An investigation into the relationship between health literacy, eHealth literacy and online health information seeking behaviour

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Context and Background: Health information seekers are increasingly using online health information to answer health questions. Nevertheless, the ability to evaluate and use online health information may be affected by an individual’s level of health literacy and eHealth literacy. Aim of the study: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between how an individual searches for and uses online health information and their level of health literacy and eHealth literacy.Research Methodology: We recruited 22 participants of whom 14 were male and 8 female, with an age range of 22 to 38. Each participant was presented with 6 health questions and searched online for information to answer the questions. Searching behaviour was recorded, this included the search terms entered, the websites visited and the duration of each question. Each individual also completed the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) health literacy tool and the eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS).Key findings: The NVS scores indicated that 21 of the participants had adequate health literacy skills. Moreover 16 participants indicated that they were confident in using online health information and 17 agreed that they could distinguish between high and low quality online health resources. There was variation in the number of questions answered however all participants answered 3 or more questions correctly. Only 2 participants gathered information solely from government or certified health websites while the remaining participants utilised certified and uncertified websites to answer the questions.Conclusion: All the participants were able to use online health information to correctly answer health questions. Despite having adequate health literacy skills most individuals utilised both accredited and uncertified health information. Moreover, the most frequent online seeking method for discovering health information was through search engine results.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 18 Jun 2015
EventHealth Promotion Conference. Health Literacy: Research, Policy & Practice - Galway, Ireland
Duration: 18 Jun 2015 → …

Conference

ConferenceHealth Promotion Conference. Health Literacy: Research, Policy & Practice
Period18/06/15 → …

Fingerprint

Information Seeking Behavior
Health Literacy
Telemedicine
Health
Vital Signs
Health Status
Appetitive Behavior
Search Engine
Aptitude
Health Resources

Keywords

  • health literacy

Cite this

@inproceedings{6ddc9d61e96e4f97b864343621c33bc3,
title = "An investigation into the relationship between health literacy, eHealth literacy and online health information seeking behaviour",
abstract = "Context and Background: Health information seekers are increasingly using online health information to answer health questions. Nevertheless, the ability to evaluate and use online health information may be affected by an individual’s level of health literacy and eHealth literacy. Aim of the study: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between how an individual searches for and uses online health information and their level of health literacy and eHealth literacy.Research Methodology: We recruited 22 participants of whom 14 were male and 8 female, with an age range of 22 to 38. Each participant was presented with 6 health questions and searched online for information to answer the questions. Searching behaviour was recorded, this included the search terms entered, the websites visited and the duration of each question. Each individual also completed the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) health literacy tool and the eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS).Key findings: The NVS scores indicated that 21 of the participants had adequate health literacy skills. Moreover 16 participants indicated that they were confident in using online health information and 17 agreed that they could distinguish between high and low quality online health resources. There was variation in the number of questions answered however all participants answered 3 or more questions correctly. Only 2 participants gathered information solely from government or certified health websites while the remaining participants utilised certified and uncertified websites to answer the questions.Conclusion: All the participants were able to use online health information to correctly answer health questions. Despite having adequate health literacy skills most individuals utilised both accredited and uncertified health information. Moreover, the most frequent online seeking method for discovering health information was through search engine results.",
keywords = "health literacy",
author = "Susan Quinn and Raymond Bond and Nugent, {Chris D.}",
year = "2015",
month = "6",
day = "18",
language = "English",
booktitle = "Unknown Host Publication",

}

Quinn, S, Bond, R & Nugent, CD 2015, An investigation into the relationship between health literacy, eHealth literacy and online health information seeking behaviour. in Unknown Host Publication. Health Promotion Conference. Health Literacy: Research, Policy & Practice, 18/06/15.

An investigation into the relationship between health literacy, eHealth literacy and online health information seeking behaviour. / Quinn, Susan; Bond, Raymond; Nugent, Chris D.

Unknown Host Publication. 2015.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - An investigation into the relationship between health literacy, eHealth literacy and online health information seeking behaviour

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AU - Nugent, Chris D.

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N2 - Context and Background: Health information seekers are increasingly using online health information to answer health questions. Nevertheless, the ability to evaluate and use online health information may be affected by an individual’s level of health literacy and eHealth literacy. Aim of the study: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between how an individual searches for and uses online health information and their level of health literacy and eHealth literacy.Research Methodology: We recruited 22 participants of whom 14 were male and 8 female, with an age range of 22 to 38. Each participant was presented with 6 health questions and searched online for information to answer the questions. Searching behaviour was recorded, this included the search terms entered, the websites visited and the duration of each question. Each individual also completed the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) health literacy tool and the eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS).Key findings: The NVS scores indicated that 21 of the participants had adequate health literacy skills. Moreover 16 participants indicated that they were confident in using online health information and 17 agreed that they could distinguish between high and low quality online health resources. There was variation in the number of questions answered however all participants answered 3 or more questions correctly. Only 2 participants gathered information solely from government or certified health websites while the remaining participants utilised certified and uncertified websites to answer the questions.Conclusion: All the participants were able to use online health information to correctly answer health questions. Despite having adequate health literacy skills most individuals utilised both accredited and uncertified health information. Moreover, the most frequent online seeking method for discovering health information was through search engine results.

AB - Context and Background: Health information seekers are increasingly using online health information to answer health questions. Nevertheless, the ability to evaluate and use online health information may be affected by an individual’s level of health literacy and eHealth literacy. Aim of the study: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between how an individual searches for and uses online health information and their level of health literacy and eHealth literacy.Research Methodology: We recruited 22 participants of whom 14 were male and 8 female, with an age range of 22 to 38. Each participant was presented with 6 health questions and searched online for information to answer the questions. Searching behaviour was recorded, this included the search terms entered, the websites visited and the duration of each question. Each individual also completed the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) health literacy tool and the eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS).Key findings: The NVS scores indicated that 21 of the participants had adequate health literacy skills. Moreover 16 participants indicated that they were confident in using online health information and 17 agreed that they could distinguish between high and low quality online health resources. There was variation in the number of questions answered however all participants answered 3 or more questions correctly. Only 2 participants gathered information solely from government or certified health websites while the remaining participants utilised certified and uncertified websites to answer the questions.Conclusion: All the participants were able to use online health information to correctly answer health questions. Despite having adequate health literacy skills most individuals utilised both accredited and uncertified health information. Moreover, the most frequent online seeking method for discovering health information was through search engine results.

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M3 - Conference contribution

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