Benefiting a regional economy with societal-driven innovation adoption in high-tech small firms

Brendan Galbraith, Kirsty McManus

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A key question is how do business models ensure that new high-tech innovations are responsible, benefit society and are well aligned to regional policy? This is an increasingly important question for policy-makers and high tech small firms in Northern Ireland. The question is important because although innovation adoption in high-tech small firms (HTSFs) has long been a United Kingdom and European priority, and despite decades of attention, there is still a dearth of innovative HTSFs and, worryingly low participation levels of HTSFs in United Kingdom and European Research & Development and innovation funding programmes. To capitalise on emerging high-tech markets, it is imperative that HTSFs have the capacity to exploit these new opportunities and crucially, to contribute to the development of a modern economy. Research carried out by Ulster University Business School in European projects investigated how policy can help address the dearth of SMEs in European and national innovation funding programmes. The growth of innovative HTSFs has the potential to contribute to both the economic and social development of a regional economy. However, the mainstream business model frameworks that are used to develop value propositions of high-tech innovations are exclusively focused on the corporate perspective and do not encompass the benefit to society. This presentation addresses these issues and looks at how the research findings might influence the development of policy in Northern Ireland. Finally, this presentation looks ahead to ongoing engagement with the SME sector in Northern Ireland including the creation of the Centre for SME Development, located in the Ulster University Business School. This presentation was delivered in the Long Gallery, Parliament Buildings, Stormont Estate and the event was opened by Nelson McCausland MLA.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
Pages1-9
Number of pages9
Publication statusPublished - 18 Feb 2015
EventKnowledge Exchange Seminar Series - Parliament Buildings, Stormont, Belfast
Duration: 18 Feb 2015 → …

Conference

ConferenceKnowledge Exchange Seminar Series
Period18/02/15 → …

Fingerprint

High-tech
Small firms
Regional economy
Innovation adoption
Innovation
Northern Ireland
Small and medium-sized enterprises
Business schools
Funding
Business model
Regional policy
Social development
Economic development
Politicians
Participation
Parliament
Value proposition

Cite this

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abstract = "A key question is how do business models ensure that new high-tech innovations are responsible, benefit society and are well aligned to regional policy? This is an increasingly important question for policy-makers and high tech small firms in Northern Ireland. The question is important because although innovation adoption in high-tech small firms (HTSFs) has long been a United Kingdom and European priority, and despite decades of attention, there is still a dearth of innovative HTSFs and, worryingly low participation levels of HTSFs in United Kingdom and European Research & Development and innovation funding programmes. To capitalise on emerging high-tech markets, it is imperative that HTSFs have the capacity to exploit these new opportunities and crucially, to contribute to the development of a modern economy. Research carried out by Ulster University Business School in European projects investigated how policy can help address the dearth of SMEs in European and national innovation funding programmes. The growth of innovative HTSFs has the potential to contribute to both the economic and social development of a regional economy. However, the mainstream business model frameworks that are used to develop value propositions of high-tech innovations are exclusively focused on the corporate perspective and do not encompass the benefit to society. This presentation addresses these issues and looks at how the research findings might influence the development of policy in Northern Ireland. Finally, this presentation looks ahead to ongoing engagement with the SME sector in Northern Ireland including the creation of the Centre for SME Development, located in the Ulster University Business School. This presentation was delivered in the Long Gallery, Parliament Buildings, Stormont Estate and the event was opened by Nelson McCausland MLA.",
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Galbraith, B & McManus, K 2015, Benefiting a regional economy with societal-driven innovation adoption in high-tech small firms. in Unknown Host Publication. pp. 1-9, Knowledge Exchange Seminar Series, 18/02/15.

Benefiting a regional economy with societal-driven innovation adoption in high-tech small firms. / Galbraith, Brendan; McManus, Kirsty.

Unknown Host Publication. 2015. p. 1-9.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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