An investigation into the attitudes and practices of intensive care nurses towards verbal communication with unconscious patients

C Baker, Vidar Melby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study attempted to investigate the attitudes and practices of intensive care nurses towards verbal communication with unconscious patients. A sample of five staff nurses working in an intensive care unit in Northern Ireland formed the basis for the study. The research design was non-experimental and descriptive-exploratory in nature, incorporating 4-hourly observational periods and structured interviews. Qualitative and quantitative analysis indicated that intensive care nurses spend on average 5% of their time verbally communicating with unconscious patients. Most of this communication involves informing the patient of immediate procedural matters or providing reassuring statements. Most intensive care nurses claim that verbal communication with unconscious patients is very important, and some ambiguity is apparent as to the unconscious patient's level of awareness. Major factors influencing communication are the patient's level of consciousness, the amount of physical care being given and the presence of relatives.
LanguageEnglish
Pages185-192
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1996

Fingerprint

Critical Care
Nurses
Communication
Northern Ireland
Consciousness
Intensive Care Units
Unconscious (Psychology)
Research Design
Interviews

Cite this

@article{0dcb24b98d574e698fe089aae6f5170a,
title = "An investigation into the attitudes and practices of intensive care nurses towards verbal communication with unconscious patients",
abstract = "This study attempted to investigate the attitudes and practices of intensive care nurses towards verbal communication with unconscious patients. A sample of five staff nurses working in an intensive care unit in Northern Ireland formed the basis for the study. The research design was non-experimental and descriptive-exploratory in nature, incorporating 4-hourly observational periods and structured interviews. Qualitative and quantitative analysis indicated that intensive care nurses spend on average 5{\%} of their time verbally communicating with unconscious patients. Most of this communication involves informing the patient of immediate procedural matters or providing reassuring statements. Most intensive care nurses claim that verbal communication with unconscious patients is very important, and some ambiguity is apparent as to the unconscious patient's level of awareness. Major factors influencing communication are the patient's level of consciousness, the amount of physical care being given and the presence of relatives.",
author = "C Baker and Vidar Melby",
year = "1996",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2702.1996.tb00248.x",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "185--192",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Nursing",
issn = "0962-1067",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - An investigation into the attitudes and practices of intensive care nurses towards verbal communication with unconscious patients

AU - Baker, C

AU - Melby, Vidar

PY - 1996/5

Y1 - 1996/5

N2 - This study attempted to investigate the attitudes and practices of intensive care nurses towards verbal communication with unconscious patients. A sample of five staff nurses working in an intensive care unit in Northern Ireland formed the basis for the study. The research design was non-experimental and descriptive-exploratory in nature, incorporating 4-hourly observational periods and structured interviews. Qualitative and quantitative analysis indicated that intensive care nurses spend on average 5% of their time verbally communicating with unconscious patients. Most of this communication involves informing the patient of immediate procedural matters or providing reassuring statements. Most intensive care nurses claim that verbal communication with unconscious patients is very important, and some ambiguity is apparent as to the unconscious patient's level of awareness. Major factors influencing communication are the patient's level of consciousness, the amount of physical care being given and the presence of relatives.

AB - This study attempted to investigate the attitudes and practices of intensive care nurses towards verbal communication with unconscious patients. A sample of five staff nurses working in an intensive care unit in Northern Ireland formed the basis for the study. The research design was non-experimental and descriptive-exploratory in nature, incorporating 4-hourly observational periods and structured interviews. Qualitative and quantitative analysis indicated that intensive care nurses spend on average 5% of their time verbally communicating with unconscious patients. Most of this communication involves informing the patient of immediate procedural matters or providing reassuring statements. Most intensive care nurses claim that verbal communication with unconscious patients is very important, and some ambiguity is apparent as to the unconscious patient's level of awareness. Major factors influencing communication are the patient's level of consciousness, the amount of physical care being given and the presence of relatives.

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2702.1996.tb00248.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2702.1996.tb00248.x

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 185

EP - 192

JO - Journal of Clinical Nursing

T2 - Journal of Clinical Nursing

JF - Journal of Clinical Nursing

SN - 0962-1067

IS - 3

ER -