A QUANTITATIVE STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF CAVITATION ON ADULT, INFANT AND BOVINE ARTICULAR-CARTILAGE

P WATSON, George Kernohan, RAB MOLLAN, KE CARR, RS GILMORE

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Specimens of human condylar articular cartilage, removed at necropsy, together with specimens of bovine condylar articular cartilage from commercially slaughtered cattle, were subjected to damage from cavitation (the growth and collapse of gas or vapour bubbles in a liquid) generated ultrasonically. The damaged specimens were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Pits and craters were observed on the surface of the damaged specimens which were not present on control specimens. The frequency of these features, together with the area and form factor of each feature, was noted and compared to previously published figures from anatomical studies. The results agreed well with previous studies in all parameters except frequency which was approximately one order of magnitude lower than previously published data. This suggested that cavitation was uncovering some, but not all, cell lacunae. An increase in crater frequency was displayed with age, in contrast' to a previously published decrease in lacuna frequency, which implied that adult articular cartilage becomes increasingly sensitive to damage with age. Cavitation is proposed as a possible aetiological mechanism in osteoarthritis.
LanguageEnglish
Pages197-207
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Rheumatology
Volume5
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1992

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Articular Cartilage
Osteoarthritis
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Gases
Growth

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@article{d74cf0e8a9a04c6dae4c7326c0c5bfe6,
title = "A QUANTITATIVE STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF CAVITATION ON ADULT, INFANT AND BOVINE ARTICULAR-CARTILAGE",
abstract = "Specimens of human condylar articular cartilage, removed at necropsy, together with specimens of bovine condylar articular cartilage from commercially slaughtered cattle, were subjected to damage from cavitation (the growth and collapse of gas or vapour bubbles in a liquid) generated ultrasonically. The damaged specimens were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Pits and craters were observed on the surface of the damaged specimens which were not present on control specimens. The frequency of these features, together with the area and form factor of each feature, was noted and compared to previously published figures from anatomical studies. The results agreed well with previous studies in all parameters except frequency which was approximately one order of magnitude lower than previously published data. This suggested that cavitation was uncovering some, but not all, cell lacunae. An increase in crater frequency was displayed with age, in contrast' to a previously published decrease in lacuna frequency, which implied that adult articular cartilage becomes increasingly sensitive to damage with age. Cavitation is proposed as a possible aetiological mechanism in osteoarthritis.",
author = "P WATSON and George Kernohan and RAB MOLLAN and KE CARR and RS GILMORE",
year = "1992",
month = "12",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "197--207",
journal = "Journal of Orthopaedic Rheumatology",
issn = "0951-9580",
publisher = "Chapman and Hall Medical",
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A QUANTITATIVE STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF CAVITATION ON ADULT, INFANT AND BOVINE ARTICULAR-CARTILAGE. / WATSON, P; Kernohan, George; MOLLAN, RAB; CARR, KE; GILMORE, RS.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic Rheumatology, Vol. 5, No. 4, 12.1992, p. 197-207.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Specimens of human condylar articular cartilage, removed at necropsy, together with specimens of bovine condylar articular cartilage from commercially slaughtered cattle, were subjected to damage from cavitation (the growth and collapse of gas or vapour bubbles in a liquid) generated ultrasonically. The damaged specimens were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Pits and craters were observed on the surface of the damaged specimens which were not present on control specimens. The frequency of these features, together with the area and form factor of each feature, was noted and compared to previously published figures from anatomical studies. The results agreed well with previous studies in all parameters except frequency which was approximately one order of magnitude lower than previously published data. This suggested that cavitation was uncovering some, but not all, cell lacunae. An increase in crater frequency was displayed with age, in contrast' to a previously published decrease in lacuna frequency, which implied that adult articular cartilage becomes increasingly sensitive to damage with age. Cavitation is proposed as a possible aetiological mechanism in osteoarthritis.

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