A Wii Bit of Fun: A Novel Platform to Deliver Effective Balance Training to Older Adults

Caroline Whyatt, Niamh A. Merriman, William R Young, Fiona N Newell, Cathy Craig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Falls and fall-related injuries are symptomatic of an aging population. This study aimed to design, develop, and deliver a novel method of balance training, using an interactive game-based system to promote engagement, with the inclusion of older adults at both high and low risk of experiencing a fall.STUDY DESIGN: Eighty-two older adults (65 years of age and older) were recruited from sheltered accommodation and local activity groups. Forty volunteers were randomly selected and received 5 weeks of balance game training (5 males, 35 females; mean, 77.18 ± 6.59 years), whereas the remaining control participants recorded levels of physical activity (20 males, 22 females; mean, 76.62 ± 7.28 years). The effect of balance game training was measured on levels of functional balance and balance confidence in individuals with and without quantifiable balance impairments.RESULTS: Balance game training had a significant effect on levels of functional balance and balance confidence (P 
LanguageEnglish
Pages423-33
Number of pages389
JournalGames for Health
Volume4
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Oct 2015

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Whyatt, Caroline ; Merriman, Niamh A. ; Young, William R ; Newell, Fiona N ; Craig, Cathy. / A Wii Bit of Fun: A Novel Platform to Deliver Effective Balance Training to Older Adults. In: Games for Health. 2015 ; Vol. 4, No. 6. pp. 423-33.
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A Wii Bit of Fun: A Novel Platform to Deliver Effective Balance Training to Older Adults. / Whyatt, Caroline; Merriman, Niamh A.; Young, William R; Newell, Fiona N; Craig, Cathy.

In: Games for Health, Vol. 4, No. 6, 28.10.2015, p. 423-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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