Biomolecule Damage (DNA and Lipid) is elevated in patients with Type 1 diabetes with and without diabetic complications.

Mary P.A Hannon-Fletcher, Maurice O'Kane, Ken Moles, Yvonne Barnett, Colin Weatherup

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There is strong evidence that oxidative stress is involved in the aetiology and pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications. Increased production of reactive oxygen species in vivo can lead to cellular biomolecule damage, such as lipid peroxidation and DNA damage.The aim of this study was to determine the extent of this damage by measuring in vivo antioxidant status, levels of lipid peroxidation, and levels of neutrophil DNA damage in 50 participants with type 1 diabetes and 50 age- and sex-matched, healthy controls.Gylcaemic control (%HbA1c) was relatively good with a group mean of 7.71% which increased to 8.12 % in those with complications. Compared to the control group there were significantly elevated levels of neutrophil DNA damage (% tail DNA, p
LanguageEnglish
Pages95-102
JournalJournal of Nutritional Therapeutics
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2014

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Diabetes Complications
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
DNA Damage
Lipids
Lipid Peroxidation
Neutrophils
Reactive Oxygen Species
Oxidative Stress
Antioxidants
Control Groups
DNA

Cite this

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Biomolecule Damage (DNA and Lipid) is elevated in patients with Type 1 diabetes with and without diabetic complications. / Hannon-Fletcher, Mary P.A; O'Kane, Maurice; Moles, Ken; Barnett, Yvonne; Weatherup, Colin.

In: Journal of Nutritional Therapeutics, Vol. 3, No. 2, 15.06.2014, p. 95-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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