Application of objective physical activity measurement in an antenatal physical activity consultation intervention: a randomised controlled trial

Sinead Currie, Marlene Sinclair, S Dianne Liddle, Alan Nevill, Marie Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Physical Activity (PA) during pregnancy has many health benefits, however, inactivity in this populationis common and PA often declines with increasing gestation. PA consultations have been useful in promoting PA in thegeneral population, however their use for addressing PA in pregnancy is unknown. This study aimed to examine if atheory-based intervention using PA consultations would reduce the magnitude of decline in objectively measured PAbetween the first and third trimesters of pregnancy.Methods: A RCT was carried out in an urban maternity unit in Northern Ireland between September 2012 and June 2013. 109 low-risk, primigravida pregnant women were randomised to a control (n = 54) or intervention group (n = 55).Intervention: Participants received three face-to-face individual PA consultations. Daily PA was measured in each trimester using seven day accelerometry. The study was approved by a NHS trust (12/NI/0036). PA data in counts per minute (CPM) were categorised into intensity using Freedson cut points and mean minutes of PA were compared between groups using repeated measures ANOVA with a sub-analysis stratifying participants per PA level in trimester one.Results: Intention to treat analysis was performed on data from 97 participants. Time in moderate, vigorous and moderate-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) significantly declined between trimesters one and three in both groups (P<0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in PA between groups in any trimester. Women in the intervention group who were less active in trimester one did not demonstrate a significant decline in MVPA throughout pregnancy (in contrast with the decline identified in the more active participants).Conclusions: The findings indicate that PA consultations were not effective in reducing the decline of MVPA inthroughout pregnancy, however, women who were less active in trimester one and received PA consultations had a lesser decrease in MVPA. It is possible that pregnant women, specifically those who are more active at the start of pregnancy, have differing needs for PA behaviour change and maintenance, requiring more intense interventions than less active women.Trial Registration: Current Controlled Trials Register ISRCTN61829137.Keywords: Physical activity, Pregnancy, Decline, Patterns, RCT, Intervention
LanguageEnglish
Pages15:1259
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Dec 2015

Fingerprint

Referral and Consultation
Randomized Controlled Trials
Exercise
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Accelerometry
Northern Ireland
Intention to Treat Analysis
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Insurance Benefits
First Pregnancy Trimester
Analysis of Variance
Maintenance

Keywords

  • Physical activity
  • Pregnancy
  • Decline
  • Patterns
  • RCT
  • Intervention

Cite this

@article{a1fe773afa37478fa064acc51fe10d1f,
title = "Application of objective physical activity measurement in an antenatal physical activity consultation intervention: a randomised controlled trial",
abstract = "Background: Physical Activity (PA) during pregnancy has many health benefits, however, inactivity in this populationis common and PA often declines with increasing gestation. PA consultations have been useful in promoting PA in thegeneral population, however their use for addressing PA in pregnancy is unknown. This study aimed to examine if atheory-based intervention using PA consultations would reduce the magnitude of decline in objectively measured PAbetween the first and third trimesters of pregnancy.Methods: A RCT was carried out in an urban maternity unit in Northern Ireland between September 2012 and June 2013. 109 low-risk, primigravida pregnant women were randomised to a control (n = 54) or intervention group (n = 55).Intervention: Participants received three face-to-face individual PA consultations. Daily PA was measured in each trimester using seven day accelerometry. The study was approved by a NHS trust (12/NI/0036). PA data in counts per minute (CPM) were categorised into intensity using Freedson cut points and mean minutes of PA were compared between groups using repeated measures ANOVA with a sub-analysis stratifying participants per PA level in trimester one.Results: Intention to treat analysis was performed on data from 97 participants. Time in moderate, vigorous and moderate-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) significantly declined between trimesters one and three in both groups (P<0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in PA between groups in any trimester. Women in the intervention group who were less active in trimester one did not demonstrate a significant decline in MVPA throughout pregnancy (in contrast with the decline identified in the more active participants).Conclusions: The findings indicate that PA consultations were not effective in reducing the decline of MVPA inthroughout pregnancy, however, women who were less active in trimester one and received PA consultations had a lesser decrease in MVPA. It is possible that pregnant women, specifically those who are more active at the start of pregnancy, have differing needs for PA behaviour change and maintenance, requiring more intense interventions than less active women.Trial Registration: Current Controlled Trials Register ISRCTN61829137.Keywords: Physical activity, Pregnancy, Decline, Patterns, RCT, Intervention",
keywords = "Physical activity, Pregnancy, Decline, Patterns, RCT, Intervention",
author = "Sinead Currie and Marlene Sinclair and Liddle, {S Dianne} and Alan Nevill and Marie Murphy",
note = "Reference text: References 1. Smith AA, Michel Y. A pilot study on the effects of aquatic exercises on discomforts of pregnancy. J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2006. doi:10.1016/.jmwh.2009.12.003. 2. van Poppel M, Oostdam N, Eekhoff M, van Mechelen W. Physical activity and maternal glucose and insulin in pregnant overweight and obese women. J Sci Med Sport. 2012. doi:10.1210/jc.2013-1570. 3. Loprinzi PD, Loprinzi KL, Cardinal BJ. The relationship between physical activity and sleep among pregnant women. Ment Health Phys Act. 2012;5:22–7. 4. Claesson I, Klein S, Sydsjo G, Josefsson A. Physical activity and psychological well-being in obese pregnant and postpartum women attending a weightgain restriction programme. Midwifery. 2014, doi:10.1016/j.midw.2012.11.006. 5. Tinloy J, Chuang CH, Zhu J, Pauli J, Kraschnewski JL, Kjerulff KH. Exercise during pregnancy and risk of late preterm birth, caesarean delivery and hospitalisations. Womens Health Issue. 2014, doi:10.1016/j.whi.2013.11.003. 6. Fraser A, Tilling K, Macdonald-Wallis C, Hughes R. Sattar N, Nelson S M, et al. Associations of gestational weight gain with maternal body mass index, waist circumference, and blood pressure measured 16 years after pregnancy: the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Am J Clin Nutr. 2011, doi:10.3945/ajcn.110.008326. Bull F, Biddle S, Buchner D, Ferguson R, Foster C, Fox K, et al. Physical Activity Guidelines in the UK: Review and Recommendations. Loughborough: Loughborough University School of Sport Exercise and Health Sciences; 2010. 8. Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists: Exercise in Pregnancy, Statement no4. 2006; https://www.rcog.org.uk/globalassets/documents/ guidelines/statements/statement-no-4.pdf. 9. Evenson KR, Savitz A, Huston SL. Leisure‐time physical activity among pregnant women in the US. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2004; doi:10.1111/j. 1365-3016.2004.00595.x. 10. Gaston A, Vamos CA. Leisure-time physical activity patterns and correlates among pregnant women in Ontario, Canada. Matern Child Health J. 2013. doi:10.1007/s10995-012-1021-z. 11. Borodulin K, Evenson K, Wen F, Herring AH, Benson A. Physical activity patterns during pregnancy. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008. doi:10.1249/MSS. 0b013e31817f1957. 12. Walsh JM, McGowan C, Byrne J, McAiliffe FM. Prevalence of physical activity among healthy pregnant women in Ireland. IJGO. 2011. doi:10.1016/j.ijgo. 2011.02.016. 13. Amezcua-Prieto C, Olmedo-Requena R, Jimenez-Mejias E, Mozas-Moreno J, Lardelli-Claret P, Jimenez-Moleon JJ. Factors associated with changes in leisure time physical activity during early pregnancy. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2013. doi:10.1016/j.ijgo.2012.11.021. 14. Santos PC, Abreu S, Moreira C, Lopes D, Santos R, Alves O, et al. Impact of compliance with different guidelines on physical activity during pregnancy and perceived barriers to leisure physical activity. J Sports Sci. 2014. doi:10.1080/02640414.2014.893369. 15. Cramp A, Bray S. Pre- and postnatal women’s leisure time physical activity patterns: A multilevel longitudinal analysis. Res Q Exerc Sport. 2009. doi:10.1080/02701367.2009.10599578. 16. Hausenblas H, Giacobbi P, Cook B, Rhodes R, Cruz A. Prospective examination of pregnant and nonpregnant women’s physical activity beliefs and behaviours. J Reprod Infant Psychol. 2011. doi:10.1080/02646838.2011.629993. 17. Sui Z, Turnbull DA, Dodd JM. Overweight and obese women’s perceptions about making healthy change during pregnancy: A mixed method study. Matern Child Health J. 2013. doi:10.1007/s10995-012-1211-8. 18. Currie S, Sinclair M, Murphy MH, Madden E, Dunwoody L, Liddle SD. Reducing the decline in physical activity during pregnancy: A systematic review of behaviour change interventions. PloS ONE. 2013. doi:10.1371/ journal.pone.0066385. 19. Shephard RJ. Limits to the measurement of habitual physical activity by questionnaires. Br J Sports Med. 2003. doi:10.1136/bjsm.37.3.197. 20. Westerterp KR. Assessment of physical activity: a critical appraisal. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2009; doi:10.1007/s00421-009-1000-2. 21. Connolly CP, Coe DP, Kendrick JM, Bassett Jr DR, Thompson DL. Accuracy of physical activity monitors in pregnant women. Med Sci Sport Exerc. 2011. doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e3182058883. 22. Harrison CL, Thompson RG, Teede HJ, Lombard CB. Measuring physical activity during pregnancy. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011. doi:10.1186/ 1479-5868-8-19. 23. Chasan-Taber L, Schmidt MD, Roberts DE, Hosmer D, Markenson G, Freedson PS. Development and validation of a pregnancy physical activity questionnaire. Med Sci Sport Exerc. 2004;36:1750–60. 24. Loughlan C, Mutrie N. Conducting an exercise consultation: Guidelines for health professionals. J Inst Health Edu. 1995;33:78–82. 25. Kirk AF, Barnett J, Mutrie N. Physical activity consultation for people with Type 2 diabetes. Evidence and guidelines. Diabet Med 2007. doi:10.1111/j. 1464-5491.2007.02190.x. 26. Fitzsimons CF, Baker G, Wright A, Nimmo MA, Thompson CW, Lowry R, et al. The ‘Walking for Wellbeing in the West’ randomised controlled trial of a pedometer-based walking programme in combination with physical activity consultation with 12 month follow-up: rationale and study design. BMC Public Health. 2008. doi:10.1186/1471-2458-8-259. 27. Fitzsimons CF, Baker G, Gray SR, Nimmo MA, Mutrie N, The Scottish Physical Activity Research Collaboration (SPARColl). Does physical activity counselling enhance the effects of a pedometer-based intervention over the long-term: 12-month findings from the Walking for Wellbeing in the west study. BMC Public Health. 2012. doi:10.1186/1471-2458-12-206. 28. Craig P, Dieppe P, Macintyre S, Michie S, Nazareth I, Petticrew M. Developing and evaluating complex interventions: the new Medical Research Council guidance. BMJ. 2008. doi:10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2012.09.010. 29. Downs DS, Chasan-Taber L, Evenson KR, Leiferman J, Yeo S. Physical activity and pregnancy: past and present evidence and future recommendations. Res Q Exerc Sport. 2012;83:485–502. 30. Schwarzer R. Modelling health behaviour change: How to predict and modify the adoption and maintenance of health behaviours. Appl Psych. 2008;57:1–29. 31. Smith AR, Leiferman JA. Psychosocial mediators to physical activity during the perinatal period: A review of the literature. J Behav Heal. 2012; doi:10.5455/jbh.20120812012004. 32. Evenson KR, Chasan-Taber L, Downs DS, Pearce EE. Review of self-reported physical activity assessments for pregnancy: Summary of the evidence for validity and reliability. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2012. doi:10.1111/j. 1365-3016.2012.01311.x. 33. American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Exercise during pregnancy and the postpartum period: ACOG Committee Opinion No. 267. Obstet Gynecol. 2002;99:171–73. 34. Currie S, Dunwoody L, Sinclair M, Liddle D, Murphy MH, Madden E. Excuses, excuses, excuses: What are the barriers to participation in an antenatal physical activity intervention? HPU. 2015;24(1):8–15. 35. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Antenatal care: Routine Care for the Healthy Pregnancy Woman. (NICE Clinical guideline 62). London: NICE; 2010. 36. Borg G. Psychophysical bases of perceived exertion. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1982;14:377–81. 37. World Health Organisation. Global Recommendations on Physical Activity for Health. Geneva: World Health Organisation; 2010. 38. Michie S, Richardson M, Johnston M, Abraham C, Francis J, Hardeman W, et al. The Behaviour Change Technique Taxonomy (v1) of 93 hierarchicallyclustered techniques: building an international consensus for the reporting of behaviour change interventions. Ann Behav Med. 2013. doi:10.1007/s12160-013-9486-6. 39. Trost SG, McIver KL, Pate RR. Conducting accelerometer-based activity assessments in field-based research. Med Sci Sport Exerc. 2005;37 Suppl 11:531–43. 40. Freedson PS, Melanson E, Sirard J. Calibration of the computer science and applications, Inc. accelerometer. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1998;30:777–81. 41. Schmidt MD, Freedson PS, Pekow P, Roberts D, Sternfeld B, Chasan-Taber L. Validation of the Kaiser Physical Activity Survey in pregnant women. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006. doi:10.1249/01.mss.0000181301.07516.d6. 42. Evenson KR, Calhoun KC, Herring AH, Pritchard D, Wen F, Steiner AZ. Association of physical activity in the past year and immediately after in vitro fertilization on pregnancy. Fertil Steril. 2014. doi:10.1016/j. fertnstert.2013.12.041. 43. Oostdam N, van Poppel M, Wouters M, Eekhoff E, Bekedam D. Kuchenbecker WK, et al. No effect of the FitFor2 exercise programme on blood glucose, insulin sensitivity, and birth weight in pregnant women who were overweight and at risk for gestational diabetes: results of a randomised controlled trial. BJOG. 2012. doi:10.1111/j.1471- 0528.2012.03366.x. 44. Matevey C, Rogers LQ, Dawson E, Tudor-Locke C. Lack of reactivity during pedometer self-monitoring in adults. Meas Phys Educ Exerc Sci. 2006; doi:10.1207/s15327841mpee1001_1. 45. Behrens TK, Dinger MK. Motion sensor reactivity in physically active young adults. Res Quart Exercise Sport. 2007; doi:10.1080/02701367. 2007.10599397. 46. Godin G, Belanger-Gravel A, Amireault A, Vohl M, Perusse L. The effect of mere-measurement of cognitions on physical activity behaviour: a randomized controlled trial among overweight and obese individuals. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011; doi:10.1186/1479-5868-8-2. 47. Morwitz VG, Johnson E, Schmittlein D. Does measuring intent change behaviour? J Consum Res. 1993;20(1):46–61. 48. Callaway LK, Colditz PB, Byrne NM, Lingwood BE, Rowlands IJ, Foxcroft K, et al. Prevention of gestational diabetes: feasibility issues for an exercise intervention in obese pregnant women. Diabetes Care 2010. doi:10.2337/ dc09-2336. 49. Weir Z, Bush J, Robson SC, McParlin C, Rankin J, Bell R. Physical activity in pregnancy: a qualitative study of the beliefs of overweight and obese pregnant women. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2010. doi:10.1186/1471-2393-10-18. 50. Heery E, McConnon A, Kelleher CC, Wall PG, McAuliffe FM. Perspectives on weight gain and lifestyle practices during pregnancy among women with a history of macrosomia: a qualitative study in the Republic of Ireland. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013. doi:10.1186/1471-2393-13-202.",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1186/s12889-015-2548-x",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "15:1259",
journal = "BMC Public Health",
issn = "1471-2458",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Application of objective physical activity measurement in an antenatal physical activity consultation intervention: a randomised controlled trial

AU - Currie, Sinead

AU - Sinclair, Marlene

AU - Liddle, S Dianne

AU - Nevill, Alan

AU - Murphy, Marie

N1 - Reference text: References 1. Smith AA, Michel Y. A pilot study on the effects of aquatic exercises on discomforts of pregnancy. J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2006. doi:10.1016/.jmwh.2009.12.003. 2. van Poppel M, Oostdam N, Eekhoff M, van Mechelen W. Physical activity and maternal glucose and insulin in pregnant overweight and obese women. J Sci Med Sport. 2012. doi:10.1210/jc.2013-1570. 3. Loprinzi PD, Loprinzi KL, Cardinal BJ. The relationship between physical activity and sleep among pregnant women. Ment Health Phys Act. 2012;5:22–7. 4. Claesson I, Klein S, Sydsjo G, Josefsson A. Physical activity and psychological well-being in obese pregnant and postpartum women attending a weightgain restriction programme. Midwifery. 2014, doi:10.1016/j.midw.2012.11.006. 5. Tinloy J, Chuang CH, Zhu J, Pauli J, Kraschnewski JL, Kjerulff KH. Exercise during pregnancy and risk of late preterm birth, caesarean delivery and hospitalisations. Womens Health Issue. 2014, doi:10.1016/j.whi.2013.11.003. 6. Fraser A, Tilling K, Macdonald-Wallis C, Hughes R. Sattar N, Nelson S M, et al. Associations of gestational weight gain with maternal body mass index, waist circumference, and blood pressure measured 16 years after pregnancy: the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Am J Clin Nutr. 2011, doi:10.3945/ajcn.110.008326. Bull F, Biddle S, Buchner D, Ferguson R, Foster C, Fox K, et al. Physical Activity Guidelines in the UK: Review and Recommendations. Loughborough: Loughborough University School of Sport Exercise and Health Sciences; 2010. 8. Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists: Exercise in Pregnancy, Statement no4. 2006; https://www.rcog.org.uk/globalassets/documents/ guidelines/statements/statement-no-4.pdf. 9. Evenson KR, Savitz A, Huston SL. Leisure‐time physical activity among pregnant women in the US. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2004; doi:10.1111/j. 1365-3016.2004.00595.x. 10. Gaston A, Vamos CA. Leisure-time physical activity patterns and correlates among pregnant women in Ontario, Canada. Matern Child Health J. 2013. doi:10.1007/s10995-012-1021-z. 11. Borodulin K, Evenson K, Wen F, Herring AH, Benson A. Physical activity patterns during pregnancy. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008. doi:10.1249/MSS. 0b013e31817f1957. 12. Walsh JM, McGowan C, Byrne J, McAiliffe FM. Prevalence of physical activity among healthy pregnant women in Ireland. IJGO. 2011. doi:10.1016/j.ijgo. 2011.02.016. 13. Amezcua-Prieto C, Olmedo-Requena R, Jimenez-Mejias E, Mozas-Moreno J, Lardelli-Claret P, Jimenez-Moleon JJ. Factors associated with changes in leisure time physical activity during early pregnancy. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2013. doi:10.1016/j.ijgo.2012.11.021. 14. Santos PC, Abreu S, Moreira C, Lopes D, Santos R, Alves O, et al. Impact of compliance with different guidelines on physical activity during pregnancy and perceived barriers to leisure physical activity. J Sports Sci. 2014. doi:10.1080/02640414.2014.893369. 15. Cramp A, Bray S. Pre- and postnatal women’s leisure time physical activity patterns: A multilevel longitudinal analysis. Res Q Exerc Sport. 2009. doi:10.1080/02701367.2009.10599578. 16. Hausenblas H, Giacobbi P, Cook B, Rhodes R, Cruz A. Prospective examination of pregnant and nonpregnant women’s physical activity beliefs and behaviours. J Reprod Infant Psychol. 2011. doi:10.1080/02646838.2011.629993. 17. Sui Z, Turnbull DA, Dodd JM. Overweight and obese women’s perceptions about making healthy change during pregnancy: A mixed method study. Matern Child Health J. 2013. doi:10.1007/s10995-012-1211-8. 18. Currie S, Sinclair M, Murphy MH, Madden E, Dunwoody L, Liddle SD. Reducing the decline in physical activity during pregnancy: A systematic review of behaviour change interventions. PloS ONE. 2013. doi:10.1371/ journal.pone.0066385. 19. Shephard RJ. Limits to the measurement of habitual physical activity by questionnaires. Br J Sports Med. 2003. doi:10.1136/bjsm.37.3.197. 20. Westerterp KR. Assessment of physical activity: a critical appraisal. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2009; doi:10.1007/s00421-009-1000-2. 21. Connolly CP, Coe DP, Kendrick JM, Bassett Jr DR, Thompson DL. Accuracy of physical activity monitors in pregnant women. Med Sci Sport Exerc. 2011. doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e3182058883. 22. Harrison CL, Thompson RG, Teede HJ, Lombard CB. Measuring physical activity during pregnancy. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011. doi:10.1186/ 1479-5868-8-19. 23. Chasan-Taber L, Schmidt MD, Roberts DE, Hosmer D, Markenson G, Freedson PS. Development and validation of a pregnancy physical activity questionnaire. Med Sci Sport Exerc. 2004;36:1750–60. 24. Loughlan C, Mutrie N. Conducting an exercise consultation: Guidelines for health professionals. J Inst Health Edu. 1995;33:78–82. 25. Kirk AF, Barnett J, Mutrie N. Physical activity consultation for people with Type 2 diabetes. Evidence and guidelines. Diabet Med 2007. doi:10.1111/j. 1464-5491.2007.02190.x. 26. Fitzsimons CF, Baker G, Wright A, Nimmo MA, Thompson CW, Lowry R, et al. The ‘Walking for Wellbeing in the West’ randomised controlled trial of a pedometer-based walking programme in combination with physical activity consultation with 12 month follow-up: rationale and study design. BMC Public Health. 2008. doi:10.1186/1471-2458-8-259. 27. Fitzsimons CF, Baker G, Gray SR, Nimmo MA, Mutrie N, The Scottish Physical Activity Research Collaboration (SPARColl). Does physical activity counselling enhance the effects of a pedometer-based intervention over the long-term: 12-month findings from the Walking for Wellbeing in the west study. BMC Public Health. 2012. doi:10.1186/1471-2458-12-206. 28. Craig P, Dieppe P, Macintyre S, Michie S, Nazareth I, Petticrew M. Developing and evaluating complex interventions: the new Medical Research Council guidance. BMJ. 2008. doi:10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2012.09.010. 29. Downs DS, Chasan-Taber L, Evenson KR, Leiferman J, Yeo S. Physical activity and pregnancy: past and present evidence and future recommendations. Res Q Exerc Sport. 2012;83:485–502. 30. Schwarzer R. Modelling health behaviour change: How to predict and modify the adoption and maintenance of health behaviours. Appl Psych. 2008;57:1–29. 31. Smith AR, Leiferman JA. Psychosocial mediators to physical activity during the perinatal period: A review of the literature. J Behav Heal. 2012; doi:10.5455/jbh.20120812012004. 32. Evenson KR, Chasan-Taber L, Downs DS, Pearce EE. Review of self-reported physical activity assessments for pregnancy: Summary of the evidence for validity and reliability. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2012. doi:10.1111/j. 1365-3016.2012.01311.x. 33. American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Exercise during pregnancy and the postpartum period: ACOG Committee Opinion No. 267. Obstet Gynecol. 2002;99:171–73. 34. Currie S, Dunwoody L, Sinclair M, Liddle D, Murphy MH, Madden E. Excuses, excuses, excuses: What are the barriers to participation in an antenatal physical activity intervention? HPU. 2015;24(1):8–15. 35. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Antenatal care: Routine Care for the Healthy Pregnancy Woman. (NICE Clinical guideline 62). London: NICE; 2010. 36. Borg G. Psychophysical bases of perceived exertion. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1982;14:377–81. 37. World Health Organisation. Global Recommendations on Physical Activity for Health. Geneva: World Health Organisation; 2010. 38. Michie S, Richardson M, Johnston M, Abraham C, Francis J, Hardeman W, et al. The Behaviour Change Technique Taxonomy (v1) of 93 hierarchicallyclustered techniques: building an international consensus for the reporting of behaviour change interventions. Ann Behav Med. 2013. doi:10.1007/s12160-013-9486-6. 39. Trost SG, McIver KL, Pate RR. Conducting accelerometer-based activity assessments in field-based research. Med Sci Sport Exerc. 2005;37 Suppl 11:531–43. 40. Freedson PS, Melanson E, Sirard J. Calibration of the computer science and applications, Inc. accelerometer. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1998;30:777–81. 41. Schmidt MD, Freedson PS, Pekow P, Roberts D, Sternfeld B, Chasan-Taber L. Validation of the Kaiser Physical Activity Survey in pregnant women. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006. doi:10.1249/01.mss.0000181301.07516.d6. 42. Evenson KR, Calhoun KC, Herring AH, Pritchard D, Wen F, Steiner AZ. Association of physical activity in the past year and immediately after in vitro fertilization on pregnancy. Fertil Steril. 2014. doi:10.1016/j. fertnstert.2013.12.041. 43. Oostdam N, van Poppel M, Wouters M, Eekhoff E, Bekedam D. Kuchenbecker WK, et al. No effect of the FitFor2 exercise programme on blood glucose, insulin sensitivity, and birth weight in pregnant women who were overweight and at risk for gestational diabetes: results of a randomised controlled trial. BJOG. 2012. doi:10.1111/j.1471- 0528.2012.03366.x. 44. Matevey C, Rogers LQ, Dawson E, Tudor-Locke C. Lack of reactivity during pedometer self-monitoring in adults. Meas Phys Educ Exerc Sci. 2006; doi:10.1207/s15327841mpee1001_1. 45. Behrens TK, Dinger MK. Motion sensor reactivity in physically active young adults. Res Quart Exercise Sport. 2007; doi:10.1080/02701367. 2007.10599397. 46. Godin G, Belanger-Gravel A, Amireault A, Vohl M, Perusse L. The effect of mere-measurement of cognitions on physical activity behaviour: a randomized controlled trial among overweight and obese individuals. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011; doi:10.1186/1479-5868-8-2. 47. Morwitz VG, Johnson E, Schmittlein D. Does measuring intent change behaviour? J Consum Res. 1993;20(1):46–61. 48. Callaway LK, Colditz PB, Byrne NM, Lingwood BE, Rowlands IJ, Foxcroft K, et al. Prevention of gestational diabetes: feasibility issues for an exercise intervention in obese pregnant women. Diabetes Care 2010. doi:10.2337/ dc09-2336. 49. Weir Z, Bush J, Robson SC, McParlin C, Rankin J, Bell R. Physical activity in pregnancy: a qualitative study of the beliefs of overweight and obese pregnant women. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2010. doi:10.1186/1471-2393-10-18. 50. Heery E, McConnon A, Kelleher CC, Wall PG, McAuliffe FM. Perspectives on weight gain and lifestyle practices during pregnancy among women with a history of macrosomia: a qualitative study in the Republic of Ireland. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013. doi:10.1186/1471-2393-13-202.

PY - 2015/12/18

Y1 - 2015/12/18

N2 - Background: Physical Activity (PA) during pregnancy has many health benefits, however, inactivity in this populationis common and PA often declines with increasing gestation. PA consultations have been useful in promoting PA in thegeneral population, however their use for addressing PA in pregnancy is unknown. This study aimed to examine if atheory-based intervention using PA consultations would reduce the magnitude of decline in objectively measured PAbetween the first and third trimesters of pregnancy.Methods: A RCT was carried out in an urban maternity unit in Northern Ireland between September 2012 and June 2013. 109 low-risk, primigravida pregnant women were randomised to a control (n = 54) or intervention group (n = 55).Intervention: Participants received three face-to-face individual PA consultations. Daily PA was measured in each trimester using seven day accelerometry. The study was approved by a NHS trust (12/NI/0036). PA data in counts per minute (CPM) were categorised into intensity using Freedson cut points and mean minutes of PA were compared between groups using repeated measures ANOVA with a sub-analysis stratifying participants per PA level in trimester one.Results: Intention to treat analysis was performed on data from 97 participants. Time in moderate, vigorous and moderate-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) significantly declined between trimesters one and three in both groups (P<0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in PA between groups in any trimester. Women in the intervention group who were less active in trimester one did not demonstrate a significant decline in MVPA throughout pregnancy (in contrast with the decline identified in the more active participants).Conclusions: The findings indicate that PA consultations were not effective in reducing the decline of MVPA inthroughout pregnancy, however, women who were less active in trimester one and received PA consultations had a lesser decrease in MVPA. It is possible that pregnant women, specifically those who are more active at the start of pregnancy, have differing needs for PA behaviour change and maintenance, requiring more intense interventions than less active women.Trial Registration: Current Controlled Trials Register ISRCTN61829137.Keywords: Physical activity, Pregnancy, Decline, Patterns, RCT, Intervention

AB - Background: Physical Activity (PA) during pregnancy has many health benefits, however, inactivity in this populationis common and PA often declines with increasing gestation. PA consultations have been useful in promoting PA in thegeneral population, however their use for addressing PA in pregnancy is unknown. This study aimed to examine if atheory-based intervention using PA consultations would reduce the magnitude of decline in objectively measured PAbetween the first and third trimesters of pregnancy.Methods: A RCT was carried out in an urban maternity unit in Northern Ireland between September 2012 and June 2013. 109 low-risk, primigravida pregnant women were randomised to a control (n = 54) or intervention group (n = 55).Intervention: Participants received three face-to-face individual PA consultations. Daily PA was measured in each trimester using seven day accelerometry. The study was approved by a NHS trust (12/NI/0036). PA data in counts per minute (CPM) were categorised into intensity using Freedson cut points and mean minutes of PA were compared between groups using repeated measures ANOVA with a sub-analysis stratifying participants per PA level in trimester one.Results: Intention to treat analysis was performed on data from 97 participants. Time in moderate, vigorous and moderate-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) significantly declined between trimesters one and three in both groups (P<0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in PA between groups in any trimester. Women in the intervention group who were less active in trimester one did not demonstrate a significant decline in MVPA throughout pregnancy (in contrast with the decline identified in the more active participants).Conclusions: The findings indicate that PA consultations were not effective in reducing the decline of MVPA inthroughout pregnancy, however, women who were less active in trimester one and received PA consultations had a lesser decrease in MVPA. It is possible that pregnant women, specifically those who are more active at the start of pregnancy, have differing needs for PA behaviour change and maintenance, requiring more intense interventions than less active women.Trial Registration: Current Controlled Trials Register ISRCTN61829137.Keywords: Physical activity, Pregnancy, Decline, Patterns, RCT, Intervention

KW - Physical activity

KW - Pregnancy

KW - Decline

KW - Patterns

KW - RCT

KW - Intervention

U2 - 10.1186/s12889-015-2548-x

DO - 10.1186/s12889-015-2548-x

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 15:1259

JO - BMC Public Health

T2 - BMC Public Health

JF - BMC Public Health

SN - 1471-2458

ER -