A STUDY OF HUMAN BEHAVIOUR DURING EVACUATION OF LICENSED PREMISES

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

An understanding of the behaviour of individuals and groups during evacuation is key to thedevelopment of evacuation scenarios as part of an engineering design solution. Furthermore, it is important that engineers have reliable and accurate data on pre-evacuation times and movement for use in time based evacuation analysis. This paper presents the analysis of an unannounced evacuation of licensed premises in Northern Ireland and provides important data and understanding regarding behaviour for use in fire safety engineering design and evacuation modelling. Findings on recognition times, response behaviours, pre evacuation times and final exit flows for a function room and lounge bar in the licenced property are provided. The results suggest that the evacuation time in the lounge bar was characterised by generally longer pre-evacuation times and relatively shorter movement times, whereas the evacuation time in the more densely populated function room was characterised by shorter pre-evacuation times but extended flow times. The impact of staff intervention through directed voice communications and the variation in response behaviours between the two areas are discussed.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
Place of PublicationUK
Pages373-384
Number of pages12
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2015
Event6th International Human Behaviour in Fire 2015 symposium -
Duration: 1 Sep 2015 → …

Conference

Conference6th International Human Behaviour in Fire 2015 symposium
Period1/09/15 → …

Fingerprint

Safety engineering
Speech communication
Fires
Engineers

Keywords

  • Human Behaviour
  • Evacuation
  • Licensed Premises
  • recognition times
  • response behaviours
  • pre-evacuation times
  • voice communications

Cite this

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title = "A STUDY OF HUMAN BEHAVIOUR DURING EVACUATION OF LICENSED PREMISES",
abstract = "An understanding of the behaviour of individuals and groups during evacuation is key to thedevelopment of evacuation scenarios as part of an engineering design solution. Furthermore, it is important that engineers have reliable and accurate data on pre-evacuation times and movement for use in time based evacuation analysis. This paper presents the analysis of an unannounced evacuation of licensed premises in Northern Ireland and provides important data and understanding regarding behaviour for use in fire safety engineering design and evacuation modelling. Findings on recognition times, response behaviours, pre evacuation times and final exit flows for a function room and lounge bar in the licenced property are provided. The results suggest that the evacuation time in the lounge bar was characterised by generally longer pre-evacuation times and relatively shorter movement times, whereas the evacuation time in the more densely populated function room was characterised by shorter pre-evacuation times but extended flow times. The impact of staff intervention through directed voice communications and the variation in response behaviours between the two areas are discussed.",
keywords = "Human Behaviour, Evacuation, Licensed Premises, recognition times, response behaviours, pre-evacuation times, voice communications",
author = "Karen Boyce and McConnell, {N C}",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-0-9933933-0-3",
pages = "373--384",
booktitle = "Unknown Host Publication",

}

Boyce, K & McConnell, NC 2015, A STUDY OF HUMAN BEHAVIOUR DURING EVACUATION OF LICENSED PREMISES. in Unknown Host Publication. UK, pp. 373-384, 6th International Human Behaviour in Fire 2015 symposium, 1/09/15.

A STUDY OF HUMAN BEHAVIOUR DURING EVACUATION OF LICENSED PREMISES. / Boyce, Karen; McConnell, N C.

Unknown Host Publication. UK, 2015. p. 373-384.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - A STUDY OF HUMAN BEHAVIOUR DURING EVACUATION OF LICENSED PREMISES

AU - Boyce, Karen

AU - McConnell, N C

PY - 2015/9

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N2 - An understanding of the behaviour of individuals and groups during evacuation is key to thedevelopment of evacuation scenarios as part of an engineering design solution. Furthermore, it is important that engineers have reliable and accurate data on pre-evacuation times and movement for use in time based evacuation analysis. This paper presents the analysis of an unannounced evacuation of licensed premises in Northern Ireland and provides important data and understanding regarding behaviour for use in fire safety engineering design and evacuation modelling. Findings on recognition times, response behaviours, pre evacuation times and final exit flows for a function room and lounge bar in the licenced property are provided. The results suggest that the evacuation time in the lounge bar was characterised by generally longer pre-evacuation times and relatively shorter movement times, whereas the evacuation time in the more densely populated function room was characterised by shorter pre-evacuation times but extended flow times. The impact of staff intervention through directed voice communications and the variation in response behaviours between the two areas are discussed.

AB - An understanding of the behaviour of individuals and groups during evacuation is key to thedevelopment of evacuation scenarios as part of an engineering design solution. Furthermore, it is important that engineers have reliable and accurate data on pre-evacuation times and movement for use in time based evacuation analysis. This paper presents the analysis of an unannounced evacuation of licensed premises in Northern Ireland and provides important data and understanding regarding behaviour for use in fire safety engineering design and evacuation modelling. Findings on recognition times, response behaviours, pre evacuation times and final exit flows for a function room and lounge bar in the licenced property are provided. The results suggest that the evacuation time in the lounge bar was characterised by generally longer pre-evacuation times and relatively shorter movement times, whereas the evacuation time in the more densely populated function room was characterised by shorter pre-evacuation times but extended flow times. The impact of staff intervention through directed voice communications and the variation in response behaviours between the two areas are discussed.

KW - Human Behaviour

KW - Evacuation

KW - Licensed Premises

KW - recognition times

KW - response behaviours

KW - pre-evacuation times

KW - voice communications

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 978-0-9933933-0-3

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BT - Unknown Host Publication

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