An analysis of quasi-qualification, modified auditor opinions and special treatment status on China’s Shenzhen market

Donglin Pei, Philip Hamill, Kwaku Kyekyeku Opong

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The development of accounting, auditing and capital markets in China were an integral omponent of China’s economic reforms; auditing was regarded as being critically important to achieving the desired policy objective of delivering a market economy (Yang and Yang, 1998). This article examines the quasi-qualification hypothesis and tests whether investors valued the introduction of Special Treatment (ST) status for firms in 1998. Our empirical analysis fails to find significant support for the quasi-qualification hypothesis. In contrast, it appears that the issuance of ST status was valued by investors; the issuance of ST status led investors to discriminate between firms.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages1265-1271
    JournalApplied Economics Letters
    Volume17
    Issue number13
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

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    Shenzhen
    Auditors
    Qualification
    China
    Investors
    Auditing
    Integral
    Economic reform
    Capital markets
    Empirical analysis
    Market economy

    Cite this

    Pei, Donglin ; Hamill, Philip ; Opong, Kwaku Kyekyeku. / An analysis of quasi-qualification, modified auditor opinions and special treatment status on China’s Shenzhen market. In: Applied Economics Letters. 2010 ; Vol. 17, No. 13. pp. 1265-1271.
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    An analysis of quasi-qualification, modified auditor opinions and special treatment status on China’s Shenzhen market. / Pei, Donglin; Hamill, Philip; Opong, Kwaku Kyekyeku.

    In: Applied Economics Letters, Vol. 17, No. 13, 2010, p. 1265-1271.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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