Aspirin, salicylates, and cancer

Peter C. Elwood, Alison Gallagher, Garry G. Duthie, Luis A. J. Mur, Gareth Morgan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

212 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evidence from a wide range of sources suggests that individuals taking aspirin and related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have reduced risk of large bowel cancer. Work in animals supports cancer reduction with aspirin, but no long-term randomised clinical trials exist in human beings, and randomisation would be ethically unacceptable because vascular protection would have to be denied to a proportion of the participants. However, opportunistic trials of aspirin, designed to test vascular protection, provide some evidence of a reduction in cancer, but only after at least 10 years. We summarise evidence for the potential benefit of aspirin and natural salicylates in cancer prevention. Possible mechanisms of action and directions for further work are discussed, and implications for clinical practice are considered.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1301-1309
JournalLancet
Volume373
Issue number9671
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2009

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Salicylates
Aspirin
Blood Vessels
Neoplasms
Random Allocation
Colonic Neoplasms
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Randomized Controlled Trials
Pharmaceutical Preparations

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Elwood, P. C., Gallagher, A., Duthie, G. G., Mur, L. A. J., & Morgan, G. (2009). Aspirin, salicylates, and cancer. Lancet, 373(9671), 1301-1309. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(09)60243-9
Elwood, Peter C. ; Gallagher, Alison ; Duthie, Garry G. ; Mur, Luis A. J. ; Morgan, Gareth. / Aspirin, salicylates, and cancer. In: Lancet. 2009 ; Vol. 373, No. 9671. pp. 1301-1309.
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Elwood, PC, Gallagher, A, Duthie, GG, Mur, LAJ & Morgan, G 2009, 'Aspirin, salicylates, and cancer', Lancet, vol. 373, no. 9671, pp. 1301-1309. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(09)60243-9

Aspirin, salicylates, and cancer. / Elwood, Peter C.; Gallagher, Alison; Duthie, Garry G.; Mur, Luis A. J.; Morgan, Gareth.

In: Lancet, Vol. 373, No. 9671, 04.2009, p. 1301-1309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Elwood PC, Gallagher A, Duthie GG, Mur LAJ, Morgan G. Aspirin, salicylates, and cancer. Lancet. 2009 Apr;373(9671):1301-1309. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(09)60243-9