ; Hinchey, MG. / Birds of a Feather Session: “Autonomic Computing: Panacea or Poppycock?”. Unknown Host Publication. 2005. pp. 335-341
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title = "Birds of a Feather Session: “Autonomic Computing: Panacea or Poppycock?”",
abstract = "Autonomic computing arose out of a need for a means to cope with rapidly growing complexity of integrating, managing, and operating computer-based systems as well as a need to reduce the total cost of ownership of today's systems. The vision is to create selfware through self-* properties. The initial set of properties, in terms of objectives, were self-configuring, self-healing, self-optimizing and self-protecting, along with attributes of self-awareness, self-monitoring and self-adjusting. This self-* list has grown: self-anticipating, self-critical, self-defining, self-destructing, self-diagnosis, self-governing, self-organized, self-reflecting, and self-simulation, for instance. We believe that autonomic computing has much to offer in the advancement of complex computer-based systems. We expect to see many additional self-* properties being added to the portfolio of behaviors expected of an autonomic computing system. We anticipate many new biologically-inspired metaphors being developed and incorporated into future autonomic systems.",
author = "R Sterritt and MG Hinchey",
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Sterritt, R & Hinchey, MG 2005, Birds of a Feather Session: “Autonomic Computing: Panacea or Poppycock?”. in Unknown Host Publication. pp. 335-341, IEEE Workshop on the Engineering of Autonomic Systems (EASe 2005) at 12th Annual IEEE International Conference and Workshop on the Engineering of Computer Based Systems (ECBS 2005), 1/04/05.

Birds of a Feather Session: “Autonomic Computing: Panacea or Poppycock?”. / Sterritt, R; Hinchey, MG.

Unknown Host Publication. 2005. p. 335-341.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AU - Hinchey, MG

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N2 - Autonomic computing arose out of a need for a means to cope with rapidly growing complexity of integrating, managing, and operating computer-based systems as well as a need to reduce the total cost of ownership of today's systems. The vision is to create selfware through self-* properties. The initial set of properties, in terms of objectives, were self-configuring, self-healing, self-optimizing and self-protecting, along with attributes of self-awareness, self-monitoring and self-adjusting. This self-* list has grown: self-anticipating, self-critical, self-defining, self-destructing, self-diagnosis, self-governing, self-organized, self-reflecting, and self-simulation, for instance. We believe that autonomic computing has much to offer in the advancement of complex computer-based systems. We expect to see many additional self-* properties being added to the portfolio of behaviors expected of an autonomic computing system. We anticipate many new biologically-inspired metaphors being developed and incorporated into future autonomic systems.

AB - Autonomic computing arose out of a need for a means to cope with rapidly growing complexity of integrating, managing, and operating computer-based systems as well as a need to reduce the total cost of ownership of today's systems. The vision is to create selfware through self-* properties. The initial set of properties, in terms of objectives, were self-configuring, self-healing, self-optimizing and self-protecting, along with attributes of self-awareness, self-monitoring and self-adjusting. This self-* list has grown: self-anticipating, self-critical, self-defining, self-destructing, self-diagnosis, self-governing, self-organized, self-reflecting, and self-simulation, for instance. We believe that autonomic computing has much to offer in the advancement of complex computer-based systems. We expect to see many additional self-* properties being added to the portfolio of behaviors expected of an autonomic computing system. We anticipate many new biologically-inspired metaphors being developed and incorporated into future autonomic systems.

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BT - Unknown Host Publication

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Sterritt R, Hinchey MG. Birds of a Feather Session: “Autonomic Computing: Panacea or Poppycock?”. In Unknown Host Publication. 2005. p. 335-341