Access to intervene: the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission and the Northern Ireland Act 1998

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Abstract

The article explores the issue of access to make human rights interventions in legal proceedings by first exploring the House of Lords judgments in Re Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, where the appeal was allowed, and their contrasting approach in Robinson v Secretary of State for Northern Ireland. It proceeds to consider the effect that the determination of the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission's (“NIHRC”) role has had on the debate to establish a UK-wide Human Rights Commission, looking at the recent findings of the Joint Committee on Human Rights, the Scottish Executive's introduction of a consultation paper and the potential influence of the above on the Government's decision on whether to establish a Commission for the United Kingdom. It then examines examples of bodies making third party and amicus curiae interventions and the impact of these interventions.
LanguageEnglish
Pages423-436
JournalEuropean Human Rights Law Review
Volume4
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2003

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human rights
act
legal proceedings
appeal

Keywords

  • Administration of justice
  • Human rights
  • Interveners
  • Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission
  • Northern Ireland
  • Scotland

Cite this

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