BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF DISTILLERY WASTE FOR POLLUTION-REMEDIATION

FJ Fitzgibbon, Poonam Singh - Nee Nigam, D Singh, R Marchant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The biological treatment of spent wash from molasses distilleries was investigated. Analysis of raw spent wash showed it to be a recalcitrant waste, with a high COD of 85,170 mg/l and containing inhibitory phenolic compounds. Reverse phase thin layer chromatography identified gallic and vanillic acid present in spent wash. The fungi Geotrichum candidum, Coriolus versicolor; Phanerochaete chyrsosporium and Mycelia sterilia were screened for their ability to decolourize spent wash and to reduce the COD level. A 10 day pretreatment with Geotrichum candidum at 30 degrees C resulted in reducing the COD by 53.17% and total phenols by 47.82%, enabling other bioremediating organisms to grow. Coriolus verisicolor immobilized in a packed-bed reactor reduced the COD of spent wash by a further 50.3% giving an overall reduction in COD of 77% to 15,780 mg/l. A small amount of decolourization was achieved (4.2%), although the spent wash was still coloured. Present studies are encouraging and indicate that it is possible to bioremediate spent wash using a multi-stage treatment process involving an intial pretreatment step with Geotrichum candidum.
LanguageEnglish
Pages293-301
JournalJOURNAL OF BASIC MICROBIOLOGY
Volume35
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1995

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Geotrichum
Vanillic Acid
Phanerochaete
Molasses
Gallic Acid
Phenols
Mycelium
Reverse-Phase Chromatography
Thin Layer Chromatography
Fungi
Environmental Restoration and Remediation

Cite this

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title = "BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF DISTILLERY WASTE FOR POLLUTION-REMEDIATION",
abstract = "The biological treatment of spent wash from molasses distilleries was investigated. Analysis of raw spent wash showed it to be a recalcitrant waste, with a high COD of 85,170 mg/l and containing inhibitory phenolic compounds. Reverse phase thin layer chromatography identified gallic and vanillic acid present in spent wash. The fungi Geotrichum candidum, Coriolus versicolor; Phanerochaete chyrsosporium and Mycelia sterilia were screened for their ability to decolourize spent wash and to reduce the COD level. A 10 day pretreatment with Geotrichum candidum at 30 degrees C resulted in reducing the COD by 53.17{\%} and total phenols by 47.82{\%}, enabling other bioremediating organisms to grow. Coriolus verisicolor immobilized in a packed-bed reactor reduced the COD of spent wash by a further 50.3{\%} giving an overall reduction in COD of 77{\%} to 15,780 mg/l. A small amount of decolourization was achieved (4.2{\%}), although the spent wash was still coloured. Present studies are encouraging and indicate that it is possible to bioremediate spent wash using a multi-stage treatment process involving an intial pretreatment step with Geotrichum candidum.",
author = "FJ Fitzgibbon and {Singh - Nee Nigam}, Poonam and D Singh and R Marchant",
year = "1995",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "293--301",
journal = "Jounal of Basic Microbiology",
issn = "0233-111X",
number = "5",

}

BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF DISTILLERY WASTE FOR POLLUTION-REMEDIATION. / Fitzgibbon, FJ; Singh - Nee Nigam, Poonam; Singh, D; Marchant, R.

In: JOURNAL OF BASIC MICROBIOLOGY, Vol. 35, No. 5, 1995, p. 293-301.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF DISTILLERY WASTE FOR POLLUTION-REMEDIATION

AU - Fitzgibbon, FJ

AU - Singh - Nee Nigam, Poonam

AU - Singh, D

AU - Marchant, R

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Y1 - 1995

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AB - The biological treatment of spent wash from molasses distilleries was investigated. Analysis of raw spent wash showed it to be a recalcitrant waste, with a high COD of 85,170 mg/l and containing inhibitory phenolic compounds. Reverse phase thin layer chromatography identified gallic and vanillic acid present in spent wash. The fungi Geotrichum candidum, Coriolus versicolor; Phanerochaete chyrsosporium and Mycelia sterilia were screened for their ability to decolourize spent wash and to reduce the COD level. A 10 day pretreatment with Geotrichum candidum at 30 degrees C resulted in reducing the COD by 53.17% and total phenols by 47.82%, enabling other bioremediating organisms to grow. Coriolus verisicolor immobilized in a packed-bed reactor reduced the COD of spent wash by a further 50.3% giving an overall reduction in COD of 77% to 15,780 mg/l. A small amount of decolourization was achieved (4.2%), although the spent wash was still coloured. Present studies are encouraging and indicate that it is possible to bioremediate spent wash using a multi-stage treatment process involving an intial pretreatment step with Geotrichum candidum.

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