Adult experience of mental health outcomes as a result of intimate partner violence victimisation: a systematic review

Susan Lagdon, Cherie Armour, Maurice Stringer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

96 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background
Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been known to adversely affect the mental health of victims. Research has tended to focus on the mental health impact of physical violence rather than considering other forms of violence.

Objective
To systematically review the literature in order to identify the impact of all types of IPV victimisation on various mental health outcomes.

Method
A systematic review of 11 electronic databases (2004–2014) was conducted. Fifty eight papers were identified and later described and reviewed in relation to the main objective.

Results
Main findings suggest that IPV can have increasing adverse effects on the mental health of victims in comparison with those who have never experienced IPV or those experiencing other traumatic events. The most significant outcomes were associations between IPV experiences with depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and anxiety. Findings confirm previous observations that the severity and extent of IPV exposure can increase mental health symptoms. The effect of psychological violence on mental health is more prominent than originally thought. Individual differences such as gender and childhood experience of violence also increase IPV risk and affect mental health outcomes in diverse ways.
Original languageEnglish
Article number24794
Pages (from-to)1-12
JournalEuropean Journal of Psychotraumatology
Volume5
Issue number1
Early online date12 Sep 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Crime Victims
Mental Health
Violence
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Intimate Partner Violence
Individuality
Anxiety
Databases
Depression
Psychology
Research

Keywords

  • Intimate partner violence
  • domestic violence
  • PTSD
  • depression
  • gender
  • mental health

Cite this

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Adult experience of mental health outcomes as a result of intimate partner violence victimisation: a systematic review. / Lagdon, Susan; Armour, Cherie; Stringer, Maurice.

In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, Vol. 5, No. 1, 24794, 2014, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Adult experience of mental health outcomes as a result of intimate partner violence victimisation: a systematic review

AU - Lagdon, Susan

AU - Armour, Cherie

AU - Stringer, Maurice

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

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