Alcohol use, regular use, disorder and remission from use disorders in Northern Ireland: a prevalence study

B Bunting, Chrianna Bharat

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Abstract

Background: This study presents prevalence estimates and ages of onset for alcohol use, regular use, use disorders and remission
from use disorders in Northern Ireland, and the time for transitioning between these stages.
Methods: Data on alcohol use, lifetime history, and remission from alcohol conditions as defined by the DSM-IV were collected
using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview.
Results: By the age of 17 years 50% of the age cohort had started taking alcohol. By 19 years of age 67% of the cohort were regular
users, and by 20 years of age 45% of the cohort were abusing alcohol. Remission from abuse/dependence was related to the number
of years since commencing the use of alcohol, with women being more likely than men to move to remission sooner, and the cohort
in which the person had commenced alcohol consumption also influenced the move to remission.
Conclusions: The consumption of alcohol is high within Northern Ireland with some 83% of the population consuming alcohol, and
with over 90% of this group taking alcohol on a regular basis. The abuse of alcohol was particularly marked amongst students and
males, with dependence showing a higher prevalence amongst those with the lowest level of educational attainment, and where
the commencement of alcohol consumption was at an early age. Transitions between stages of lifetime alcohol use, regular use,
and use disorders were associated with the early commencement of alcohol use, education, cohort use and being male.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)347-353
Number of pages7
JournalAddiction Research and Theory
Volume27
Issue number4
Early online date13 Jan 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Jul 2019

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Keywords

  • Alcohol use
  • Northern Ireland
  • prevalence
  • remission
  • use disorder

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