Adolescents’ Experiences of Victimization: The Role of Attribution Style and Generalized Trust

Lucy Betts, JE Houston, Oonagh Steer, Sarah Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Positive attribution style, negative attribution style, and generalized peer trust beliefs were examined as mediators in the relationship between adolescents’ peer victimization experiences and psychosocial and school adjustment. A total of 280 (150 female and 130 males, Mage = 13 years 4 months, SDage = 1 year 1 month) adolescents completed measures of peer victimization, global self-worth,depressive symptoms, social confidence, school liking, loneliness,attribution styles, and generalized trust beliefs. Multigroup path analysis revealed that: (a) negative attribution style mediated the relationship between cyber victimization and school liking and depressive symptoms for males and females; (b) positive attribution style mediated the relationship between cyber victimization, school liking, global self-worth, and depressive symptoms for females; and(c) generalized peer trust beliefs mediated the relationship between social victimization, depressive symptoms, social confidence, and loneliness for females. Consequently, attribution style and generalized trust beliefs differentially influence the relationship between peer victimization and adjustment.
LanguageEnglish
Pages25-48
JournalJournal of School Violence
Volume16
Issue number1
Early online date4 Jan 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Mar 2017

Fingerprint

victimization
attribution
adolescent
experience
school
confidence
path analysis

Keywords

  • attribution style, psychosocial adjustment, school adjustment, trust, victimization

Cite this

Betts, Lucy ; Houston, JE ; Steer, Oonagh ; Gardner, Sarah. / Adolescents’ Experiences of Victimization: The Role of Attribution Style and Generalized Trust. 2017 ; Vol. 16, No. 1. pp. 25-48.
@article{ea2203f997bf45b78c070e43983d9235,
title = "Adolescents’ Experiences of Victimization: The Role of Attribution Style and Generalized Trust",
abstract = "Positive attribution style, negative attribution style, and generalized peer trust beliefs were examined as mediators in the relationship between adolescents’ peer victimization experiences and psychosocial and school adjustment. A total of 280 (150 female and 130 males, Mage = 13 years 4 months, SDage = 1 year 1 month) adolescents completed measures of peer victimization, global self-worth,depressive symptoms, social confidence, school liking, loneliness,attribution styles, and generalized trust beliefs. Multigroup path analysis revealed that: (a) negative attribution style mediated the relationship between cyber victimization and school liking and depressive symptoms for males and females; (b) positive attribution style mediated the relationship between cyber victimization, school liking, global self-worth, and depressive symptoms for females; and(c) generalized peer trust beliefs mediated the relationship between social victimization, depressive symptoms, social confidence, and loneliness for females. Consequently, attribution style and generalized trust beliefs differentially influence the relationship between peer victimization and adjustment.",
keywords = "attribution style, psychosocial adjustment, school adjustment, trust, victimization",
author = "Lucy Betts and JE Houston and Oonagh Steer and Sarah Gardner",
note = "accepted before 1 Apr 2016 n/a",
year = "2017",
month = "3",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1080/15388220.2015.1100117",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "25--48",
number = "1",

}

Adolescents’ Experiences of Victimization: The Role of Attribution Style and Generalized Trust. / Betts, Lucy; Houston, JE; Steer, Oonagh ; Gardner, Sarah.

Vol. 16, No. 1, 31.03.2017, p. 25-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adolescents’ Experiences of Victimization: The Role of Attribution Style and Generalized Trust

AU - Betts, Lucy

AU - Houston, JE

AU - Steer, Oonagh

AU - Gardner, Sarah

N1 - accepted before 1 Apr 2016 n/a

PY - 2017/3/31

Y1 - 2017/3/31

N2 - Positive attribution style, negative attribution style, and generalized peer trust beliefs were examined as mediators in the relationship between adolescents’ peer victimization experiences and psychosocial and school adjustment. A total of 280 (150 female and 130 males, Mage = 13 years 4 months, SDage = 1 year 1 month) adolescents completed measures of peer victimization, global self-worth,depressive symptoms, social confidence, school liking, loneliness,attribution styles, and generalized trust beliefs. Multigroup path analysis revealed that: (a) negative attribution style mediated the relationship between cyber victimization and school liking and depressive symptoms for males and females; (b) positive attribution style mediated the relationship between cyber victimization, school liking, global self-worth, and depressive symptoms for females; and(c) generalized peer trust beliefs mediated the relationship between social victimization, depressive symptoms, social confidence, and loneliness for females. Consequently, attribution style and generalized trust beliefs differentially influence the relationship between peer victimization and adjustment.

AB - Positive attribution style, negative attribution style, and generalized peer trust beliefs were examined as mediators in the relationship between adolescents’ peer victimization experiences and psychosocial and school adjustment. A total of 280 (150 female and 130 males, Mage = 13 years 4 months, SDage = 1 year 1 month) adolescents completed measures of peer victimization, global self-worth,depressive symptoms, social confidence, school liking, loneliness,attribution styles, and generalized trust beliefs. Multigroup path analysis revealed that: (a) negative attribution style mediated the relationship between cyber victimization and school liking and depressive symptoms for males and females; (b) positive attribution style mediated the relationship between cyber victimization, school liking, global self-worth, and depressive symptoms for females; and(c) generalized peer trust beliefs mediated the relationship between social victimization, depressive symptoms, social confidence, and loneliness for females. Consequently, attribution style and generalized trust beliefs differentially influence the relationship between peer victimization and adjustment.

KW - attribution style, psychosocial adjustment, school adjustment, trust, victimization

U2 - 10.1080/15388220.2015.1100117

DO - 10.1080/15388220.2015.1100117

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 25

EP - 48

IS - 1

ER -