Assessing possible DSM-5 ASD subtypes in a sample of victims meeting caseness for DSM-5 ASD based on self-report following multiple forms of traumatic exposure

Maj Hansen, Cherie Armour, Li Wang, Ask Elklit, Richard A. Bryant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acute stress disorder (ASD) was introduced into the DSM-IV to recognize early traumatic responses and as a precursor of PTSD. Although the diagnostic criteria for ASD were altered and structured more similarly to the PTSD definition in DSM-5, only the PTSD diagnosis includes a dissociative subtype. Emerging research has indicated that there also appears to be a highly symptomatic subtype for ASD. However, the specific nature of the subtype is currently unclear. The present study investigates the possible presence of ASD subtypes in a mixed sample of victims meeting caseness for DSM-5 ASD based on self-report following four different types of traumatic exposure (N = 472). The results of latent profile analysis revealed a 5-class solution. The highly symptomatic class was marked by high endorsement on avoidance and dissociation compared to the other classes. Findings are discussed in regard to its clinical implications including the implications for the pending the ICD-11 and the recently released DSM-5.
LanguageEnglish
Pages84-89
JournalJournal of Anxiety Disorders
Volume31
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute
Self Report
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Dissociative Disorders
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Research

Keywords

  • Acute stress disorder
  • Latent profile analysis
  • ASD subtypes
  • DSM-5
  • ICD-11

Cite this

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Assessing possible DSM-5 ASD subtypes in a sample of victims meeting caseness for DSM-5 ASD based on self-report following multiple forms of traumatic exposure. / Hansen, Maj; Armour, Cherie; Wang, Li; Elklit, Ask; Bryant, Richard A.

In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, Vol. 31, 2015, p. 84-89.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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