Atomic Layer Deposition of a Silver Nanolayer on Advanced Titanium Orthopedic Implants Inhibits Bacterial Colonization and Supports Vascularized de Novo Bone Ingrowth

Aine Devlin-Mullin, Naomi M. Todd, Zahra Golrokhi, Hua Geng, Moritz A. Konerding, Nigel G. Ternan, John A. Hunt, Richard J. Potter, Chris Sutcliffe, Eric Jones, Peter D. Lee, Christopher A. Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Joint replacement surgery is associated with significant morbidity and mortality following infection with either methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Staphylococcus epidermidis. These organisms have strong biofilm-forming capability in deep wounds and on prosthetic surfaces, with 103 -104 microbes resulting in clinically significant infections. To inhibit biofilm formation, we developed 3D titanium structures using selective laser melting and then coated them with a silver nanolayer using atomic layer deposition. On bare titanium scaffolds, S. epidermidis growth was slow but on silver-coated implants there were significant further reductions in both bacterial recovery (p <0.0001) and biofilm formation (p <0.001). MRSA growth was similarly slow on bare titanium scaffolds and not further affected by silver coating. Ultrastructural examination and viability assays using either human bone or endothelial cells, demonstrated strong adherence and growth on titanium-only or silver-coated implants. Histological, X-ray computed microtomographic, and ultrastructural analyses revealed that silver-coated titanium scaffolds implanted into 2.5 mm defects in rat tibia promoted robust vascularization and conspicuous bone ingrowth. We conclude that nanolayer silver of titanium implants significantly reduces pathogenic biofilm formation in vitro, facilitates vascularization and osseointegration in vivo making this a promising technique for clinical orthopedic applications.
LanguageEnglish
Number of pages14
JournalAdvanced Healthcare Materials
Volume6
Issue number11
Early online date21 Mar 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jun 2017

Fingerprint

Atomic layer deposition
Orthopedics
Titanium
Silver
Bone
Biofilms
Bone and Bones
Scaffolds
Methicillin
Staphylococcus epidermidis
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Replacement Arthroplasties
Growth
Osseointegration
Endothelial cells
Prosthetics
Infection
Tibia
Surgery
Freezing

Keywords

  • Staphylococcus epidermidis
  • angiogenesis
  • atomic layer deposition
  • bone
  • methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
  • silver
  • titanium

Cite this

Devlin-Mullin, Aine ; Todd, Naomi M. ; Golrokhi, Zahra ; Geng, Hua ; Konerding, Moritz A. ; Ternan, Nigel G. ; Hunt, John A. ; Potter, Richard J. ; Sutcliffe, Chris ; Jones, Eric ; Lee, Peter D. ; Mitchell, Christopher A. / Atomic Layer Deposition of a Silver Nanolayer on Advanced Titanium Orthopedic Implants Inhibits Bacterial Colonization and Supports Vascularized de Novo Bone Ingrowth. In: Advanced Healthcare Materials. 2017 ; Vol. 6, No. 11.
@article{eb9e5269ee474dbb9d8fda6b515d76ed,
title = "Atomic Layer Deposition of a Silver Nanolayer on Advanced Titanium Orthopedic Implants Inhibits Bacterial Colonization and Supports Vascularized de Novo Bone Ingrowth",
abstract = "Joint replacement surgery is associated with significant morbidity and mortality following infection with either methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Staphylococcus epidermidis. These organisms have strong biofilm-forming capability in deep wounds and on prosthetic surfaces, with 103 -104 microbes resulting in clinically significant infections. To inhibit biofilm formation, we developed 3D titanium structures using selective laser melting and then coated them with a silver nanolayer using atomic layer deposition. On bare titanium scaffolds, S. epidermidis growth was slow but on silver-coated implants there were significant further reductions in both bacterial recovery (p <0.0001) and biofilm formation (p <0.001). MRSA growth was similarly slow on bare titanium scaffolds and not further affected by silver coating. Ultrastructural examination and viability assays using either human bone or endothelial cells, demonstrated strong adherence and growth on titanium-only or silver-coated implants. Histological, X-ray computed microtomographic, and ultrastructural analyses revealed that silver-coated titanium scaffolds implanted into 2.5 mm defects in rat tibia promoted robust vascularization and conspicuous bone ingrowth. We conclude that nanolayer silver of titanium implants significantly reduces pathogenic biofilm formation in vitro, facilitates vascularization and osseointegration in vivo making this a promising technique for clinical orthopedic applications.",
keywords = "Staphylococcus epidermidis, angiogenesis, atomic layer deposition, bone, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, silver, titanium",
author = "Aine Devlin-Mullin and Todd, {Naomi M.} and Zahra Golrokhi and Hua Geng and Konerding, {Moritz A.} and Ternan, {Nigel G.} and Hunt, {John A.} and Potter, {Richard J.} and Chris Sutcliffe and Eric Jones and Lee, {Peter D.} and Mitchell, {Christopher A.}",
note = "Not compliant in UIR, but is an Open Access article; evidence uploaded to 'Other files'",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1002/adhm.201700033",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
journal = "Advanced Healthcare Materials",
issn = "2192-2640",
number = "11",

}

Atomic Layer Deposition of a Silver Nanolayer on Advanced Titanium Orthopedic Implants Inhibits Bacterial Colonization and Supports Vascularized de Novo Bone Ingrowth. / Devlin-Mullin, Aine; Todd, Naomi M.; Golrokhi, Zahra; Geng, Hua; Konerding, Moritz A.; Ternan, Nigel G.; Hunt, John A.; Potter, Richard J.; Sutcliffe, Chris; Jones, Eric; Lee, Peter D.; Mitchell, Christopher A.

In: Advanced Healthcare Materials, Vol. 6, No. 11, 07.06.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Atomic Layer Deposition of a Silver Nanolayer on Advanced Titanium Orthopedic Implants Inhibits Bacterial Colonization and Supports Vascularized de Novo Bone Ingrowth

AU - Devlin-Mullin, Aine

AU - Todd, Naomi M.

AU - Golrokhi, Zahra

AU - Geng, Hua

AU - Konerding, Moritz A.

AU - Ternan, Nigel G.

AU - Hunt, John A.

AU - Potter, Richard J.

AU - Sutcliffe, Chris

AU - Jones, Eric

AU - Lee, Peter D.

AU - Mitchell, Christopher A.

N1 - Not compliant in UIR, but is an Open Access article; evidence uploaded to 'Other files'

PY - 2017/6/7

Y1 - 2017/6/7

N2 - Joint replacement surgery is associated with significant morbidity and mortality following infection with either methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Staphylococcus epidermidis. These organisms have strong biofilm-forming capability in deep wounds and on prosthetic surfaces, with 103 -104 microbes resulting in clinically significant infections. To inhibit biofilm formation, we developed 3D titanium structures using selective laser melting and then coated them with a silver nanolayer using atomic layer deposition. On bare titanium scaffolds, S. epidermidis growth was slow but on silver-coated implants there were significant further reductions in both bacterial recovery (p <0.0001) and biofilm formation (p <0.001). MRSA growth was similarly slow on bare titanium scaffolds and not further affected by silver coating. Ultrastructural examination and viability assays using either human bone or endothelial cells, demonstrated strong adherence and growth on titanium-only or silver-coated implants. Histological, X-ray computed microtomographic, and ultrastructural analyses revealed that silver-coated titanium scaffolds implanted into 2.5 mm defects in rat tibia promoted robust vascularization and conspicuous bone ingrowth. We conclude that nanolayer silver of titanium implants significantly reduces pathogenic biofilm formation in vitro, facilitates vascularization and osseointegration in vivo making this a promising technique for clinical orthopedic applications.

AB - Joint replacement surgery is associated with significant morbidity and mortality following infection with either methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Staphylococcus epidermidis. These organisms have strong biofilm-forming capability in deep wounds and on prosthetic surfaces, with 103 -104 microbes resulting in clinically significant infections. To inhibit biofilm formation, we developed 3D titanium structures using selective laser melting and then coated them with a silver nanolayer using atomic layer deposition. On bare titanium scaffolds, S. epidermidis growth was slow but on silver-coated implants there were significant further reductions in both bacterial recovery (p <0.0001) and biofilm formation (p <0.001). MRSA growth was similarly slow on bare titanium scaffolds and not further affected by silver coating. Ultrastructural examination and viability assays using either human bone or endothelial cells, demonstrated strong adherence and growth on titanium-only or silver-coated implants. Histological, X-ray computed microtomographic, and ultrastructural analyses revealed that silver-coated titanium scaffolds implanted into 2.5 mm defects in rat tibia promoted robust vascularization and conspicuous bone ingrowth. We conclude that nanolayer silver of titanium implants significantly reduces pathogenic biofilm formation in vitro, facilitates vascularization and osseointegration in vivo making this a promising technique for clinical orthopedic applications.

KW - Staphylococcus epidermidis

KW - angiogenesis

KW - atomic layer deposition

KW - bone

KW - methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

KW - silver

KW - titanium

U2 - 10.1002/adhm.201700033

DO - 10.1002/adhm.201700033

M3 - Article

VL - 6

JO - Advanced Healthcare Materials

T2 - Advanced Healthcare Materials

JF - Advanced Healthcare Materials

SN - 2192-2640

IS - 11

ER -